They enjoy the freedom and the experience

These people like to swing and share their partners with other people. They enjoy the freedom and the experience is never the same.

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He likes to taste her sexy ass and pussy

She is dressed in a sexy fishnet outfit and wearing boots with high heels he likes to taste her ass and pussy and she sucks his dick.

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Tiny girl is being taken by a big muscled man

A tiny girl is being taken by a big muscled man on a leather couch. She moans when he penetrates her.

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Blonde chick in boots playing with her toy

Blonde chick in sexy boots playing with a some what strange but very long dildo. It’s very interesting.

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This horny man wants to be her sex toy

First she is playing with her sextoys but then the man offers to be the toy for her and she likes it alot.

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Stefania Mafra getting fucked in a Zoo!

Horny Stefania Mafra getting fucked in a Zoo! Beautiful Stefania fucking a black man with a big cock

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Tori Black and Keiran Lee having a good time

Tori Black and Keiran Lee are having a very good time together in the office. Her pussy tastes so good and she tasted his tasty cock as well.

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Ass worshiping all kind of sexy asses

Ass worship is what the guy behind the camera is doing. He just loves to see all those sexy asses in tight pants from up close.

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She sucks his dick before they have anal sex

Okee first clean your self up girl. So you can suck my dick before I will fuck you in your tiny asshole.

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After she sucks cock it’s time for pussy fuck

This sexy bitch is going to get her pussy fucked after she sucked his cock by an extremely well-muscled guy and they are going to love it.

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After she sucks cock it’s time for pussy fuck

He will stretch out her asshole a bit.

The first time this girl has anal sex and she seems to enjoy it a lot and the guy as well. Her anus is still very tight.

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Beautiful blonde teen fucked in POV

Young girl came all the way to L.A. to get freaky, she strips and shows her beautiful body to us and gives a blowjob in POV

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Big ass wife fucked hard in front of her man

Her husband likes to watch how his beautiful wife get’s fucked, and they other guy doesn’t mind doing him and her the favor.

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Milf fucks this young guy with her big boobs

This naughty MILF lay’s next to a young guy in bed and shortly after grabs his cock, her big boobs are perfect for a tit wank.

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Worship her amazing ass in pantyhose

Her booty looks so good in the black pantyhose and she knows it, she wants you to look at her ass and worship it.

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MILF in stockings teasing and talking dirty

A mature woman dressed in vintage lingerie is talking to you with a very seductive voice while showing her big ass and pussy to us.

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Student teen in uniform and big tits in need

The young girl has a problem with her sex life it’s too sensitive downstairs, she asks for help and of course he is willing to help.

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This MILF has big boobs and a big ass

Kendra Lust has an amazing body and she likes to seduce men, after she is done teasing she takes the cock in her mouth and pussy.

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Horny MILF playing with one of her toyboy’s

This mature woman loves to meet with one of her young toyboys, she is waiting for him while dressed in sexy lingerie and he just loves her big tits.

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Horny MILF playing with one of her toyboy’s

Big ass mature woman fucks security guard

A brunette MILF in prison sucks dick and rides the cock of her security guard and he shoots her down with cum.

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Coronavirus live updates: Hunt on for all passengers of cruise ship docked in Cambodia as one tests positive – CNBC

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1,100 Ex-Justice Officials Call On William Barr To Resign Amid Roger Stone Case – NPR

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Bernie Sanders is in a very weird position – CNN

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MS Westerdam Passenger’s Coronavirus Diagnosis Raises New Fears – The Daily Beast

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MS Westerdam Passenger’s Coronavirus Diagnosis Raises New Fears – The Daily Beast

Bloomberg argues he’s a ‘champion’ for women in the workplace amid scrutiny of past alleged sexist comments – CNN

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Bloomberg argues he’s a ‘champion’ for women in the workplace amid scrutiny of past alleged sexist comments – CNN

Warren faces pressure to revive fighter persona after ‘unity’ pitch falls flat – NBC News

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Flooding prompts state of emergency in Mississippi – ABC News

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Colorado avalanche: 2 men killed in large avalanche at Muddy Pass near Vail, Colorado – CBS News

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Police found more than 1,400 marijuana plants inside a building in Northern California – CNN

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Katie Waldman and Stephen Miller Wed at Trump Hotel – The New York Times

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Novel coronavirus death toll tops 1,770 as US passengers on quarantined cruise ship fly home – CNN

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Elton John cuts concert short in tears, says he’s suffering from walking pneumonia – USA TODAY

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Elton John cuts concert short in tears, says he’s suffering from walking pneumonia – USA TODAY

Second massive storm in two weeks hits North Atlantic and Western Europe – CBS News

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Yemen’s warring sides agree to ‘large-scale’ prisoner exchange – Al Jazeera English

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Holden killed by ‘highly fragmented right-hand-drive markets’ – Sky News Australia

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Holden killed by ‘highly fragmented right-hand-drive markets’ – Sky News Australia

Japan’s economy shrinks at fastest rate since 2014 – BBC News

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Japan’s economy shrinks at fastest rate since 2014 – BBC News

Mark Zuckerberg again calls for Big Tech to be regulated, even if it’s bad for business – MarketWatch

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WYDOT: 100+ Miles of I-80 to Stay Closed Through Monday Morning – K2 Radio

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Galaxy Z Flip durability test calls Samsung’s Ultra Thin ‘Glass’ into question – The Verge

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HQ Trivia’s Final Broadcast Was One Heck of a Wild Ride – IGN – IGN

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HQ Trivia’s Final Broadcast Was One Heck of a Wild Ride – IGN – IGN

Galaxy Z Flip: Selfie camera, one-handed use, early concerns (ongoing review) – CNET

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Rainbow Six Siege Will Be On PS5 And Xbox Series X At Launch With Cross-Gen Multiplayer – GameSpot

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ITV Cancels ‘Love Island’ Sunday Night After Caroline Flack’s Death – Showbiz Cheat Sheet

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ITV Cancels ‘Love Island’ Sunday Night After Caroline Flack’s Death – Showbiz Cheat Sheet

Could ‘Sonic the Hedgehog’ Speed Paramount’s Recovery at the Box Office? – TheWrap

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Could ‘Sonic the Hedgehog’ Speed Paramount’s Recovery at the Box Office? – TheWrap

Drew Carey’s Ex-Fiancee Amie Harwick Murdered in Hollywood Hills – TMZ

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Drew Carey’s Ex-Fiancee Amie Harwick Murdered in Hollywood Hills – TMZ

Justin Bieber Shaves Off His Mustache, Teases Its Return – TMZ

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NBA All-Star Game 2020 | Full Highlights – NBA

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How to watch Team Giannis vs. Team LeBron and the 2020 NBA All-Star game without cable – CNET

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NASCAR postpones Daytona 500 due to rain after Trump visit | TheHill – The Hill

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Rob Manfred Addresses Astros Scandal – MLB Trade Rumors

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Four Possible NASA Missions to Explore the Secrets of the Solar System – SciTechDaily

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In photos: See the Antares rocket’s Cygnus NG-13 cargo ship launch to space station – Space.com

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In photos: See the Antares rocket’s Cygnus NG-13 cargo ship launch to space station – Space.com

Astronaut Christina Koch reunites with dog after 328-day spaceflight – The Straits Times

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SpaceX Starlink: How to watch Falcon 9 launch 60 satellites to space Monday – CNET

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Coronavirus crisis: Australian expatriates in China describe how disease has changed their lives – Daily Mail

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Coronavirus: What’s still not known about COVID-19 – CBC News

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Coronavirus: What’s still not known about COVID-19 – CBC News

CDC reports 92 pediatric flu deaths, 2 in Kansas – WIBW

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CDC: Coronavirus spreads most easily when patients are sickest – Medical Xpress

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Coronavirus: Are African countries ready?

as confirmed its first case of the new coronavirus – heralding its entry into Africa, a continent with increasingly close ties to China where the virus originated.

The World Health Organization (WHO) has already declared the coronavirus outbreak a global health emergency – largely because of fears that poorer countries may not be able to cope with an outbreak.

“The main reason for this declaration is not what is happening in China but what is happening in other countries. Our greatest concern is the potential for the virus to spread to countries with weaker health systems,” said WHO chief Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, who is from Ethiopia.

The health systems in many African countries are already struggling with the existing workload, so can they deal with another outbreak of a highly infectious disease?

Michael Yao, WHO’s head of emergency operations in Africa, notes that some countries on the continent “have the minimum to start with – they’re not starting from scratch”.

“We know how fragile the health system is on the African continent and these systems are already overwhelmed by many ongoing disease outbreaks, so for us it is critical to detect earlier so that we can prevent the spread.”

What facilities are there at the moment to treat it?

Until early this week, there were only two laboratories in Africa – one in Senegal and the other in South Africa – which had the reagents needed to test samples. They have been working as referral laboratories for countries around the region.

One of the laboratories, Institut Pasteur de Dakar, in Senegal has long been on the front line in medical innovation in Africa, including in yellow fever research.

However this week Ghana, Madagascar, Nigeria and Sierra Leone have announced they can also conduct tests.

A member of staff works in a laboratory
Image captionThe Institut Pasteur de Dakar, in Senegal, is one of the laboratories that has the reagents needed to test samples

The WHO is also sending kits to 29 laboratories on the continent to ensure they have the capacity to deal with the virus and also help test samples from other countries if needed.

However it’s hoped that by later this month at least 36 African countries will be equipped to carry out tests specific to the coronavirus.

The ability of African nations to properly diagnose cases “depends on the new reagents being made available from China and Europe,” says Dr Yao.

The Nigerian Red Cross Society says it has placed one million volunteers on alert. Its Secretary General Abubakar Ahmed Kende said the measure was to prevent the possible spread of the virus into the country and also contain the spiralling outbreak of Lassa fever across the country.

In Tanzania, Health Minister Ummy Mwalimu announced that isolation centres in the north, east and west of the country had been identified. Thermometers have been stockpiled and more than 2,000 health workers have been trained.

Several countries including Kenya, Ethiopia, Ivory Coast, Ghana and Botswana have dealt with suspected cases, placing them in quarantine while tests were carried out. So far, all have tested negative for the virus.

Uganda’s health ministry confirmed it had quarantined more than 100 people who have arrived at Entebbe International Airport. Some of the people have been quarantined at two hospitals in Entebbe and Kampala, while others have been asked to stay in their homes.

Have any lessons been learned from Ebola?

Dr Yao was involved in dealing with the outbreaks of Ebola in West Africa in 2014-2016 and more recently in the east of the Democratic Republic of Congo. He said he was concerned that there was not enough capacity to treat critical cases of coronavirus.

“We’re advising countries to at least detect cases early to avoid spreading the new virus within the community – that will be difficult to manage,” he says.

On a positive note, many African countries were already screening passengers arriving at their ports of entry for Ebola. Countries that dealt with the Ebola outbreak still have the isolation facilities and expertise in controlling infectious diseases.

But when it comes to detection, Ebola is different to the coronavirus. Ebola only became infectious when symptoms showed however there have been reports that in some cases, the coronavirus may have been transmitted before patients were showing symptoms.

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Learn more about the new virus

Viruses
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What about travel between the continent and China?

Increasingly close trade links between China and African countries have heightened concerns that the virus could spread.

China is Africa’s biggest trade partner and around 10,000 Chinese firms are currently operating throughout the continent. According to Chinese state media, more than one million Chinese nationals live in African countries.

There are also more than 80,000 African students in China, often attracted by government scholarships, reports the Guardian. A 21-year-old student from Cameroon was reported to have contracted the virus after a trip to Wuhan and is being treated in hospital.

Chinese students are also travelling to the continent, attracted again by government scholarships.

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‘Thousands of African students stranded in coronavirus province’

Danny Vincent, BBC News, Hong Kong

Students like Zambian Tisiliyani Salima have been in self-imposed quarantine for more than two weeks.

Every morning she wakes up to news of scores of more deaths and thousands of new cases of infections in Wuhan.

Despite the draconian measures taken across the city, there is little sign that the spread of the infection is slowing.

The argument that China is better equipped to deal with the outbreak of the coronavirus than African student’s home nations does little to calm the anxieties of many of the African students living in the surrounding province, Hubei.

There are thought to be thousands of Africans living across the province where the virus originated.

Students from Nigeria, Zambia, Tanzania, Cameroon and Ivory Coast are starting to lose hope that their governments will listen to their calls to be evacuated.

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As trade links continue to increase, so does the volume of traffic between the continent and China. The number of passengers is now a concern.

Dr John Nkengasong, director of the Africa Centres for Disease Control and Prevention, wrote in the journal Nature that the rapid spread of the coronavirus in Asia as a result of air traffic and vast population movements, should be of significance in Africa.

The 2002 outbreak of the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (Sars) largely spared the continent with only one imported case reported in South Africa “but air traffic between China and Africa has risen by over 600% in the past decade as a result of the rapid expansion of Chinese investment in Africa”, he writes.

A passenger walks past a coronavirus health sign in South Sudan
Image captionCountries in Africa are on high alert as the coronavirus continues to spread

Many airlines across the world have suspended flights to and from China. In response, airlines in Africa have been under intense public pressure to halt flights. The airlines of Egypt, Kenya, Morocco and Rwanda have halted flights but the continent’s biggest airline – Ethiopian Airlines – has carried on with operations.

The WHO has advised against travel restrictions and instead identified 13 top priority countries in Africa, which because of their direct links or high volume of travel to China need to be particularly vigilant. It plans to have support staff in all 13 countries by the end of the week.

“A new and unknown virus is often scary and many people are worried,” says Dr Matshidiso Moeti, WHO’s regional head for Africa. “But all efforts to combat the novel coronavirus must be based on sound science.”

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Global fashion industry facing a ‘nightmare’

oods makers are anticipating significant losses due to the coronavirus outbreak, while High Street retailers could see new collections delayed by months.

The global fashion industry is worth £2tn ($1.5tn) and it brings the UK more than £30bn a year in revenues.

According to investment bank Jefferies, Chinese consumers make up 80% of growth in the market.

“It’s a nightmare,” said Flavio Cereda, a managing director at Jeffries.

The power of the Chinese consumer has grown over the last decade and now accounts for 38% of the global fashion industry. In comparison, in 2003, during the Sars epidemic, the Chinese consumer accounted for only about 8% of the market.

And until 23 January, sales forecasts for 2020 were looking good.

But with some Chinese cities now on full or partial lockdown and a spike in new cases – as of Friday, 63,922 confirmed cases of coronavirus and 1,381 deaths – shopping malls are deserted, workers are at home, and the luxury goods industry is seriously worried.

There have been profit warnings from Burberry, Ralph Lauren, Coach and Kate Spade owner Tapestry, Moncler and Capri Holdings – the parent firm of brands like Versace, Michael Kors and Jimmy Choo.

“We’ve never seen a situation like this, where sales go to zero. And it affects everybody, whether you’re a big or small brand,” Mr Cereda told the BBC.

“We’re looking at at least four months of very painful trading figures.”

Mr Cereda thinks that there will definitely be a recovery, as there is a lot of “pent up demand” to spend from Chinese consumers, and that spend is crucial to continued growth in the global fashion industry. But his guess is that it could take until the summer for consumer confidence to pick up again.

People queue up outside the Louis Vuitton store at a mall in Shenzhen, China
Image captionChinese consumers now make up 38% of the global fashion market

“Chinese shoppers have a lot of money to spend nowadays,” Maria Marlone, a principal lecturer at Manchester Metropolitan University’s Fashion Institute told BBC Radio 5 Live’s Wake Up to Money programme.

“So whether they come over to the UK to shop and spend here, or they go up there into their own cities and shop for UK brands over there, it’s going to cause a problem, because there’s just no product and there’s nobody there to retail the product.”

“Not only have you got the problem of getting product out of China… you’ve also got the closure of UK companies’ hub offices that are based in China, and they’re quite big operations.”

At London Fashion Week 2020 over the last few days, Chinese buyers have been missing and they most likely won’t be at Milan Fashion Week on 18 February, added Mr Cereda.

Manufacturing impact on retailers

High Street retailers will not be spared the impact of the coronovirus outbreak either. Some retailers have stores overseas in mainland China and southeast Asia, but even without an Asian presence, a lot of manufacturing is still carried out in China.

UK retailers are now facing delays to their spring fashion collections of at least four to six weeks, at a conservative estimate, according to retail expert Kate Hardcastle.

Ms Marlone agrees: “If products haven’t been on the seas a few weeks ago, there is going to be a delay – they reckon maybe up to two or three months, and if there’s going to be that much, then you have to question whether the customers are going to want it at that stage.”

“High quality goods like Burberry and John Smedley are still manufactured in the UK, but mid-range quality like M&S have been chucked out to China a few years ago.”

People walk past Marks & Spencer in Hong Kong
Image captionA lot of manufacturing for some retailers is now carried out in China

London-based clothing and fabric manufacturer ApparelTasker says that the closure of Chinese factories and wider uncertainty is benefiting its business.

The firm says that it charges double the amount it would cost to have items manufactured in China.

“Today alone I’ve had five or six orders placed with me, based on the uncertainty of China’s delivery windows, on the back of the coronavirus. All of it is by London Fashion Week designers,” ApparelTasker’s founder Zack Sartor told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme.

Ms Hardcastle is worried about the impact delays in product deliveries will have on High Street that is already reeling from a dismal Christmas.

“Spring and summer collections create a spike of interest online and in stores – usually more colourful than the autumn and winter colours before them – they help drive important online dwell time and in-store visits,” she said.

Consumers want to buy into trends as soon as they see them, and want products in shops to always look “fresh and new”, which will be a struggle if the delivery delays continue.

“Retailers don’t have much capacity for further issues – there are still 70-80% discounted stock loitering on websites, even premium fashion sites.”

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Coronavirus: Beijing orders 14-day quarantine for returnees

jing has ordered everyone returning to the city to go into quarantine for 14 days or risk punishment in the latest attempt to contain the deadly new coronavirus, state media report.

Residents were told to “self-quarantine or go to designated venues to quarantine” after returning to the Chinese capital from holidays.

The measure came as Egypt confirmed the first coronavirus case in Africa.

Over 1,500 people have died from the virus, which originated in Wuhan city.

The notice on Friday from Beijing’s virus prevention working group was issued as residents returned from spending the Lunar New Year in other parts of China.

The holiday was extended this year to help contain the outbreak.

More than 20 million people live in Beijing.

China’s national health commission on Saturday reported 143 new deaths, bringing the toll to 1,523. All but four of the latest victims were in hard-hit Hubei province.

A further 2,641 people have been newly confirmed as infected, bringing the national total to 66,492.

Outside mainland China, there have been more than 500 cases in 24 countries, and three deaths: one each in Hong Kong, the Philippines and Japan.

A World Health Organization (WHO)-led mission to China will start its outbreak investigation work this weekend, focusing on how the virus – officially named Covid-19 – is spreading and its severity, director Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said.

The mission, including international experts, will also look at how and when more than 1,700 health workers contracted the virus.

The team consists of 12 international members and their 12 Chinese counterparts.

“Particular attention will be paid to understanding transmission of the virus, the severity of disease and the impact of ongoing response measures,” said Dr Mike Ryan, executive director of the WHO health emergencies programme.

Africa sees its first case

Egypt’s health ministry on Friday confirmed the first case of the coronavirus in Africa.

The ministry described the person as a foreigner, but did not disclose the nationality.

It said it had notified the WHO, and the patient had been placed in isolation in a hospital.

Experts had earlier warned that it may not be long before the first case was confirmed in Africa, given its increasingly close ties to China.

Chinese health workers die in the outbreak

Chinese officials say six health workers have died.

Zeng Yixin, vice minister of China’s National Health Commission, said 1,102 medical workers had been infected in Wuhan and another 400 in other parts of Hubei province.

“The duties of medical workers at the front are indeed extremely heavy; their working and resting circumstances are limited, the psychological pressures are great, and the risk of infection is high,” Mr Zeng said, as quoted by Reuters news agency.

Media captionMedics in Wuhan resort to shaving their heads in a bid to prevent cross-infection of the coronavirus

Local authorities have struggled to provide protective equipment such as respiratory masks, goggles and protective suits in hospitals in the area.

On 7 February, the plight of medical workers was highlighted by the death of Li Wenliang, a doctor at Wuhan Central Hospital who had tried to issue the first warning about the virus on 30 December.

He had sent out a warning to fellow medics but police told him to stop “making false comments”.

A wave of anger and grief flooded Chinese social media site Weibo when news of Dr Li’s death broke.

What are the other developments?

  • In the UK, health officials contacted hundreds of people who attended a conference in London, after it emerged that one of them was diagnosed with coronavirus
  • China said it would stagger the return of children to school – several provinces have closed schools until the end of February
  • In Vietnam, which borders China, thousands of people in villages near the capital, Hanoi, have been put under quarantine after several cases were discovered. Vietnam has now confirmed at least 16 cases
  • The Red Cross has called for sanctions relief for North Korea, which would allow the aid agency to transfer funds to buy equipment. Testing kits and protective clothing are urgently needed to prepare for a possible outbreak, it says

Read more about the coronavirus and its impact


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Coronavirus: Australian evacuated from China to Christmas Island for quarantine

cuated from China to Christmas Island for quarantine

Daniel Ou Yang is one of many Australians being evacuated from Wuhan in China.

The student, who was in the city visiting family when the coronavirus outbreak happened, documented his experience on TikTok as the city was put on lockdown.

He has since been put on a flight to New Zealand, where he would then be transferred to Christmas Island, a remote island that belongs to Australia, for quarantine.

Australian evacuees will have to stay there for 14 days before being allowed to return to the mainland.

Daniel spoke to the BBC before he boarded his flight about his uncertainty of quarantine, and said he would have preferred to stay “anywhere else” in Australia.

  • 05 Feb 2020

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Coronavirus outbreak: Chinese medics shave heads

ronavirus outbreak: Chinese medics shave heads

Medics in Wuhan have been shaving their heads in a bid to prevent cross-infection of the coronavirus.

Tens of thousands of people in China have been diagnosed with Covid-19 and it has spread to several other countries.

  • 13 Feb 2020

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The Chinese doctor who tried to warn others about coronavirus

enliang, who was hailed a hero for raising the alarm about the coronavirus in the early days of the outbreak, has died of the infection.

His death was confirmed by the Wuhan hospital where he worked and was being treated, following conflicting reports about his condition on state media.

Dr Li, 34, tried to send a message to fellow medics about the outbreak at the end of December. Three days later police paid him a visit and told him to stop. He returned to work and caught the virus from a patient. He had been in hospital for at least three weeks.

He posted his story from his hospital bed last month on social media site Weibo.

“Hello everyone, this is Li Wenliang, an ophthalmologist at Wuhan Central Hospital,” the post begins.

It was a stunning insight into the botched response by local authorities in Wuhan in the early weeks of the coronavirus outbreak.

Dr Li was working at the centre of the outbreak in December when he noticed seven cases of a virus that he thought looked like Sars – the virus that led to a global epidemic in 2003. The cases were thought to come from the Huanan Seafood market in Wuhan and the patients were in quarantine in his hospital.

On 30 December he sent a message to fellow doctors in a chat group warning them about the outbreak and advising they wear protective clothing to avoid infection.

What Dr Li didn’t know then was that the disease that had been discovered was an entirely new coronavirus.

Dr Li's post on Weibo
Image captionAfter falling sick, Dr Li said on Weibo that he wondered why authorities were still saying no medical staff had been infected

Four days later he was summoned to the Public Security Bureau where he was told to sign a letter. In the letter he was accused of “making false comments” that had “severely disturbed the social order”.

“We solemnly warn you: If you keep being stubborn, with such impertinence, and continue this illegal activity, you will be brought to justice – is that understood?” Underneath in Dr Li’s handwriting is written: “Yes, I do.”

He was one of eight people who police said were being investigated for “spreading rumours”.

At the end of January, Dr Li published a copy of the letter on Weibo and explained what had happened. In the meantime, local authorities had apologised to him but that apology came too late.

For the first few weeks of January officials in Wuhan were insisting that only those who came into contact with infected animals could catch the virus. No guidance was issued to protect doctors.

But just a week after his visit from the police, Dr Li was treating a woman with glaucoma. He didn’t know that she had been infected with the new coronavirus.

The letter that Dr Li says police told him to sign saying he made false comments
Image caption”We hope you can calm down and reflect on your behaviour,” the letter police told him to sign says

In his Weibo post he describes how on 10 January he started coughing, the next day he had a fever and two days later he was in hospital. His parents also fell ill and were taken to hospital.

It was 10 days later – on 20 January – that China declared the outbreak an emergency.

Dr Li says he was tested several times for coronavirus, all of them came back negative.

Dr Li Wenliang
Image captionDr Li Wenliang was accused of spreading rumours

On 30 January he posted again: “Today nucleic acid testing came back with a positive result, the dust has settled, finally diagnosed.”

He punctuated the short post with an emoji of a dog with its eyes rolled back, tongue hanging out.

Not surprisingly the post received thousands of comments and words of support.

“Dr Li Wenliang is a hero,” one user said, worrying about what his story says about their country. “In the future, doctors will be more afraid to issue early warnings when they find signs of infectious diseases.”

“A safer public health environment… requires tens of millions of Li Wenliang.”

Media captionAerial time-lapse shows a Wuhan hospital being built in 10 days

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China launches coronavirus ‘close contact detector’ app

isk of catching the coronavirus.

The ‘close contact detector’ tells users if they have been near a person who has been confirmed or suspected of having the virus.

People identified as being at risk are advised to stay at home and inform local health authorities.

The technology shines a light on the Chinese government’s close surveillance of its population.

To make an inquiry users scan a Quick Response (QR) code on their smartphones using apps like the payment service Alipay or social media platform WeChat.

Once the new app is registered with a phone number, users are asked to enter their name and ID number. Every registered phone number can then be used to check the status of up to three ID numbers.

The app was jointly developed by government departments and the China Electronics Technology Group Corporation and supported by data from health and transport authorities, according to the state-run news agency Xinhua.

It is widely known that the Chinese government conducts high levels of surveillance on its citizens but experts in the field suggest, in this case at least, it will not be seen as controversial within the country.

Screen grabs of China's new coronavirus 'close contact detector' app.
Image captionChina’s new coronavirus ‘close contact’ app can be accessed via apps like Alipay or WeChat

Hong Kong-based technology lawyer at the law firm DLA Piper Carolyn Bigg told the BBC: “In China, and across Asia, data is not seen as something to be locked down, it’s something that can be used. Provided it’s done in a transparent way, with consent where needed.”

“From a Chinese perspective this is a really useful service for people… It’s a really powerful tool that really shows the power of data being used for good,” she added.

The Chinese government defines ‘close contact’ as coming near to, with no effective protection, confirmed, suspected or mild cases of the coronavirus while the person was ill, even if they were showing no symptoms at the time.

‘Close contact’ covers:

  • People who work closely together, share a classroom, or live in the same home
  • Medical staff, family members or other people who have been in close contact with patients and their caregivers
  • Passengers and crew who have been on planes, trains and other forms of transport with an infected person

For example, all air passengers within three rows of an infected person, as well as cabin staff, are seen as being in close contact, while other passengers would be recorded as having general contact.

When it comes to air-conditioned trains, all passengers and crew m

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Coronavirus and oil: Why crude has been hit hard

th the fallout of the coronavirus.

Representatives of oil producers’ cartel Opec and its allies are expected to meet this week as calls grow for action to support oil prices.

The cost of crude has hit its lowest level in a year after falling 20% since its peak in January.

Why have global oil prices fallen so much?

The spread of the coronavirus means the Lunar New Year holiday has been extended in much of China and travel restrictions are in place. As a result, factories, offices and shops remain shut.

That means the world’s biggest importer of crude oil, which usually consumes about 14 million barrels a day, needs a lot less oil to power machinery, fuel vehicles, and keep the lights on.

The outbreak is likely to have a particularly large impact on demand for jet fuel as airlines around the world suspend flights to China, and travel restrictions within the country mean far fewer flights.

Brent crude oil price

Bloomberg reported this week that China’s daily crude consumption had slumped by 20%, the equivalent of the UK and Italy’s oil needs combined.

In response, Asia’s largest oil refiner Sinopec, which is owned by the Chinese government, has cut the amount of crude it is processing by about 600,000 barrels per day, or 12%, its biggest cut in more than a decade.

The scale of the fall has shocked the energy industry, according to Chicago-based oil analyst Phil Flynn: “We have not seen a demand destruction event of this scale that moves this quickly.”

What does this tell us about the outbreak’s impact on the global economy?

The sharp fall in oil demand is a clear symptom of a drop in business activity in China and a sign that the country’s economic growth, which was already at a three decade low, will slow further.

Zhang Ming, an economist at government-backed think-tank the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, has said the outbreak could push the country’s annual economic growth below 5% for the first three months of the year.

China is the world’s second largest economy and a key engine of global economic growth. Any negative impact in China is almost certain to ripple across the world.

This week the managing director of the International Monetary Fund, Kristalina Georgieva, said the epidemic was likely to slow world economic growth in at least the short term, but cautioned that it was still too early to tell further ahead: “We have to assess how quickly action is being taken to contain the spread of coronavirus and how effective this action is.”

What are oil producers expected to do?

The world’s biggest oil producers are said to be discussing more production cuts, on top of those which have been in place since 2016, to boost falling prices.

On Monday, Opec member Iran publicly called for measures to support oil prices as the coronavirus hit demand.

The statement came as so-called Opec+, which includes Russia, will reportedly discuss output cuts of between 500,000 and one million barrels a day at a meeting that is expected to take place this week.

Margaret Yang from CMC Markets said the market was expecting production to be cut by a 500,000 barrels a day, but added: “We won’t rule out an even deeper cut should the situation worsen.”View comments93

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Coronavirus and oil: Why crude has been hit hard

ith the fallout of the coronavirus.

Representatives of oil producers’ cartel Opec and its allies are expected to meet this week as calls grow for action to support oil prices.

The cost of crude has hit its lowest level in a year after falling 20% since its peak in January.

Why have global oil prices fallen so much?

The spread of the coronavirus means the Lunar New Year holiday has been extended in much of China and travel restrictions are in place. As a result, factories, offices and shops remain shut.

That means the world’s biggest importer of crude oil, which usually consumes about 14 million barrels a day, needs a lot less oil to power machinery, fuel vehicles, and keep the lights on.

The outbreak is likely to have a particularly large impact on demand for jet fuel as airlines around the world suspend flights to China, and travel restrictions within the country mean far fewer flights.

Brent crude oil price

Bloomberg reported this week that China’s daily crude consumption had slumped by 20%, the equivalent of the UK and Italy’s oil needs combined.

In response, Asia’s largest oil refiner Sinopec, which is owned by the Chinese government, has cut the amount of crude it is processing by about 600,000 barrels per day, or 12%, its biggest cut in more than a decade.

The scale of the fall has shocked the energy industry, according to Chicago-based oil analyst Phil Flynn: “We have not seen a demand destruction event of this scale that moves this quickly.”

What does this tell us about the outbreak’s impact on the global economy?

The sharp fall in oil demand is a clear symptom of a drop in business activity in China and a sign that the country’s economic growth, which was already at a three decade low, will slow further.

Zhang Ming, an economist at government-backed think-tank the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, has said the outbreak could push the country’s annual economic growth below 5% for the first three months of the year.

China is the world’s second largest economy and a key engine of global economic growth. Any negative impact in China is almost certain to ripple across the world.

This week the managing director of the International Monetary Fund, Kristalina Georgieva, said the epidemic was likely to slow world economic growth in at least the short term, but cautioned that it was still too early to tell further ahead: “We have to assess how quickly action is being taken to contain the spread of coronavirus and how effective this action is.”

What are oil producers expected to do?

The world’s biggest oil producers are said to be discussing more production cuts, on top of those which have been in place since 2016, to boost falling prices.

On Monday, Opec member Iran publicly called for measures to support oil prices as the coronavirus hit demand.

The statement came as so-called Opec+, which includes Russia, will reportedly discuss output cuts of between 500,000 and one million barrels a day at a meeting that is expected to take place this week.

Margaret Yang from CMC Markets said the market was expecting production

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Coronavirus: ‘I walk around my block of flats to stay sane’

etimes I get cabin fever, but I already did the fire escape up-and-down walk and we have 43 floors here.”

While Jeffrey Broer is enjoying working from home as he gets to spend more time with his young daughter Dansha, it’s beginning to take its toll.

A self-employed investment adviser and lecturer at Hong Kong University, he has been working from home full time since the Lunar New Year holiday as companies take measures to help prevent the spread of coronavirus.

While he has been conducting video sessions with his students from his home office, he misses the face-to-face contact and networking.

“That’s almost impossible now. The windowsill is my friend,” he says.

While at first he didn’t miss the 20-minute commute into work every day, his attitude has changed. “I am looking forward to it again, although that might be the cabin fever talking,” he joked.

Millions of people have been working from home across China and further afield, as the government introduces more measures to contain the deadly virus.

Many are enjoying the opportunity to spend time with their families or catch up with old friends online, and some are finding it a more productive way of working.

Shanghai-based Henry Chang is a big fan of working from home and is using video conferencing tools such as Zoom and Google Meet to collaborate with his colleagues in the UK.

“It’s quite good actually,” says the China market manager for language learning site Lingumi. “Without colleagues to chat around, you actually spend more time concentrating on work if you clearly know what needs to be done.”

Fan Yi working from home
Image captionFan Yi says she is “lucky” to be stuck indoors

His colleague Fan Yi is also enjoying working from home in the city, but has sympathy for those not so fortunate.

“I worry more about people who are impacted by this virus, especially people in Wuhan, after I read the news. I feel lucky to just be stuck indoors, compared to their panic and things they’re suffering,” she says.

Work-life balance

Rajashree Basu, who works at a language school in Wuxi, about 135km from Shanghai, struggled at first with the lack of contact with her students. But she too has turned to video conferencing tools and says they work well.

“Initially it was challenging, but now as time goes on, everyone is getting charged up as they see the digital platforms work and provide similar results to face-to-face classrooms.

“Sometimes I feel I’m able to get more done in this mode and give more support to students and teachers.”

Ms Basu is currently stuck in her home city of Kolkata, India, after returning during the Chinese New Year break. Her major issues have been internet usage, connectivity and working out time differences when calling colleagues.

“Setting a work-life balance while working from home sometimes is challenging as well,” she adds.

Chinese officials have told schools not to re-open until at least March, although Ms Basu fears “it might take another extra month or so”.

Alvin Foo working from home
Image captionAlvin Foo says the experience has been positive

Alvin Foo is working from his apartment in Shanghai and relishes the freedom it gives him.

“Almost anything can be done remotely, the issue is really on the effectiveness,” says the managing director of advertising agency IPG Mediabrands Reprise.

Technology is playing a major role in helping him connect with his team so they can still hold meetings remotely.

“The positive thing about this working from home experiment is that it will help us to collaborate better and develop future strategies to work from anywhere for the company,” he says.

“With the proliferation of faster internet through 5G, it will game-change the future of work.”

Another positive he sees from working from home is being able to spend quality time with loved ones.

“Besides my family, I keep myself busy with reading and reaching out to old friends that I haven’t been in touch with for years.

“The extra time has definitely created an opportunity for families to be

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Are coronavirus tests flawed?

deep concerns laboratory tests are incorrectly telling people they are free of the coronavirus.

Stories in several countries suggest people are having up to six negative results before finally being diagnosed.

Meanwhile, officials in the epicentre of the epidemic, Hubei province, China, have started counting people with symptoms rather than using the tests for final confirmation.

As a result, nearly 15,000 new cases were reported on a single day – a quarter of all cases in this epidemic.

What are these tests and is there a problem with them?

They work by looking for the genetic code of the virus.

A sample is taken from the patient. Then, in the laboratory, the virus’s genetic code (if it’s there) is extracted and repeatedly copied, making tiny quantities vast and detectable.

These “RT-PCR” tests, widely used in medicine to diagnose viruses such as HIV and influenza, are normally highly reliable.

“They are very robust tests generally, with a low false-positive and a low false-negative rate,” Dr Nathalie MacDermott, of King’s College London, says.

But are things going wrong?

A study in the journal Radiology showed five out of 167 patients tested negative for the disease despite lung scans showing they were ill. They then tested positive for the virus at a later date.

And there are numerous anecdotal accounts.

These include that of Dr Li Wenliang, who first raised concerns about the disease and has been hailed as a hero in China after dying from it.

Dr Li shares a picture of himself in a gas mask from his hospital bed in Wuhan on Friday
Image captionDr Li posted a picture of himself on social media from his hospital bed, on 31 Jan. The next day, he said, he had been diagnosed for coronavirus

He said his test results had come back negative on multiple occasions before he had finally been diagnosed.

Chinese journalists have uncovered other cases of people testing negative six times before a seventh test confirmed they had the disease.

And similar issues have been raised in other affected countries, including Singapore and Thailand.

In the US, meanwhile, Dr Nancy Messonnier, of the the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, says some of its tests are producing “inconclusive” results.

What might be going on?

One possible explanation is the tests are accurate and the patients do not have coronavirus at the time of testing

It is also cough, cold and flu season in China and patients may confuse these illnesses for coronavirus.

“The early signs of coronavirus are very similar to other respiratory viruses,” Dr MacDermott says.

“Maybe they weren’t infected when first tested.

“Then, over the course of time, they became infected and later tested positive for the coronavirus. That’s a possibility.”

Another option is the patients do have the coronavirus but it is at such an early stage, there is not enough to detect.

Even though RT-PCR tests massively expand the amount of genetic material, they need something to work from.

“But that doesn’t make sense after six tests,” Dr MacDermott says.

“With Ebola, we always waited 72 hours after a negative result to give the virus time.”

Throat swab

Alternatively, there could be a problem with the way the tests are being conducted.

There are throat swabs and then there are throat swabs.

“Is it a dangle or a good rub?” asks Dr MacDermott.

And if the samples are not correctly stored and handled, the test may not work.

There has also been some discussion about whether doctors testing the back of the throat are looking in the wrong place.

This is a deep lung infection rather one in the nose and throat.

However, if a patient is coughing, then some virus should be being 

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Why there could be many identical copies of you

  • Melissa Hogenboom and Pierangelo Pirak

24 October 2016

This story is nominated for a Webby Award for Best Film & Video. Vote here.

BBC Earth is also nominated for a Webby, for Best Science Website. Vote here.

In theory this is not the only Universe that might exist, and in many others, identical copies of us can be found.

The question is, how do we get there? 

BBC Earth’s Melissa Hogenboom goes on the hunt for her cosmic twin.

Melissa Hogenboom is BBC Earth’s feature writer. She is @melissasuzanneh on Twitter. Video produced by Pierangelo Pirak; he is @ppirak on twitter. 

Join over five million BBC Earth fans by liking us on Facebook, or follow us on Twitter and Instagram.

If you liked this story, sign up for the weekly bbc.com features newsletter called “If You Only Read 6 Things This Week”. A handpicked selection of stories from BBC Future, Earth, Culture, Capital, Travel and Autos, delivered to your inbox every Friday.

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Why the vegan diet is not always green

e vegan diet is widely regarded to be better for the planet than those that include animal products, but not all plant-based foodstuffs have a small environmental footprint.

By Richard Gray13th February 2020

It has all the makings of a delicious smoothie – a dollop of almond butter, an avocado, a few slices of mango, a handful of blueberries, a sprinkle of cocoa powder and perhaps a glug of soya milk.

As a tasty, vegan-friendly drink to start your day, it is packed with nutrients and will do wonders for your health. But it may be doing far less good for the planet.

There is no doubt that meat – beef in particular – makes an unsurpassable contribution to the planet’s greenhouse gas emissions. It also devours more land and water and causes more environmental damagethan any other single food product. The recent rigorous report by the EAT-Lancet Commission recommends reducing our consumption of animal products to not only benefit human health, but the health of our planet. Even the “greenest” sources of meat still produce more greenhouse gases than plant-based proteins.

But anyone looking to adopt a vegan or vegetarian diet for environmental reasons may also want to consider whether there are some plant-based foods that also come with a heavy price.

“Nothing really compares to beef, lamb, pork, and dairy – these products are in a league of their own in the level of damage they typically do to the environment, on almost every environmental issue we track,” says Joseph Poore, a researcher at the University of Oxford who studies the environmental impacts of food. “But it’s essential to be mindful about everything we consume: air-transported fruit and veg can create more greenhouse gas emissions per kilogram than poultry meat, for example.”

Delicate fruits like blueberries and strawberries, for example, are often imported to Europe and the US by air to fill gaps left when local fruit are out of season. Research by Angelina Frankowska, who studies sustainability at the University of Manchester, recently found that asparagus eaten in the UK has the highest carbon footprint compared to any other vegetable eaten in the country, with 5.3kg of carbon dioxide being produced for every kilogram of asparagus, mainly because much of it is imported by air from Peru. She and her colleagues found, in fact, that the succulent green stalks have the largest environmental footprint of any of the 56 vegetables they looked at, including its land use and water use (which was three times greater than the next highest).

More from The Vegan Season on BBC Good Food

Without carefully considering where our food comes from and how it is grown, our diets can have unintended consequences. Take the strange case of two vegans in an Italian study who were found to have an environmental impact considerably higher than many meat-eaters. When the researchers dug a little further, they discovered the pair exclusively ate fruit.

“They ate a huge quantity of fruits,” explains Francesca Scazzina, an expert on human nutrition at the University of Parma, Italy. “In fact, I remember [it was] 7-8kg (15.4 to17.6lb)  per day of fruit. We collected their data in the summer so they especially ate watermelons and cantaloupes.”

 The water, land and carbon footprint of growing and transporting such large, perishable fruit meant the environmental impact was far larger than they had expected. Once the data from all 153 vegans, vegetarians and omnivores in the study was taken into account, however, it showed that eating meat was on average worse for the environment.

Fruit may be healthy, but it can come with a high carbon cost (Credit: Getty Images)

But there are other general points to consider when we think about food crops that can drive up the environmental impact. Artificial fertilisers, for example, account for at least 3% of global greenhouse gas emissions, according to the industry. The production of synthetic fertiliser emits carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane into the atmosphere, while their use on fields releases nitrous oxide, another potent greenhouse gas.

Agricultural practices such as the tilling of fields also releases large volumes of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere and helps to speed up erosion.

These all combine to differing degrees depending on the crop, but there are clearly some plant-based foods that have a disproportionate impact on the environment. Here BBC Future takes a look at some of the worst offenders:

Avocado

The rich green flesh of this fruit is being smashed, blended and chopped in hipster cafes, smart restaurants and home kitchens around the world. Avocadoes can be an important source of protein, vitamins and fatty acids for people cutting out meat from their diet.

But they also guzzle up huge amounts of water. A single mature tree in California, for example, needs up to 209 litres (46 gallons) every day in the summer – more than would fill a large bathtub. It is a staggering amount in the dry summer months in water-stressed regions such as California, Chile, Mexico and southern Spain, where many commercial avocado crops are grown, and puts huge pressure on the local environment.

A kilogram of mangoes requires 686 litres (150 gallons) of water while the same amount of plums needs 305 litres (67 gallons)

Adapted to hot, moist rainforest climates, their roots are relatively shallow and poor at searching out water held within the soil. It means they need to be continually irrigated if there is little rain.

To grow a single avocado it has been estimated to take anything from 140 litres (30 gallons) to 272 litres (60 gallons) of water – or about 834 litres (183 gallons) per kilogram of fruit. In some areas, like Peru and Chile, the growing demand for the crop has led to illegal extraction from rivers and has been blamed for an increasing water-shortage crisis.

Avocadoes are not alone in their extreme water use. Other fruit such as mangoes and plums also suck up large amounts too. A kilogram of mangoes requires 686 litres (150 gallons) of water while the same amount of plums needs 305 litres (67 gallons).

There is cause for hope though – one farmer in California claims to have reduced the amount of water he uses by 75% thanks to wireless soil moisture sensors that monitor the ground around his trees and ensure the precious liquid is only delivered where and when it is needed.

After harvesting, however, avocadoes and mangoes are also bathed in hot water for over an hour to prevent insect infestations and control decay. Their highly delicate flesh and rapid ripening also means that much of the fruit imported to Europe and the US is flown there by air.

Together with the amount of waste, special storage conditions and packaging needed for avocados, this helps to give the fruit a hefty carbon footprint – the equivalent of 2.2kg of CO2/kg for avocados imported to the UK according to one study. It also estimated mangoes emitted 4.4kg of CO2/kg.

A detailed analysis by researchers at the University of Michigan’s Center for Sustainable Systems, however, which gathered data from around the world and takes into account other aspects of food such as packaging and the amount of waste created during production and transport, puts the global carbon footprint of avocados at 0.55kg of CO2/kg while mangoes come out at just 0.6kg of CO2/kg. These figures may be lower because not all countries have to freight their fruit by air to get it fresh.

Mushrooms

From dark rooms filled with steaming piles of compost buds a mainstay of the vegan diet. Mushrooms are a rich source of nutrients and, with the exception of bizarre debates over how vegan some mushrooms really are – oyster mushrooms are “predatory’’ and secrete sticky toxins to catch nematode worms which they digest to obtain vital nitrogen – they are considered to be a very good meat substitute. They are commonly used in many meat-free alternatives.

And from a climate change point of view, they make an ideal meat replacement, producing just a fraction of beef’s emissions. But for a crop that flourishes without light by feeding on rotting organic waste, they can have a surprising impact.

Most of the emissions come from the energy needed to keep the rooms where mushrooms are cultivated warm

One study, funded by the US Department of Agriculture, showed that producing a kilogram of Agaricus bisporus – the common button, chestnut and portobello mushrooms we buy in the shops – emits 2.13-2.95kg of CO2, while the US Mushroom Council says a kilogram of mushrooms produces less than 0.7kg of CO2.

Most of the emissions come from the energy needed to keep the rooms where mushrooms are cultivated warm. Growing rooms and compost need to reach temperatures of up to 62C, depending on the system being used, in order for the mushrooms to grow.

But carbon dioxide is also produced by the mushrooms themselves as they respire and grow. Much of this is kept inside sealed rooms where the carbon dioxide concentrations are carefully controlled. Different mushrooms will grow at different sizes and shapes depending on the CO2 concentrations and at times varieties can require CO2 levels that are up to 48 times higher than the outside air. At times, excessive CO2 is often exchanged with fresh air.

Analysis by the University of Michigan found cultivated mushrooms produced 3kg of CO2/kg on average. Still far less than beef. And less than the “greenest” farmed meat – chicken – which produced 4.1kg of CO2/kg by their calculations. But it came out the same as saltwater fish and more than tuna, which release 3kg of CO2/kg and 2.2kg of CO2/kg respectively. Of course, fishing has its own environmental and biodiversity issues on top of that, though.

Much of the carbon footprint of mushrooms comes from the heat needed to grow them indoors (Credit: Getty Images)

One further consideration is the use of peat in many of the composts used by the mushroom industry. Unless extracted sustainably, this can damage delicate bog ecosystems and deplete their ability to store carbon in the future.

But there are hopes that by using more food and agricultural waste to create sustainable compost substrates for mushrooms to grow in, using the material left after harvesting to make biodegradable packaging, and piping carbon dioxide into greenhouses to grow plant-based crops, it may be possible for mushrooms to become truly green.

Mycoprotein

Another popular meat substitute grown from fungi, mycoprotein has some surprising environmental impacts. Making it uses a fraction of the land compared to chicken, pork or beef, but the carbon footprint is estimated to be 5.55-6.15kg CO2/kg by one study. More than half of this, however, comes from processing after the fungi produces the protein – some vegetarian mycoprotein products, such as mince, are combined with egg white to bind it together. Fertiliser is also needed to grow sugar the fungi feeds on, which accounts for 11% of the emissions.

Some companies are now exploring whether mycoprotein fungi could grow on agricultural food waste rather than sugar, which could halve the amount of carbon emitted by the process.

Cocoa and raw cacao products have a dark side when it comes to the environment

Quorn, one of the leading mycoprotein manufacturers, recently released a detailed breakdown of the different emissions from its products. To make the mycoprotein itself produces just 0.8kg of CO2/kg. But to produce its vegan chicken-free slices, for example, releases 3.1kg of CO2/kg, mainly due to the energy needed to process the products.

The company says it hopes that by publishing the information it can help its customers make informed decisions about what impact the food they eat is having on the environment, and has called on other brands to follow its example.

Cocoa

It may have developed something of a reputation as a health food in recent years, but cocoa and raw cacao products have a dark side when it comes to the environment.

“Cocoa is also a major driver of tropical deforestation and one of the biggest contributors to global biodiversity loss after beef, pork, and poultry meat,” says Poore. Exact figures for how much forest is being lost due to cocoa production are hard to pin down, but it is estimated that 2-3 million hectares (4.9-7.4 million acres) of tropical forests were lost to cocoa plantations between 1988 and 2008.

Others have found that 2.1 million hectares of forest were cleared to make way for cacao trees in West Africa alone between 1998 and 2007. As demand has gone up, so has the amount of land being cleared for use by cocoa

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The housing project where young and old must mingle

 a Swedish housing experiment that forces solo-living renters to spend two hours a week together be a solution to loneliness for young people?

By Maddy Savage15th February 2020

T

There’s a beaming smile on 20-year-old Fia Stegroth’s face when she bumps into her new friend Rasmus Juhlin, a 22-year old who shares her passion for gaming, costume play and anime, in the foyer of their apartment building.

“We have a lot of hobbies that are the same and after 10 minutes we became friends,” she says, recalling their first encounter at a tenants’ meeting a few weeks earlier. “Clicked instantly,” confirms Rasmus, finishing off her sentence. “It was really fun to meet each other.”

The pair are among 72 people selected to take part in an experiment in collective living in Helsingborg, a small seaside city in southern Sweden. Known as Sällbo (which combines the Swedish words for companionship ‘sällskap’ and living ‘bo’), the project asks all residents to sign a contract promising to spend at least two hours a week with one another. Just under half the tenants are young people under the age of 25, and the rest are pensioners. Most live alone, although a few have relocated as couples or brought their pets along.

“We try to work against loneliness, to make people be more socially included,” explains Dragana Curovic, one of the managers of the scheme, which launched in November 2019 and is run by a housing company funded by the city council.

Sällbo, the name of the housing experiment, combines the Swedish words for companionship ‘sällskap’ and living ‘bo’ (Credit: Benoit Derrier)

Curovic hopes it will improve society, “because as they are happier, they will be less sick, they will go [to the doctor] less… and they will use less public services than they do now because they can ask their neighbours for help.”

‘Togetherness’

The residents have all been hand-picked by Curovic to ensure they have a range of different personalities, backgrounds, religions, interests and values. The rent is between 4,620 and 5,850 Swedish krona ($478 to $602) a month, around the same price as similarly-sized rent-controlled apartments elsewhere in the city.

But at Sällbo, as well as having their own individual flats (including separate kitchens and bathrooms), tenants also have access to multiple so-called “togetherness” areas designed to promote their interactions with others. There’s a gym, a yoga room and several communal kitchens. An arts-and-crafts studio has already been filled with residents’ mood boards, paints and wool, while residents have also begun stocking the library with books.

‘We try to work against loneliness, to make people be more socially included’ − Dragana Curovic

The largest “togetherness” lounge has quickly become a go-to spot for weekly card games thanks to its long tables. After her catch-up with Juhlin, Fia Stegroth is on her way there, to give a hug to her closest female friend in the complex, Gunnel Ericsson, who is 86.

“It’s a nice idea to get together instead of each sitting in one little flat,” says the widow. “I was so lonely after my husband died one and a half years ago… silence was overwhelming and it could go past days when I didn’t talk to anyone.”

Dragana Curovic says improving the quality of life of senior residents like Ericsson, who lacked daily interactions, was the project’s original goal. But once the team started their research, they realised how much many of the younger tenants could benefit too.

Tenants at Sällbo have access to multiple “togetherness” areas designed to promote their interactions with others (Credit: Benoit Derrier)

‘It’s been a myth for a long time that old people are more lonely than others. But it seems now that young people have a larger risk of being affected by loneliness’ − Johanna Nordin

“I was kind of lonely when I was living alone,” admits Stegroth. “I went to work, I went home, and I played on my computer, and went to bed… Here I am kind of forced to go around and meet people,” she explains.

Solo living

In Sweden, loneliness as a potential social and health problem for young people is increasingly generating discussion. Just as in the UK and the US, this age group has now overtaken the elderly as the most at risk of being lonely. A 2019 survey by community development consultancy WSP found that almost eight out of 10 Swedes aged 18 to 34 said they often or sometimes experienced loneliness, compared to a nationwide average of around six in 10.

Sweden’s largest daily newspaper Dagens Nyheter recently questioned whether loneliness among young people could be labeled “a new epidemic”, while scientists have found that being lonely can be as bad for your health as smoking 15 cigarettes today or being severely overweight.

“It’s been a myth for a long time that old people are more lonely than others. But it seems now that young people have a larger risk of being affected by loneliness,” confirms Johanna Nordin, a programme manager for the UK-based mental health charity Mind.

She explains that while loneliness is a global problem and can affect people regardless of their living situation, in Sweden a culture of individualism that encourages people to leave home and live alone at a much younger age can also play a role.

“It’s [seen as] a good thing to be independent very early, that you can take care of yourself, that you can do anything like a grown up,” she explains. “But we have lots of young people calling us… And they talk about how life is really hard when they start living alone: No one understands them. There are no people around them that they can talk to.”

Dragana Curovic says that feelings of loneliness can be even more acute for young immigrants. Sweden took in record numbers of asylum seekers at the height of Europe’s refugee crisis in 2015, but the country has frequently been ranked one of the worst places for foreigners to make friends.

Sweden is one of the most difficult countries for foreigners to make friends in, according to global expatriates community Internations (Credit: Benoit Derrier)

“Swedes are not so very open initially, they are a little bit more shy,” explains Curovic. “You have to have a social network around you… and it’s difficult to achieve that in the beginning.”

To help improve integration prospects in Helsingborg, 10 of the apartments at Sällbo are reserved for young newcomers, including 20-year-old Habibullah Ali, who is from Afghanistan and says he struggled to connect with Swedes before moving in.

“I’m so happy here. We all know each other. We meet each other,” he says as he joins Gunnel Ericsson and some of the other residents for a coffee evening after their card game wraps up. “It’s helped me to make friends and I don’t feel lonely.”

The Sällbo project is also hoping to mitigate some of the more negative effects of the global trend for digitalisation, such as spending increasing amounts of time online, gaming or on social media. A review of Nordic research released by Mind in January concluded that while additional studies are needed, there is a growing body of evidence which shows that young people who are more active in the digital world are more likely to report lower levels of wellbeing.

“It’s an effect of the digital era that we don’t have to meet people as much as we did before,’’ explains Johanna Nordin. “It’s so easy to stay at home with your computer or phone.”

At Sällbo, wi-fi is free in all the communal areas, but tenants are asked to pay for it if they want to log on in their rooms. “When we say ‘socialise’, it’s enough sometimes just to sit beside somebody and feel someone near you – you can’t do that through the computer or the telephone,” emphasises Curovic.

Prospects for success?

Since opening in November, there is no doubt the Sällbo project has already had a significant impact. Residents are quick to share their stories of playing cards, working out or running errands for one another, while many of them appear visibly “happier and more physically active” according to Curovic.

The Sällbo project hopes to mitigate some of the negative effects of digitalisation, such as excessive time gaming or checking social media (Credit: Benoit Derrier)

“There have been a few small conflicts – like in the washing [laundry] room, someone took another [person’s] time,” admits tenant Fia Stegroth, “but everyone is making friends – it just takes time.”

When it comes to the rule of socialising for at least two hours a week, this cannot be legally enforced, so nobody is going to be evicted for spending too long by themselves. But so far, all of the residents seem to be meeting the minimum requirements and have even set up their own Facebook group to improve communication.

‘By being together – different categories of people – it decreases segregation and also gives a better quality of life’ – Gunnar Andersson

“They started to socialise by themselves, we didn’t have to do anything,” grins Curovic. “It was exactly what we wanted. We couldn’t have hoped for it to go as well as it did.”

The scheme is set to be re-evaluated by the municipality in two years, but its success so far has led to attention from other towns and cities around Sweden, as well as housing companies in other countries.

“I think the project has some promise because it is directed to two specific groups of ‘lonely living’ people – young people and the elderly – who are in a temporary phase where you still might look out for connecting with other people,” says Gunnar Andersson, a professor of demography at Stockholm University who studies living trends in Sweden. “By being together – different categories of people – it decreases segregation and also gives a better quality of life.”

However, he is more sceptical about whether Sällbo-like projects aimed at the general population could work on a larger scale in Sweden, which has Europe’s highest proportion of single-occupancy households. “It is such a different prospect from long histories of living arrangements in Swedish culture… and it goes against the drive of individualism.”

The current recruitment process to Sällbo also has limitations, because it requires prospective tenants to take the initiative to apply and interview for spots, an approach that might put off some of the most lonely people in society, even if they could benefit from participating in the long run.

While not required under the experiment, residents have set up their own Facebook group to improve communication between them (Credit: Benoit Derrier)

“When you are suffering from, say, depression, it might be hard to live together with other people. It may take too much of your time or a capacity to even get up in the morning,” says Johanna Nordin at Mind. “I think it would be too much of a struggle for them.”

But tenants like Fia Stegroth are hopeful that growing numbers of vulnerable people will get the confidence to apply to Sällbo or similar co-living projects in future, as word of their impact continues to spread.

“It takes two minutes to send in [the application] to the people that can make you so much better. So take that one step,” she urges.

“I really like the concept to sneak out and see all the other activities round here in all the different rooms and meet people like that,” agrees her friend Rasmus Juhlin. “It’s just so nice to do things with your neighbours.”

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Romantic feelings rely on a complicated concoction of chemicals and psychology. But as part of our series on Life’s Big Questions with The Conversation, we ask, can they wear off?

elings rely on a complicated concoction of chemicals and psychology. But as part of our series on Life’s Big Questions with The Conversation, we ask, can they wear off?

By Parashkev Nachev14th February 2020

I have recently fallen head over heels in love, but my cynical friends keep telling me that love is nothing but a cocktail of pheromones, dopamine and oxytocin, and that these wear off after a couple of years. The thought scares me, it makes the whole thing seem meaningless. Is love really just brain chemistry? – Jo, London.

“Licence my roving hands, and let them go,

“Before, behind, between, above, below.”

It is no accident that arguably the most erotic line of English poetry is all prepositions. The essence of love, at least of passionately romantic love, is revealed in its very grammar. We “fall” in love, not “wander” into it. And, as you say, we fall “head over heels”, not dragging our feet – often at “first sight” rather than on careful inspection. We fall in love “madly, blind” to the other’s vices, not in rational appraisal of their virtues.

Romantic love is overwhelming, irresistible, ballistic. It is in control of us more than we are ever in control of it. In one sense a mystery, it is in another pure simplicity – its course, once engaged, predictable and inevitable, and its cultural expression more or less uniform across time and space. The impulse to think of it in terms of simple causes precedes science. Consider the arrow of Cupid, the potion of a sorcerer – love seems elemental.

Yet love is not easily conquered by science. Let us look at why. Sex pheromones, chemicals designed to broadcast reproductive availability to others, are often quoted as key instruments of attraction. It is an appealing idea. But while pheromones play an important role in insect communication, there is very little evidence that they even exist in humans.

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But if a chemical can signal attraction outside the body, why not inside it? The neuropeptide oxytocin, often inaccurately described as a “bonding hormone” and known for its role in lactation and uterine contraction, is the leading candidate here. This has been extensively studied, mainly in the prairie vole whose monogamy and public displays of affection make it an ideal model animal.

Can love really stay with us throughout our lives? (Credit: Getty Images)

Can love really stay with us throughout our lives? (Credit: Getty Images)

Blocking oxytocin disrupts the pair bonding that is here a surrogate for love, and makes the voles more restrained in their emotional expressions. Conversely, inducing an excess of oxytocin in other, non-monogamous vole species blunts their taste for sexual adventure. In humans, though, the effects are much less dramatic – a subtle change in the romantic preference for the familiar over the new. So oxytocin is far from proven to be essential to love.

Of course, even if we could identify such a substance, any message – chemical or otherwise – needs a recipient. So where is the letterbox of love in the brain? And how is the identity of the “chosen one” conveyed, given that no single molecule could possibly encode it?

When romantic love is examined with imaging of the brain, the areas that “light up” overlap with those supporting reward-seeking and goal-oriented behaviour. But that parts of our brains are set ablaze by one thing does not tell us much if they are just as excited by a very different, other thing. And the observed patterns of romantic love are not that different from those of maternal bonding, or even from the love of one’s favourite football team. So we can only conclude that neuroscience is yet to explain this “head over heels” emotion in neural terms.

Do we simply need more experiments? Yes, is usually the scientist’s answer, but this assumes love is simple enough to be captured by a mechanistic description. Each reproductive decision can be neither simple nor uniform, for we cannot be allowed to be guided by any single characteristic, let alone the same one. Universally attractive though tallness might be, if biology allowed us to select on height alone we would all have gigantism by now. And if the decisions have to be complex, so must the neural apparatus that makes them possible.

While this explains why romantic attraction must be complex, it doesn’t explain why it can feel so instinctual and spontaneous – unlike the deliberative mode we reserve for our most important decisions. Wouldn’t a cool, detached rationality be better? To see why it would not, consider what explicit reasoning is there in the first place. Evolving later than our instincts, we need rationality only to detach ourselves from the grounds for a decision so that others can record, understand and apply it independently of us.

But there is no need for anyone else to understand the grounds for our love, indeed the last thing we want to do is provide others with a recipe to steal our object of desire. Equally, in ceding control to recorded cultural practice, evolution would place too much “trust” in a capacity – collective rationality – that is, in evolutionary terms, far too young.

It is also a mistake to think of instinct as simple, and inferior to careful deliberation. That it is tacit makes it potentially more sophisticated than rational analysis, for it brings into play a wider array of factors than we could ever hold simultaneously in our conscious minds. The truth of this stares us in the face: think how much better we are at recognising a face compared with describing it. Why should the recognition of love be any different?

Ultimately, if the neural mechanisms of love were simple, you should be able to induce it with an injection, to extinguish it with a scalpel while leaving everything else intact. The cold, hard logic of evolutionary biology makes this impossible. Were love not complicated, we would never have evolved in the first place.

That said, love – like all our thoughts, emotions and behaviours – rests on physical processes in the brain, a very complex interplay of them. But to say that love is “just” brain chemistry is like saying Romeo and Juliet is “just” words – it misses the point. Like art, love is more than the sum of its parts.

So those of us lucky to experience its chaos should let ourselves be carried by the waves. And if we end up wrecked on the surf-hidden rocks, we can draw comfort from knowing reason would have got us no further.

This article is part of Life’s Big Questions, a new series by The Conversation that is being co-published with BBC Future. It seeks to answer our readers’ nagging questions about life, love, death and the Universe. We work with professional researchers who have dedicated their lives to uncovering new perspectives on the questions that shape our lives. If you have a question you would like to be answered, please email either send us a message on Facebook or Twitter or email bigquestions@theconversation.com

Parashkev Nachev is a professor of neurology University College London.

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Australia weather: How much rain did it take to put out NSW fires?

Since July there have been fires – sometimes hundreds at once – burning across New South Wales, Australia’s most populous state.

Firefighters have battled mammoth blazes daily during the state’s longest bushfire season. More than five million hectares have burned, in conditions worsened by years-long drought and record heat. Dozens of people have died across the country.

Things finally changed though when rain arrived in NSW last weekend.

A massive dump of water – more than 400mm (15.7in) in some places – caused flooding and transport chaos, but also helped finish off many of the fires.

AS graph showing the fires in Australia

On Thursday, authorities announced with delight that every single fire in the state had been contained. This means the perimeters of the fires have been “boxed in” and while some areas are still alight, the blaze is under control and won’t travel freely.

The majority of fire grounds up and down the coastline received the heavy drenching that was much needed – with many getting over 300mm in just one weekend.

Take for example the town of Nowra, in the state’s south, which was the scene of ferocious blazes back in January.

Rainfall (mm) across Nowra

NSW south coastSource: Bureau of Meteorology

The rain has been described by some as a miracle – particularly given the long-term forecast for the summer had predicted an 80% chance of below-average falls.

Three years of severe drought across the state had left forests tinder dry, making it too easy for fires to race into new areas.

While there had been some rain before last weekend, those isolated showers couldn’t effectively dampen the ground and reduce the risk of fires re-igniting.

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“Even when we did have some significant falls of 30 or 50mm, it wasn’t enough,” Simon Heemstra from the Rural Fire Service (RFS) told the BBC.

“Generally if you get even 20mm, you’d be happy about it slowing down and putting out a lot of the fire.

“But because it was so dry you could be getting 50mm and that rain would just be absorbed very quickly. And within a couple of days that vegetation had dried out again and started burning again.”

A graph showing the rainfall in Austrlaia
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Coronavirus: School cancels half term to protect Chinese pupils

a private school in Denbighshire have cancelled their holiday plans to protect their Chinese pupils from coronavirus.

Myddleton College in Denbigh will not close over half term or Easter as planned, so 40 pupils do not have to return to China and risk being exposed.

More than 1,300 people are now known to have died from the virus.

Head teacher Andrew Allman was due to fly to New York to celebrate his birthday.

“I and a number of staff have cancelled holidays so that we can be here for them and be available to reach out and support them at this difficult time, which naturally includes those who have important exams coming up in the summer,” he said.

“The reaction of the parents has been twofold because naturally parents of British-based children were concerned about students returning from China after the holidays.

“They have been reassured and so have the parents of children from China who will now remain here and in the case of those taking exams not face disruption to their future plans.”

Mr Allman said activities and trips had been scheduled for the pupils.

Pupil Martin Wong, 17, said: “We have been worried about the situation in China but now my parents’ minds are at ease knowing I’m safe and being supported by the school and not at risk of contracting the virus.”

Anna Zhang, 18, said: “We know our parents have been worried about the situation in China and how it would affect us if we had to go back and we are extremely thankful that we are able to stay on here with our friends.”

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Coronavirus: Are African countries ready?

has confirmed its first case of the new coronavirus – heralding its entry into Africa, a continent with increasingly close ties to China where the virus originated.

The World Health Organization (WHO) has already declared the coronavirus outbreak a global health emergency – largely because of fears that poorer countries may not be able to cope with an outbreak.

“The main reason for this declaration is not what is happening in China but what is happening in other countries. Our greatest concern is the potential for the virus to spread to countries with weaker health systems,” said WHO chief Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, who is from Ethiopia.

The health systems in many African countries are already struggling with the existing workload, so can they deal with another outbreak of a highly infectious disease?

Michael Yao, WHO’s head of emergency operations in Africa, notes that some countries on the continent “have the minimum to start with – they’re not starting from scratch”.

“We know how fragile the health system is on the African continent and these systems are already overwhelmed by many ongoing disease outbreaks, so for us it is critical to detect earlier so that we can prevent the spread.”

What facilities are there at the moment to treat it?

Until early this week, there were only two laboratories in Africa – one in Senegal and the other in South Africa – which had the reagents needed to test samples. They have been working as referral laboratories for countries around the region.

One of the laboratories, Institut Pasteur de Dakar, in Senegal has long been on the front line in medical innovation in Africa, including in yellow fever research.

However this week Ghana, Madagascar, Nigeria and Sierra Leone have announced they can also conduct tests.

A member of staff works in a laboratory
Image captionThe Institut Pasteur de Dakar, in Senegal, is one of the laboratories that has the reagents needed to test samples

The WHO is also sending kits to 29 laboratories on the continent to ensure they have the capacity to deal with the virus and also help test samples from other countries if needed.

However it’s hoped that by later this month at least 36 African countries will be equipped to carry out tests specific to the coronavirus.

The ability of African nations to properly diagnose cases “depends on the new reagents being made available from China and Europe,” says Dr Yao.

The Nigerian Red Cross Society says it has placed one million volunteers on alert. Its Secretary General Abubakar Ahmed Kende said the measure was to prevent the possible spread of the virus into the country and also contain the spiralling outbreak of Lassa fever across the country.

In Tanzania, Health Minister Ummy Mwalimu announced that isolation centres in the north, east and west of the country had been identified. Thermometers have been stockpiled and more than 2,000 health workers have been trained.

Several countries including Kenya, Ethiopia, Ivory Coast, Ghana and Botswana have dealt with suspected cases, placing them in quarantine while tests were carried out. So far, all have tested negative for the virus.

Uganda’s health ministry confirmed it had quarantined more than 100 people who have arrived at Entebbe International Airport. Some of the people have been quarantined at two hospitals in Entebbe and Kampala, while others have been asked to stay in their homes.

Have any lessons been learned from Ebola?

Dr Yao was involved in dealing with the outbreaks of Ebola in West Africa in 2014-2016 and more recently in the east of the Democratic Republic of Congo. He said he was concerned that there was not enough capacity to treat critical cases of coronavirus.

“We’re advising countries to at least detect cases early to avoid spreading the new virus within the community – that will be difficult to manage,” he says.

On a positive note, many African countries were already screening passengers arriving at their ports of entry for Ebola. Countries that dealt with the Ebola outbreak still have the isolation facilities and expertise in controlling infectious diseases.

But when it comes to detection, Ebola is different to the coronavirus. Ebola only became infectious when symptoms showed however there have been reports that

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Global fashion industry facing a ‘nightmare’

ry goods makers are anticipating significant losses due to the coronavirus outbreak, while High Street retailers could see new collections delayed by months.

The global fashion industry is worth £2tn ($1.5tn) and it brings the UK more than £30bn a year in revenues.

According to investment bank Jefferies, Chinese consumers make up 80% of growth in the market.

“It’s a nightmare,” said Flavio Cereda, a managing director at Jeffries.

The power of the Chinese consumer has grown over the last decade and now accounts for 38% of the global fashion industry. In comparison, in 2003, during the Sars epidemic, the Chinese consumer accounted for only about 8% of the market.

And until 23 January, sales forecasts for 2020 were looking good.

But with some Chinese cities now on full or partial lockdown and a spike in new cases – as of Friday, 63,922 confirmed cases of coronavirus and 1,381 deaths – shopping malls are deserted, workers are at home, and the luxury goods industry is seriously worried.

There have been profit warnings from Burberry, Ralph Lauren, Coach and Kate Spade owner Tapestry, Moncler and Capri Holdings – the parent firm of brands like Versace, Michael Kors and Jimmy Choo.

“We’ve never seen a situation like this, where sales go to zero. And it affects everybody, whether you’re a big or small brand,” Mr Cereda told the BBC.

“We’re looking at at least four months of very painful trading figures.”

Mr Cereda thinks that there will definitely be a recovery, as there is a lot of “pent up demand” to spend from Chinese consumers, and that spend is crucial to continued growth in the global fashion industry. But his guess is that it could take until the summer for consumer confidence to pick up again.

People queue up outside the Louis Vuitton store at a mall in Shenzhen, China
Image captionChinese consumers now make up 38% of the global fashion market

“Chinese shoppers have a lot of money to spend nowadays,” Maria Marlone, a principal lecturer at Manchester Metropolitan University’s Fashion Institute told BBC Radio 5 Live’s Wake Up to Money programme.

“So whether they come over to the UK to shop and spend here, or they go up there into their own cities and shop for UK brands over there, it’s going to cause a problem, because there’s just no product and there’s nobody there to retail the product.”

“Not only have you got the problem of getting product out of China… you’ve also got the closure of UK companies’ hub offices that are based in China, and they’re quite big operations.”

At London Fashion Week 2020 over the last few days, Chinese buyers have been missing and they most likely won’t be at Milan Fashion Week on 18 February, added Mr Cereda.

Manufacturing impact on retailers

High Street retailers will not be spared the impact of the coronovirus outbreak either. Some retailers have stores overseas in mainland China and southeast Asia, but even without an Asian presence, a lot of manufacturing is still carried out in China.

UK retailers are now facing delays to their spring fashion collections of at least four to six weeks, at a conservative estimate, according to retail expert Kate Hardcastle.

Ms Marlone agrees: “If products haven’t been on the seas a few weeks ago, there is going to be a delay – they reckon maybe up to two or three months, and if there’s going to be that much, then you have to question whether the customers are going to want it at that stage.”

“High quality goods like Burberry and John Smedley are still manufactured in the UK, but mid-range quality like M&S have been chucked out to China a few years ago.”

People walk past Marks & Spencer in Hong Kong
Image captionA lot of manufacturing for some retailers is now carried out in China

London-based clothing and fabric manufacturer ApparelTasker says that the closure of Chinese factories and wider uncertainty is benefiting its business.

The firm says that it charges double the amount it would cost to have items manufactured in China.

“Today alone I’ve had five or six orders placed with me, based on the uncertainty of China’s delivery windows, on the back of the coronavirus. All of it is by London Fashion Week designers,” ApparelTasker’s founder Zack Sartor told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme.

Ms Hardcastle is worried about the impact delays in product deliveries will have on High Street that is already reeling from a dismal Christmas.

“Spring and summer collections create a spike of interest online and in stores – usually more colourful than the autumn and winter colours before them – they help drive important online dwell time and in-store visits,” she said.

Consumers want to buy into trends as soon as they see them, and want products in shops to always look “fresh and new”, which will be a struggle if the delivery delays continue.

“Retailers don’t have much capacity for further issues – there are still 70-80%

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Will Vodafone hang up its business in India?

dia’s Supreme Court has refused to grant telecoms companies further time to pay billions of dollars in additional revenues to the government. The BBC’s business reporter Arunoday Mukharji explains why this is a body blow to the entire industry.

India is one of the world’s largest telecoms markets, but its main players have been facing a torrid time in recent years.

And now their woes have been added to, after the country’s top court directed telecoms companies to pay $13bn (£9.9bn) by 17 March – further asking why contempt proceedings should not be initiated against them for not coughing up the money earlier.

For Vodafone-Idea – one of the country’s biggest telecoms firms – the order comes during an especially difficult period. The company announced a sixth straight quarterly loss of $903m (£693m) this week, compared to a loss of $70m during the same period last year.

The situation is so bad, the company’s chairman Kumar Mangalam Birla has gone on record to say the company will shut shop if they are not granted any relief from the government or courts.

Vodafone-Idea, along with competitor Airtel, had been seeking more time to pay their dues at a juncture when they are already burdened with dipping tariffs and mounting debt.

The question now is with a payment deadline of 17 March and no intervention from the government looking forthcoming, is this the end of the road for the company’s India operation?

The UK-based telecoms company has been one of the oldest and largest players in the Indian market, and the impact of a shutdown is not insignificant. After all, it has more than 300m subscribers, and provides jobs for hundreds of thousands.

But its closure would likely have an adverse impact on the telecoms sector as a whole.

A Muslim bride takes a selfie with her mobile phone as she participates in an 'All Religion Mass Wedding' ceremony at Sabarmati Riverfront in Ahmedabad on February 8, 2020
Image captionIndia is one of the largest telecoms markets in the world

If Vodafone Idea does decide to exit the Indian market, the industry will effectively be turned into a duopoly, with the only players being India’s Reliance Jio Infocomm and Bharti Airtel.

And Airtel is not in a very good place either, posting losses of nearly $3bn at the end of the last quarter and owing the government nearly $5bn in dues.

Jio, the newest entrant to the country’s telecoms sector, is in a much happier place and is acknowledged to be responsible for completely changing the nature of the telecoms sector.

When it entered the market three years ago, the company slashed data prices and, in the process, managed to change what was essentially a voice market into a data market. This resulted in India ending up with the cheapest mobile data in the world and severely disrupting the business models of both Vodafone Idea and Airtel.

Since then, both companies have shed millions of subscribers. They have joint losses of more than $10bn and they are now haunted by the prospects of a massive pay-out in dues to the government within the next month.

This photo taken on March 7, 2017 shows Indian students watching a movie on their smartphone while commuting on a suburban train in Mumbai. Buyouts, mergers and quick exits -- as India's richest man shakes up the country's ultra-competitive mobile market, telecommunications companies are scrambling to either consolidate or cut their losses and run.
Image captionVodafone Idea has more than 300 million subscribers in India

With more than 350m subscribers as of 2019, Jio looks most likely to benefit from a Vodafone exit. Experts have estimated that it could well double its earnings by 2022, potentially signing up more than 500m subscribers by then.

But what will this mean for India’s price-sensitive consumers?

Possibly, not very good news.

Massive losses from both Vodafone and Airtel last quarter prompted all three firms to raise prices.

“Prices going up is not necessarily a bad thing – it would in fact be a good thing, because that is the only way to have some competition in this market,” economist Vivek Kaul told the BBC earlier.

“This needs to happen for telecoms to survive and thrive in India.”

But, whether that would result in a slowdown of India’s massive telecoms growth rate, remains to be seen.

What exactly are telecoms companies and the government battling over?

The battle over Adjusted Gross Revenue (AGR), has been a long and drawn out one.

In layman’s terms this means that a certain proportion of revenues earned by telecoms companies needs to be shared with the government’s department of telecoms.

Telecoms companies and the government had disagreed on the definition of adjusted gross revenue since 2005. The companies only wanted revenue from telecoms to be calculated in this figure, but the government wanted a much wider definition, including non-telecoms revenue like sale of assets and interest earned on deposits.

But recently, the Supreme Court ruled in favour of the government, which meant that telecoms companies needed to pay authorities a further $12.5bn.

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Coronavirus: Beijing orders 14-day quarantine for returnees

dered everyone returning to the city to go into quarantine for 14 days or risk punishment in the latest attempt to contain the deadly new coronavirus, state media report.

Residents were told to “self-quarantine or go to designated venues to quarantine” after returning to the Chinese capital from holidays.

The measure came as Egypt confirmed the first coronavirus case in Africa.

Over 1,500 people have died from the virus, which originated in Wuhan city.

The notice on Friday from Beijing’s virus prevention working group was issued as residents returned from spending the Lunar New Year in other parts of China.

The holiday was extended this year to help contain the outbreak.

More than 20 million people live in Beijing.

China’s national health commission on Saturday reported 143 new deaths, bringing the toll to 1,523. All but four of the latest victims were in hard-hit Hubei province.

A further 2,641 people have been newly confirmed as infected, bringing the national total to 66,492.

Outside mainland China, there have been more than 500 cases in 24 countries, and three deaths: one each in Hong Kong, the Philippines and Japan.

A World Health Organization (WHO)-led mission to China will start its outbreak investigation work this weekend, focusing on how the virus – officially named Covid-19 – is spreading and its severity, director Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said.

The mission, including international experts, will also look at how and when more than 1,700 health workers contracted the virus.

The team consists of 12 international members and their 12 Chinese counterparts.

“Particular attention will be paid to understanding transmission of the virus, the severity of disease and the impact of ongoing response measures,” said Dr Mike Ryan, executive director of the WHO health emergencies programme.

Africa sees its first case

Egypt’s health ministry on Friday confirmed the first case of the coronavirus in Africa.

The ministry described the person as a foreigner, but did not disclose the nationality.

It said it had notified the WHO, and the patient had been placed in isolation in a hospital.

Experts had earlier warned that it may not be long before the first case was confirmed in Africa, given its increasingly close ties to China.

Chinese health workers die in the outbreak

Chinese officials say six health workers have died.

Zeng Yixin, vice minister of China’s National Health Commission, said 1,102 medical workers had been infected in Wuhan and another 400 in other parts of Hubei province.

“The duties of medical workers at the front are indeed extremely heavy; their working and resting circumstances are limited, the psychological pressures are great, and the risk of infection is high,” Mr Zeng said, as quoted by Reuters news agency.

Media captionMedics in Wuhan resort to shaving their heads in a bid to prevent cross-infection of the coronavirus

Local authorities have struggled to provide protective equipment such as respiratory masks, goggles and protective suits in hospitals in the area.

On 7 February, the plight of medical workers was highlighted by the death of Li Wenliang, a doctor at Wuhan Central Hospital who had tried to issue the first warning about the virus on 30 December.

He had sent out a warning to fellow medics but police told him to stop “making false comments”.

A wave of anger and grief flooded Chinese social media site Weibo when news of Dr Li’s death broke.

What are the other developments?

  • In the UK, health officials contacted hundreds of people who attended a conference in London, after it emerged that one of them was diagnosed with coronavirus
  • China said it would stagger the return of children to school – several provinces have closed schools until the end of February
  • In Vietnam, which borders China, thousands of people in villages near the capital, Hanoi, have been put under quarantine after several cases were discovered. Vietnam has now confirmed at least 16 cases
  • The Red Cross has called for sanctions relief for North Korea, which would allow the aid agency to transfer funds to buy equipment. Testing kits and protective clothing are urgently needed to prepare for a possible outbreak, it says

Read more about the coronavirus and its impact


Are you in Hubei? Or do you have information to share? Get in touch by emailing haveyoursay@bbc.co.uk.

Please include a contact number if you are willing to speak to a BBC journalist. You can also contact us in the following ways:

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Crackdown on militants as US and Afghan Taliban seek deal

Afghanistan have been assassinated, whilst another Pakistani militant group has been targeted in a deadly raid by Afghan special forces.

The apparent crackdown comes as negotiations between US and Afghan Taliban officials, aimed at bringing an end to the 18-year-long conflict, appear to be leading towards an agreement.

One militant source told the BBC he believed the deaths were the result of a secret pact between American and Pakistani forces. Pakistan is believed to have played an important role in facilitating the discussions.

In the latest incident, Shehryar Mehsud, leader of a breakaway faction of the Pakistani Taliban, was killed in the eastern province of Kunar when a remote control bomb exploded close to his home.

He had numerous rivals within militant circles, but they have denied involvement in his death, whilst members of his group told the BBC they believed Pakistani intelligence services were responsible.

The Pakistani Taliban and Afghan Taliban are separate organisations – focussed on carrying out attacks only within their own countries.

Various factions of the Pakistani Taliban established bases in eastern Afghanistan, following military operations against them in Pakistan.

It is alleged that the Afghan security services developed links to some of the groups – to counteract Pakistani support for the Afghan Taliban, which has been waging a long-running insurgency aimed at forcing out the Afghan government, backed by US-led forces.

Both countries officially deny supporting militant groups.

Sheikh Khalid Haqqani
Image captionSheikh Khalid Haqqani and another senior Pakistani Taliban member were killed in Kabul

Earlier this month, two senior Pakistani Taliban commanders were killed in mysterious circumstances in the Afghan capital Kabul.

Meanwhile, on Monday reports emerged of a raid on the Hizbul Ahrar Pakistani militant group by Afghan forces in the eastern province of Nangarhar.

Members of Hizbul Ahrar were shocked at the raid, saying they previously believed they would not be targeted by Afghan security forces, as they have not carried out attacks within Afghanistan.

‘Game rules’ seem to be changing

The confusion in Pakistani militant circles comes as a high-profile former Pakistani Taliban spokesman appears to have escaped from the custody of Pakistan’s intelligence services.

Ehsanullah Ehsan, who had claimed some of the groups most notorious attacks, including the shooting of schoolgirl Malala Yousafzai, surrendered in 2017. However, he was never presented in court, nor charged with an offence.

An audio message, purporting to be from Ehsanullah Ehsan was released last week, claiming that he had escaped, because Pakistani authorities had not been faithful to the terms of “a deal” he had made with them.

He later told reporters he had arrived in Turkey, but has so far refused to give further details, or video proof of where he is.

Many in Pakistan are sceptical that Ehsanullah Ehsan could have actually “escaped”, suggesting instead he was released as part of an opaque deal.

There has been no comment from the Pakistani military or government as to what happened.

However, journalists have reported being directed to broadcast claims, attributed to “sources”, that Ehsanullah Ehsan had provided “top level information” to the security services that led to successful operations against other militants.

Members of militant groups often refer to “games” being played by regional security forces. The rules of those “games” seem to be changing.

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A woman wears a protective mask at Jingshan Park in Beijing, China, 14 February 2020.

Beijing orders 14-day quarantine for all returnees

  • 15 February 2020
  • From the sectionChina

Full article Beijing orders 14-day quarantine for all returnees

A man sits outside the downed shutters of a shop painted with a logo of Vodafone on its shutter in Mumbai, India on 24 February 2019

Will Vodafone hang up its business in India?

  • 15 February 2020
  • From the sectionIndia

Full article Will Vodafone hang up its business in India?

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Coronavirus: Singapore minister says country is ‘vulnerable’

er says country is ‘vulnerable’

As the Covid-19 coronavirus continues to spread around the world, several cases including a Briton have been linked to a conference that was held in Singapore in January.

The BBC’s Karishma Vaswani speaks to Lawrence Wong, a cabinet minister and co-chair of Singapore’s coronavirus government taskforce, and asks if the country is a gateway to the spread of the virus

  • 13 Feb 2020

Go to next video: Coronavirus in the UK: Five things you need to know

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Coronavirus outbreak: Chinese medics shave heads

oronavirus outbreak: Chinese medics shave heads

Medics in Wuhan have been shaving their heads in a bid to prevent cross-infection of the coronavirus.

Tens of thousands of people in China have been diagnosed with Covid-19 and it has spread to several other countries.

  • 13 Feb 2020

Go to next video: Coronavirus in the UK: Five things you need to know

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Indonesia’s Jokowi: Reformer turns pragmatist

onesia’s Jokowi: Reformer turns pragmatist

Indonesian president Joko Widodo swept to power promising reform for Indonesia, but some say that under his watch the country has actually become less tolerant and free.

In an exclusive broadcast interview with the BBC, he tells Asia Business correspondent Karishma Vaswani why he is putting growth and jobs first, before Indonesia’s hard-won democratic and civil rights.

  • 14 Feb 2020

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Hafiz Saeed: Will Pakistan’s ‘terror cleric’ stay in jail?

An anti-terrorism court in Pakistan has sentenced hardline Islamist cleric Hafiz Mohammad Saeed to 11 years in jail for financing terrorist operations.

The man accused of masterminding the 2008 Mumbai terror attacks that killed 161 people is to serve two five-and-a-half prison terms concurrently.

Saeed has been wanted by India for years, and is designated as a global terrorist by both the UN and the US, which has a $10m bounty on his head. He’s the founder of one of Pakistan’s largest militant groups, Lashkar-e-Taiba (LeT).

So why has it taken so long to put him behind bars – and will he stay there? The answer is complicated, not least by the fact that Saeed is widely known to have close links with the Pakistani military.

Why punish him now?

The answer may lie in Pakistan’s growing international isolation since the mid-2000s, its worsening economic woes and more recently a threat of being blacklisted by the Financial Action Task Force (FATF), the international terror financing and money laundering watchdog.

Significantly, Saeed’s conviction comes a week before the Paris-based FATF discusses Pakistan’s progress in curbing terror financing.

Pakistan, which has long denied supporting militants to further its foreign policy goals, is already in financial dire straits.

Mostly ruled by its military, whether directly or indirectly, since its independence in 1947, the country has heavily depended on American and Middle Eastern aid to sustain itself as a viable state.

Experts believe that if Pakistan continues to fail to satisfy the FATF and is downgraded to its blacklist, there could be serious financial and diplomatic implications, including an impact on a bailout it’s getting from the International Monetary Fund (IMF).

India is watching events closely. The US State Department called the conviction of Saeed a “step forward”.

Twitter post by @State_SCA: Today’s conviction of Hafiz Saeed and his associate is an important step forward – both toward holding LeT accountable for its crimes, and for #Pakistan in meeting its international commitments to combat terrorist financing.

What has Pakistan been doing to curb militants?

In June 2018, FATF moved Pakistan to its “grey” list of countries – those that are found to be non-compliant on money laundering and terror financing standards.

This photograph taken on November 29, 2008 shows an Indian soldier aiming his weapon towards The Taj Mahal Hotel in Mumbai.
Image captionSaeed is accused of masterminding the 2008 Mumbai terror attacks

Over the subsequent months, in order to avoid international sanctions, Pakistan moved to arrest scores of terror suspects and sealed or took over hundreds of properties linked to banned groups.

But many saw these actions as just meant for optics, with no serious action visible against major militant groups such as Jamaat-ud-Dawa (JuD) and Jaish-e-Mohammad (JeM).

The pressure kept rising, and in April 2019, the government proscribed half a dozen organisations linked to the JuD and another group, the Markaz Dawa-wal-Irshad (MDwI).

Hafiz Saeed’s conviction was for owning properties linked to banned organisations such as JuD and MDwI.

He was arrested last July, three months before FATF’s scheduled review of whether Pakistan was complying with its action plan.

In that review, held in October, Pakistan was found lacking on several counts, but a decision on whether to downgrade it was put off until the next review, which is expected next week.

Saeed was indicted in December, and the trial concluded in less than two months, which must be a record of sorts for Pakistan.

But given his close links with the Pakistani security establishment, many question if he will be really abandoned by the Pakistani establishment, made to serve a full sentence and condemned to the life of a convicted criminal.

Is this the first time he has been arrested?

No.

Pakistan has arrested him several times since the 9/11 attacks in the US, but it never charged him with specific offences and always set him free in the end.

He was put under house arrest on a number of occasions, first when the Indian government blamed him for masterminding the December 2001 attack on its parliament, and then after the Mumbai train bombings of 2006.

Pakistan PM Imran Khan
Image captionPakistan is already in financial dire straits

He was also put under house arrest several times between 2008 and 2009 following accusations that the LeT had carried out the 2008 Mumbai attacks.

On each of these occasions, the Pakistani government did not frame charges against him. Instead, it continued to file for extensions of his house arrest which the courts would ultimately refuse, setting him free.

Whether this time will be different, or if it is enough to satisfy the FATF remains to be seen.

What is Saeed’s background?

He set up MDwI jointly with a Pakistan-based Saudi Salafist leader Abdullah Uzzam in 1987, when the Soviet occupation of Afghanistan was nearing its end.

The group spawned Lashkar-e-Taiba (LeT), allegedly with help from Pakistan’s Inter-Services Intelligence (ISI) spy agency, to move a major portion of Islamist jihadis from Afghanistan to fight against Indian rule in disputed Kashmir.

It is widely believed the LeT was instrumental in neutralising the secular, pro-independence rhetoric of the Kashmiri leadership which had shaped the region’s first popular uprising against Indian rule in 1988, and turned it into a pro-Pakistan Islamist campaign.

At the same time, analysts believe, it continued to provide tactical and ideological support to Islamist factions that prevented post-Soviet Afghanistan from stabilising.

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Australia weather: How much rain did it take to put out NSW fires?

Since July there have been fires – sometimes hundreds at once – burning across New South Wales, Australia’s most populous state.

Firefighters have battled mammoth blazes daily during the state’s longest bushfire season. More than five million hectares have burned, in conditions worsened by years-long drought and record heat. Dozens of people have died across the country.

Things finally changed though when rain arrived in NSW last weekend.

A massive dump of water – more than 400mm (15.7in) in some places – caused flooding and transport chaos, but also helped finish off many of the fires.

AS graph showing the fires in Australia

On Thursday, authorities announced with delight that every single fire in the state had been contained. This means the perimeters of the fires have been “boxed in” and while some areas are still alight, the blaze is under control and won’t travel freely.

The majority of fire grounds up and down the coastline received the heavy drenching that was much needed – with many getting over 300mm in just one weekend.

Take for example the town of Nowra, in the state’s south, which was the scene of ferocious blazes back in January.

Rainfall (mm) across Nowra

NSW south coastSource: Bureau of Meteorology

The rain has been described by some as a miracle – particularly given the long-term forecast for the summer had predicted an 80% chance of below-average falls.

Three years of severe drought across the state had left forests tinder dry, making it too easy for fires to race into new areas.

While there had been some rain before last weekend, those isolated showers couldn’t effectively dampen the ground and reduce the risk of fires re-igniting.

“Even when we did have some significant falls of 30 or 50mm, it wasn’t enough,” Simon Heemstra from the Rural Fire Service (RFS) told the BBC.

“Generally if you get even 20mm, you’d be happy about it slowing down and putting out a lot of the fire.

“But because it was so dry you could be getting 50mm and that rain would just be absorbed very quickly. And within a couple of days that vegetation had dried out again and started burning again.”

A graph showing the rainfall in Austrlaia

The RFS’s fleet of water-bombing aircraft, up against “megafires” the size of small countries, could only have limited impact on such a landscape. At least two of the fires had scorched more than 500,000 hectares by the time they went out.

But because the rain was heavy and came down steadily over the weekend, it could soak into parched vegetation and seep deep into the soil, rather than just running off.

Firefighters watched a bushfire in New South Wales

GettyNSW bushfires

  • 5.4 millionhectares of land burned
  • 2,439homes destroyed
  • 11,264bush or grass fires
  • 24mlitres of fire retardant used

Source: NSW RFS

“Because it was sustained over a long period of time, we’re seeing it broadly throughout the landscape,” said Mr Heemstra.

“You’d probably need hundreds, even thousands of drops from planes to achieve the equivalent of a good amount of 30-50mm rain.

“The quantity you would need to address those burning materials across those grounds is just enormous.”

A helicopter drops fire retardant in Balmoral, 150 kilometres southwest of Sydney
Image captionAir-cranes like these have a 7,560-litre tank

Furthermore, a water drop from a plane is just “one short, sharp drop” – meaning the ground can’t properly absorb it. Sometimes that water would also blow away because of winds around the fire.

While the rains caused intense flooding and whipped up surf that damaged areas along the shore, the downpour did help fill up reservoirs and dams desperately needing it.

Flood waters lap a bushfire warning road sign
Image captionThe heavy rains sparked flooding in many previously fire-affected areas

Sydney – the nation’s largest city – has been under water restrictions since late last year, when its dams fell below 45% capacity.

But the city could see an easing of some of these limits now the dam at Warragamba, which supplies 80% of its water, has filled up.

Warragamba Dam 10 Feb 2020

GettyWarragamba dam

Supplies 80% of Sydney’s water

  • 42.7%full on 7 February
  • 76.7%full on 14 February
  • 34.0%increase in one week

Source: WaterNSW

More heavy rains are expected this weekend, with forecasts saying many of the state’s rivers will burst their banks again, while inland areas may even receive hail.

Severe storms are also set to batter neighbouring states of Queensland and Victoria with cyclonic winds and more damaging surf. However, firefighters will be looking to the silver lining in this cloud.

Already, the NSWRFS command headquarters in Sydney has been turned into the chief station for storm relief operations. More firefighters were out last week working on rescues than at fire grounds.

“From now on, we’re hoping all this continued rain will just benefit everything we’ve already done,” said Mr Heemstra.

“Here’s hoping that we cross that finish line.”

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Coronavirus: Cancelling Tokyo 2020 Olympics ‘not being considered’

celling or postponing the Tokyo Olympics because of the coronavirus outbreak “has not been considered”, says 2020 Games chief Toshiro Muto.

The outbreak in China has already led to the cancellation of a number of sporting events, including April’s Chinese Grand Prix.

The Olympics are due to begin on 24 July in Japan’s capital city.

On Thursday, the coronavirus death toll in China rose above 1,350 – with almost 60,000 infections in total.

Several qualification events have been impacted by the virus.

Speaking at a news conference in Tokyo, Muto said: “I want to again state clearly that cancellation or postponement of the Tokyo Games has not been considered.”

Muto said earlier this month that organisers were “extremely worried in the sense that the spread of the infectious virus could pour cold water on momentum for the Games”.

International Olympic Committee member John Coates said he was looking forward to hearing from organisers on how they were working with the Japanese government and the World Health Organisation “to ensure that all of the athletes, and all of the people who come to Japan for the Games are not going to be affected, and that all the necessary precautions are being taken”.

The coronavirus outbreak has also led to the cancellation of the World Indoor Athletics Championships and two LPGA events.

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Coronavirus: ‘Pariah’ cruise ship rejected by five ports docks at last

at was stranded at sea, because ports were worried about passengers bringing coronavirus, has been allowed to dock in Cambodia.

The MS Westerdam had been turned away by five places in Asia in recent days.

Another cruise ship in quarantine in Japan has more than 200 infections – but the Westerdam, with more than 2,000 crew and passengers, has none.

Only on Tuesday, the cruise liner attempted to dock in Bangkok but was denied permission.

A Thai Navy ship escorted her out of the Gulf of Thailand, from where she set course for Cambodia.

On Thursday morning, the ship finally arrived at an anchoring point in the port city of Sihanoukville.

“This morning, just seeing land was such a breathtaking moment,” passenger Angela Jones from the US told Reuters. “I thought: is this real?”

According to the English-language Khmer Times, the ship will allow passengers to disembark on Friday, after 20 people on board who had fallen ill tested negative for coronavirus.Skip Twitter post by @ChristinaKerby

Christina Kerby@ChristinaKerby

🙏

The Minister of Health of Cambodia has confirmed that there is NO coronavirus aboard the #Westerdam. Passengers will begin to disembark in the morning. Thank you Cambodia! 29612:53 AM – Feb 14, 2020Twitter Ads info and privacy63 people are talking about thisReport

End of Twitter post by @ChristinaKerby

The Westerdam, run by the US-based Holland America Line, departed Hong Kong on 1 February with 1,455 passengers and 802 crew on board.

The cruise had been scheduled to run for two weeks – and with those 14 days running out, there were worries about fuel and food supplies.

As well as Thailand, it was also turned away by Taiwan, Guam, the Philippines, and Japan.

“We’ve had so many near moments – we thought we were going home only to be turned away,” Ms Jones said.

The ship’s captain Vincent Smit said the ship would anchor outside Sihanoukville to allow authorities to conduct health checks on board.

Cruise guests playing board games
Image captionPassengers have had to kill time and uncertainty

Passengers will then be able to leave the ship and return to their home countries from the country’s capital Phnom Penh.

The US embassy in Cambodia said it had sent a team to assist its citizens with planning their journey.

Cambodia’s decision to welcome the MS Westerdam was praised by the chief of the World Health Organization (WHO).

It was “an example of the international solidarity we have consistently been calling for”, Director-General Tedros Ghebreyesus said.

There have been regular health checks for all passengers on board the Westerdam, and there have been no cases so far.

The ship in Japan, quarantined in the port of Yokohama, currently has more than 200 confirmed cases – making the Diamond Princess the largest coronavirus cluster outside China.

Not all passengers have been tested, and the number of cases may continue to rise. Another 44 were added to the tally on Thursday.

Japanese Health Minister Katsunobu Kato said elderly passengers who test negative for the virus would be allowed to leave on Friday, five days before the scheduled end of the quarantine.

About 80% of the ship’s passengers are aged 60 or over. Japanese media reports that 215 passengers are in their 80s, and 11 are in their 90s.

Another cruise ship was quarantined for several days off Hong Kong, because a previous guest had been diagnosed with the virus.

All passengers have now been allowed off.

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Karachi groom chased from wedding after first wife turns up

A groom has been chased from his own wedding by an angry crowd – after his first wife arrived to let his new bride know he was already married to not one, but two other women.

Asif Rafiq Siddiqi, described as a bearded, hefty man in his mid-30s, was pushed and slapped by the crowd, his shirt torn and his pants ripped in the violence that followed the revelation.

The groom, who ended up cowering under a bus, was saved by unknown people.

Polygamy is legal in Pakistan.

However, while a man can have as many as four wives, he must get the consent of his previous wives before he marries again.

It appears that Mr Siddiqi failed to fulfill this critical step, and the first his new wife and her family knew of his previous marriages was when an enraged woman marched into the banqueting hall in the coastal city of Karachi, where celebrations were taking place.

“What’s the matter sister?” one of the bride’s relatives is heard asking on a video of the event.

The woman, Madiha Siddiqi, wasted no time in getting to the point.

“He is my husband, and he is the father of this child. He told me he was going to Hyderabad for three days,” she alleged. She was with a little boy she said was their son.

A woman grasps the man's hands surrounded by a crowd
Image captionThe wedding was interrupted by a woman claiming to be the first of his three wives

The family then tried to usher her into a side room, which gave her the opportunity to point out more of the people she claims are her relatives.

“That is my mother-in-law and that is my jethani [sister-in-law], who said her mother had been sick for three days and was on IV drips,” Mrs Siddqi continued, before confronting the newlywed bride directly.

“Didn’t you know that he was my husband? He didn’t even think about this innocent child.”

However, it did not stop there: Ms Siddiqi said she had married the groom in 2016, after meeting him at Karachi’s Federal Urdu University, where Mr Siddiqi is understood to work.

Then she revealed he had secretly married his second wife, named as Zehra Ashraf, a teacher at Jinnah Women’s University in Karachi, in 2018. The first Mrs Siddiqi knew of that marriage was a text message from her husband’s new wife.

Mrs Siddiqi said Mr Siddiqi initially denied that wife’s existence, but later admitted he had wed for a second time.

It was Ms Ashraf who also informed Mrs Siddiqi of the latest wedding, sending her in a rage to the celebrations.

It is not clear what exactly happened next. However, police called to the scene told BBC that relatives of the bride pounced on Asif, tore up his clothes and beat him black and blue.

Officers rescued Mr Siddiqi, taking him a a nearby police station – but the bride’s relatives followed and waited for him to emerge.

They pounced the moment Mr Siddiqi reappeared – sending him scuttling under a bus. In a video of the scene, voices can be heard threatening him to “come out or we’ll put the bus on fire”.

Scared, he shouts back, “one minute, one minute”, as he prepares to crawl out. As he moves, some people intervene to prevent further violence.

BBC tried to contact Mr Siddiqi and his latest bride’s relatives for comments, but they were not available.

Rao Nazim, head of Taimuriha police station, told the BBC no formal complaint had been registered as yet.

“It is a family matter, and the complainants need to go the family court to settle their issues,” he said.

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Srinivas Gowda: The Indian buffalo racer compared to Usain Bolt

ruction worker in south India is being compared to the Olympic gold medallist sprinter Usain Bolt after a record-breaking win in a buffalo race.

Srinivas Gowda, 28, was competing in Kambala, a sport from the southern state of Karnataka where people sprint 142m through paddy fields with buffalo.

Mr Gowda is said to have finished in 13.42 seconds. Bolt holds the world 100m record of 9.58 seconds.

But the governing body for Kambala has warned against comparing him to Bolt.

“We would not like to indulge in any comparison with others,” Prof K Gunapala Kadamba, president of the Kambala Academy, told BBC Hindi.

“They [Olympic event monitors] have more scientific methods and better electronic equipment to measure speed.”

Prof Kadamba’s response came after several local newspapers and journalists made the comparison between Mr Gowda’s performance and the Jamaican sprinter’s world record time.Skip Twitter post by @ChethanAzaad

Chethan Azad@ChethanAzaad

#SrinivasGowda from Miyar Moodabidre runs 100m in 9.55 seconds to break #UsainBolt record of 9.58 seconds in Aikala #Kambala. He has run 142.4m in 13.62 seconds in Kambala race. #HumFitToIndiaFit

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DP SATISH@dp_satish

He is Srinivasa Gowda (28) from Moodabidri in Dakshina Kannada district. Ran 142.5 meters in just 13.62 seconds at a “Kambala” or Buffalo race in a slushy paddy field. 100 meters in JUST 9.55 seconds! @usainbolt took 9.58 seconds to cover 100 meters. #Karnataka

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But Mr Gowda, from Moodabidri in Karnataka’s coastal district of Dakshina Kannada, was excited about his record-breaking win and praised his teammates – the two buffalo he ran alongside – for doing so well.

Srinivas Gowda
Image captionSrinivas Gowda, 28, has been taking part in Kambala for seven years

He told BBC Hindi he had taken part in Kambala for seven years, adding: “I got interested in it because I used to watch Kambala during my school days.”

What is Kambala?

Kambala, which roughly translates to “paddy-growing mud field” in the local language Tulu, is a traditional sport originating from part of Karnataka’s coast.

Participants sprint through a field, which is normally either 132m or 142m, with two buffalo that are tethered together.

It is controversial, and in the past the sport has attracted strong criticism from international animal rights groups.

In 2014, India’s Supreme Court issued a ban on races with bulls, prompted primarily by campaigns against the practice of Jallikattu, a form of bull-fighting from the neighbouring state of Tamil Nadu.

Two years later, Karnataka’s state court issued an interim order stopping all Kambala events.

Prof Kadamba said that the organising body had responded to this, updating the sport in order to make it more humane.

He said their current and former students – including Mr Gowda – are now taught how to deal with buffalo “in a humane manner without unnecessarily hurting the animal”.

In 2018, the state started allowing Kambala races to take part again, but issued several conditions – including a ban on the use of whips.

But the practice is still under threat. International animal rights group Peta has a petition pending in the Supreme Court, arguing that Karnataka’s reinstatement of Kambala was illegal.

“This Kambala is quite different from the traditional Kambala that used to be practised some decades ago,” Prof Kadamba added.

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Stephanie Simpson: New Zealand police find body of missing woman

lice looking for a British woman missing in New Zealand have said they have found her body.

Stephanie Simpson, 32, from Essex, is thought to have died in a “tragic accident” while on a hike last weekend in Mount Aspiring National Park.

Searchers made the discovery at about 13:40 New Zealand time (00:40 GMT) on Friday in the Pyke Creek area, New Zealand Police said.

She appeared to have been washed into a canyon after going into water.

Ms Simpson, from the Basildon area, was reported missing on Monday, when a search began in the national park in the country’s Southern Alps region on its South Island.

According to her Facebook account, she had been living in the Wanaka area since November and was working as a landscaper.

A thermal-imaging drone, dog teams, helicopter and search teams failed to find any sign of her on Thursday, and police in New Zealand had said the search was difficult due to the size and terrain of the area.

Mount Aspiring National Park
Image captionThe wilderness of Mount Aspiring National Park attracts a range of outdoor enthusiasts

The search continued on Friday with more teams, who focused on the Pyke area of the park.

Her body was located after aerial searches provided images of the area and her boots and backpack were spotted, police said.

Sgt Mark Kirkwood, from West Coast Search and Rescue, told the BBC there were no suspicious circumstances surrounding Ms Simpson’s death and it appeared to be a tragic accident.

It seemed that she had left the hiking track, taken off her boots and gone into a waterfall, he said.

Her body was found in a canyon in the Pyke Creek area, which suggested she had been washed down into it. Her boots were about 900m (2,953 ft) upstream from where her body was discovered and her backpack was nearer to her.

“It’s a very hazardous area. We have no idea why she went into the water,” Sgt Kirkwood said.

Her body was identified by her mother and other family who were at the search site after travelling to New Zealand from the UK.

Stephanie Simpson
Image captionStephanie Simpson is thought to have been an experienced hiker

Sgt Kirkwood said police wanted to thank all those involved in the search for their “considerable efforts”.

“The search was extremely challenging at times, especially in consideration of the terrain, and the work of all involved is to be commended,” he said.

“Police extend their condolences to Stephanie’s family at this tragic time.”

The death will be referred to the coroner.

A crowdfunding page has been set up by a friend to support the LANDSAR rescue team.

South Basildon and East Thurrock MP Stephen Metcalfe said on Twitter: “So sorry to hear that police in New Zealand have found the body of missing British (from Basildon) hiker Stephanie Simpson.

“I can only imagine the pain the family must feel and send my heartfelt condolences to family and friends.”

The Foreign and Commonwealth Office said its staff were “supporting the family of a British woman following her death in New Zealand”.

“They have our deepest sympathies, and we will continue to do all we can for them,” a spokesman said.

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Coronavirus in the UK: Five things you need to know about Covid-19

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Coronavirus in the UK: Five things you need to know about Covid-19

Covid-19 has been causing severe lung disease in China but has also been confirmed in other countries, including the UK.

With many having died from the coronavirus outbreak, and with no sign of it stopping soon, the BBC’s medical correspondent Fergus Walsh assesses how worried we should be and how we can avoid it.

  • 12 Feb 2020

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Coronavirus in the UK: Five things you need to know about Covid-19

-19 has been causing severe lung disease in China but has also been confirmed in other countries, including the UK.

With many having died from the coronavirus outbreak, and with no sign of it stopping soon, the BBC’s medical correspondent Fergus Walsh assesses how worried we should be and how we can avoid it.

  • 12 Feb 2020

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Coronavirus: What it does to the body

Fighting the new coronavirus has been a battle against the unknown for doctors.

How does it attack the body? What are the full range of symptoms? Who is more likely to be seriously ill or die? How do you treat it?

Now, an account by medics on the front line of this epidemic, at the Jinyintan Hospital, in Wuhan, is starting to provide answers.

A detailed analysis of the first 99 patients treated there has been published in the Lancet medical journal.

Lung assault

All of the 99 patients taken to the hospital had pneumonia – their lungs were inflamed and the tiny sacs where oxygen moves from the air to the blood were filling with water.

Other symptoms were:

  • 82 had fever
  • 81 had a cough
  • 31 had shortness of breath
  • 11 had muscle ache
  • nine had confusion
  • eight had a headache
  • five had a sore throat

First deaths

The first two patients to die were seemingly healthy, although they were long-term smokers and that would have weakened their lungs.

The first, a 61-year-old man, had severe pneumonia when he arrived at hospital.

He was in acute respiratory distress, meaning his lungs were unable to provide enough oxygen to his organs to keep his body alive.

Despite being put on a ventilator, his lungs failed and his heart stopped beating.

He died 11 days after he was admitted.

Cases of coronavirus outside China

The second patient, a 69-year-old man, also had acute respiratory distress syndrome.

He was attached to an artificial lung or ECMO (extra-corporeal membrane oxygenation) machine but this wasn’t enough.

He died of severe pneumonia and septic shock when his blood pressure collapsed.

At least 10% die

As of 25 January, of the 99 patients:

  • 57 were still in hospital
  • 31 had been discharged
  • 11 had died

This does not mean the death rate of the disease is 11%, though, as some of those still in hospital may yet die and many others have such mild symptoms they do not end up in hospital.

Market workers

Live animals sold at the Huanan seafood market are thought to be the source of the infection, called 2019-nCoV.

And 49 out of the 99 patients had a direct connection to the market:

  • 47 worked there, either as managers or manning the stalls
  • two were shoppers who had only popped in

Middle-aged men worst affected

Most of the 99 patients were middle-aged, with an average age of 56 – and 67 of them were men.

However, more recent figures suggest a more even gender split. The China Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said 1.2 men were infected for every 1.0 women.

There are two possible explanations for the difference:

  • Men could be more likely to become severely ill and need hospital treatment
  • Men, for social or cultural reasons, may have been more likely to be exposed to the virus at the beginning of the outbreak

Dr Li Zhang, at the hospital, says: “The reduced susceptibility of females to viral infections could be attributed to the protection from X chromosome and sex hormones, which play an important role in immunity.”

And those who were already sick

Most of the 99 had other diseases that may have made them more vulnerable to the virus as a “result of the weaker immune functions of these patients”:

  • 40 had a weak heart or damaged blood vessels due to conditions including heart disease, heart failure and stroke
  • A further 12 patients had diabetes

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Coronavirus: What are the symptoms and how do I protect myself?

using severe lung disease that started in China has spread to other countries, including the UK.

The coronavirus had infected 63,922 people in China as of 14 February, with 1,381 of them dying.

What are the symptoms?

It seems to start with a fever, followed by a dry cough.

After a week, it leads to shortness of breath and some patients require hospital treatment. Notably, the infection rarely seems to cause a runny nose or sneezing.

Infographic showing the symptoms of the coronavirus

The incubation period – between infection and showing any symptoms – lasts up to 14 days, according to the World Health Organization (WHO).

But some researchers say it may be as long as 24 days.

And Chinese scientists say some people may be infectious even before their symptoms appear.

How deadly is the coronavirus?

Based on data from 17,000 patients with this coronavirus, the WHO says:

  • 82% develop mild symptoms
  • 15% develop severe symptoms
  • 3% become critically ill

The proportion dying from the disease, which has been named Covid-19, appears low (between 1% and 2%) – but the figures are unreliable.

Thousands are still being treated but may go on to die – so the death rate could be higher.

But it is also unclear how many mild cases remain unreported – so the death rate could also be lower.

To put this it into context, about one billion people catch influenza every year, with between 290,000 and 650,000 deaths. The severity of flu changes every year.

Can coronavirus be treated or cured?

Right now, treatment relies on the basics – keeping the patient’s body going, including breathing support, until their immune system can fight off the virus.

However, the work to develop a vaccine is under way and it is hoped there will be human trials before the end of the year.

Hospitals are also testing anti-viral drugs to see if they have an impact.

Series of maps showing the spread of coronavirus

How can I protect myself?

The WHO says:

  • Wash your hands – soap or hand gel can kill the virus
  • Cover your mouth and nose when coughing or sneezing – ideally with a tissue – and wash your hands afterwards, to prevent the virus spreading
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth – if your hands touch a surface contaminated by the virus, this could transfer it into your body
  • Don’t get too close to people coughing, sneezing or with a fever – they can propel small droplets containing the virus into the air – ideally, keep 1m (3ft) away

How fast is it spreading?

Thousands of new cases are being reported each day.

However, analysts believe the true scale could be 10 times larger than official figures.

The number of cases is thought to be doubling every five to seven days.

World map showing spread of Coronavirus outside China. Japan has 251 cases, Singapore 58, Thailand 33, South Korea 28, Taiwan 18, Malaysia 18, Germany 16, Vitenam 16, Australia 15, USA 15, France 11, UK 9

The WHO says the outbreak, which it has declared a global emergency, can be contained.

But some experts, including a former head of the US Centers for Disease Control, say it could become a pandemic – a global epidemic.Skip Twitter post by @DrTomFrieden

Dr. Tom Frieden@DrTomFrieden

It’s highly likely that #2019nCov will be a #pandemic, spreading beyond #China. We don’t know yet whether the pandemic will be mild, moderate or severe. Key is to find and implement the best ways to protect people.

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With colds and flu tending to spread fastest in the winter, there is hope the turning of the seasons may help stem the outbreak.

School holidays may also help to slow its spread.

However, a different strain of coronavirus – Middle East respiratory syndrome – emerged in the summer, in Saudi Arabia, so there’s no guarantee warmer weather will halt the outbreak.

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Coronavirus: Can it spread via door handles? And other questions

There have now been more than 43,000 cases of the new coronavirus, which has been declared a global health emergency. The disease has spread to many countries, including the UK.

The BBC News Health team’s answers to a selection of readers’ questions about the new virus are below.

Can coronavirus be transmitted by things like door handles and how long does it survive? – Jean Jimenez, Panama

If someone infected with the virus coughs on to their hand and then touches something, that surface may become contaminated. Door handles are a good example of a surface that might pose a risk.

It’s not yet known how long the new coronavirus might be able to live on such surfaces. Experts suspect it is hours rather than days but it is best to wash your hands regularly to help reduce the risk of infection and spread of the virus.

Does climate and temperature affect the transmission of the coronavirus? – Ariyana, Märkisch-Oderland, Germany

We still have much to learn about this virus. It is not yet clear whether seasonal temperature changes will affect its spread.

Some other viruses, such as flu, follow a seasonal pattern, peaking in colder months. There is some research suggesting Middle East respiratory syndrome (Mers) – another virus from the same family as coronavirus – is influenced by climate conditions, being slightly more common in warmer months.

Can you catch the virus from food prepared by an infected individual? – Sean McIntyre, Brisbane, Australia

Someone infected with coronavirus could potentially pass it on to someone else if the food they prepare has not been handled hygienically. Coronavirus can be spread by cough droplets on hands. Washing your hands before touching and eating food is good advice for anyone, to stop the spread of germs.

People in face masks in a supermarket in Beijing, China

Once you’ve had coronavirus, will you then be immune? – Denise Mitchell, Bicester, Oxfordshire

When people recover from an infection, their body is left with some memory of how to fight it should they encounter it again. This immunity is not always long-lasting or totally efficient, however, and can decrease over time. It is not known how long immunity might last after being infected.

What are differences between coronavirus and flu? – Brent Starr, Gresham, Oregon, US

Coronavirus and flu share many similar symptoms, making it difficult to diagnose without a test. The main coronavirus symptoms to look out for are fever and a cough. Flu often has other symptoms too, such as aching muscles and a sore throat, while people with coronavirus may feel short of breath.

Anyone who suspects they may have caught coronavirus, because they have had close contact with another infected person or have travelled to an area where the virus is circulating, should talk to their doctor.

Is a face mask useful against the virus and how often does it have to be replaced? – Tom Lim, Bali, Indonesia

There is very little evidence wearing face masks makes a difference. Experts say good hygiene – such as regularly washing your hands and certainly before putting them near your mouth – is vastly more effective.

Protective face masks in Bangkok, Thailand

Can coronavirus be transmitted sexually? – David Cheong, Singapore

It is not clear yet whether this is a route of transmission we should be concerned about. Currently, coughs and sneezes are thought to be the main source of spread.

What is the incubation period for the coronavirus? – Gillian Gibs

The World Health Organization says the incubation period, which is the time before symptoms appear, ranges from two to 10 days.

These estimates will be narrowed down as more data becomes available.

Do people who have contracted coronavirus return to full health? – Chris Stepney, Milton Keynes

Yes. Many of those who contract coronavirus will experience only mild symptoms and most people are expected to make a full recovery.

However, it can pose a particular risk for elderly people and those with pre-existing problems such as diabetes or cancer, or weak immune systems.

An expert at China’s National Health Commission has said it can take a week to recover from mild coronavirus symptoms.

Can the coronavirus be transferred through items bought from Wuhan and posted to UK? – Stefan

There is no evidence this is a risk. Some diseases, including coronavirus, can spread through surfaces contaminated by people coughing or sneezing on them, but it is thought that the virus does not survive for long. Something that has been sent in the post is unlikely to be contaminated by the time it arrives at its destination.

Media captionSea urchins and Swiss rolls: Quarantine around the world

Is there any reason such viruses are emerging more from China? – Gautam

Yes – large populations of people living in close proximity to animals.

This coronavirus almost certainly came from an animal source – a bat, although this may not be the host that spread it to people. Sars, another coronavirus that originated in China, came from bats and the civet cat.

The early cases of this new infection were traced to the South China Seafood Wholesale Market, where live wild animals were also sold, including chickens, bats and snakes.

Is it possible to vaccinate in order to prevent this respiratory illness? – Hans Friedrich

At the moment, there is no vaccine that can protect people against this type of coronavirus but researchers are looking to develop one.

It is a new strain that hasn’t been seen in humans before, which means doctors still

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Coronavirus super-spreaders: Why are they important?

preading, where individual patients pass on an infection to large numbers of people, is a feature of nearly every outbreak.

It is not their fault but can have a significant impact on how diseases spread.

There are reports of super-spreading during the new coronavirus outbreak, which has centred on Wuhan, in China.

Briton Steve Walsh, who had been in Singapore, has been linked to four cases in the UK, five in France and possibly one in Majorca.

Coronavirus claims 97 lives in one day

Four more people diagnosed in UK

How worried should we be?

What it does to the body

What is a super-spreader?

It is a bit of a vague term, with no strict scientific definition.

But it is when a patient infects significantly more people than usual.

On average, each person infected with the new coronavirus is passing it on to between two and three other people.

But this is only an average; some people will pass it on to nobody while others pass their infection on to far more.

How big can a super-spreading event be?

Massive – and they can have a huge effect on an outbreak.

Health workers take part in the funeral of Ebola victims at Kitatumba cemetery in Butembo, North Kivu province
Image captionMost Ebola cases came from a small number of patients

In 2015, a super-spreading event led to 82 people being infected from a single hospital patient with Middle East respiratory syndrome (Mers), a coronavirus distantly related to the current virus

And in the Ebola epidemic in West Africa, the vast majority of cases (61%) came from just a tiny handful of patients (3%).

“There were more than 100 new chains of transmission from just one funeral in June 2014,” Dr Nathalie MacDermott, from King’s College London, says.

Why do some people spread more?

Some just come into contact with far more people – either because of their job or where they live – and that means they can spread more of the disease, whether or not they themselves have symptoms.

“Kids are good at that – that’s why closing schools can be a good measure,” Dr John Edmunds, from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, says.

“Commercial sex workers were very important in spreading HIV,” Prof Mark Woolhouse, from the University of Edinburgh, says .

Others are “super-shedders”, who release unusually large amounts of virus (or other bug) from their bodies, so anybody coming into contact with them is more likely to become infected.

Hospitals treating severe acute respiratory syndrome (Sars) became a major centre of super-spreading because the sickest patients were also the most infectious and they came into contact with lots of healthcare workers.

How do they change an outbreak?

“It plays a big role at the beginning of any outbreak, when the virus is trying to get established,” Dr Edmunds told BBC News.

New infections, including the coronavirus, come from animals.

When it makes the jump into the first patient, the disease might fizzle out before it can cause a large outbreak.

But if it can quickly find its way into a super-spreader, then it gives the outbreak a boost. The same rules apply when cases are imported into other countries.

“If you have several super-spreaders in close proximity, you’re going to struggle to contain your outbreak,” Dr MacDermott says.

What will it take to stop coronavirus if there is super-spreading?

Super-spreading of the new coronavirus would not be a surprise and will not significantly change how the disease is managed.

At the moment, we are completely reliant on identifying cases and anyone they have come into contact with quickly.

“It makes that even more important – you can’t afford too many mistakes, you can’t afford to miss the super-spreader,” Prof Woolhouse says.

Is it the super-spreader’s fault?

Historically, there has been a tendency to demonise the super-spreader.

Mary Mallon
Image captionMary Mallon was blamed for super-spreading typhoid

“Typhoid Mary”, Irish cook Mary Mallon (1869-1938), unknowingly passed on typhoid fever when she had no symptoms and ended up spending decades in exile and forced quarantine.

But in reality, it’s not the patient’s fault.

“We need to be careful of the language we use,” Dr MacDermott says.

“They haven’t done anything wrong, this is an infection picked up through no fault of their own.

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Coronavirus: China and the virus that threatens everything

On a cold Beijing morning, on an uninspiring, urban stretch of the Tonghui river, a lone figure could be seen writing giant Chinese characters in the snow.

The message taking shape on the sloping concrete embankment was to a dead doctor.

“Goodbye Li Wenliang!” it read, with the author using their own body to make the imprint of that final exclamation mark.

Five weeks earlier, Dr Li had been punished by the police for trying to warn colleagues about the dangers of a strange new virus infecting patients in his hospital in the Chinese city of Wuhan.

Now he’d succumbed to the illness himself and pictures of that frozen tribute spread fast on the Chinese internet, capturing in physical form a deep moment of national shock and anger.

A worker wears a protective mask while cleaning construction waste at WuhanKeting on February 4th.2020 in Wuhan.Hubei Province,China.
Image captionA worker in a Chinese factory wears a protective mask

There’s still a great deal we don’t know about Covid-19, to give the disease caused by the virus its official name. Before it took its final fatal leap across the species barrier to infect its first human, it is likely to have been lurking inside the biochemistry of an – as yet unidentified – animal. That animal, probably infected after the virus made an earlier zoological jump from a bat, is thought to have been kept in a Wuhan market, where wildlife was traded illegally.

Beyond that, the scientists trying to map its deadly trajectory from origin to epidemic can say little more with any certainty.

But while they continue their urgent, vital work to determine the speed at which it spreads and the risks it poses, one thing is beyond doubt. A month or so on from its discovery, Covid-19 has shaken Chinese society and politics to the core.

That tiny piece of genetic material, measured in ten-thousandths of a millimetre, has set in train a humanitarian and economic catastrophe counted in more than 1,000 Chinese lives and tens of billions of Chinese yuan. It has closed off whole cities, placing an estimated 70 million residents in effective quarantine, shutting down transport links and restricting their ability to leave their homes. And it has exposed the limits of a political system for which social control is the highest value, breaching the rigid layers of censorship with a tsunami of grief and rage.

The risk for the ruling elite is obvious.

It can be seen in their response, ordering into action the military, the media and every level of government from the very top to the lowliest village committee.

Map showing confirmed cases in China

The consequences are now entirely dependent on questions no one knows the answers to; can they pull off the complex task of bringing a runaway epidemic under control, and if so, how long might it take?

Across the world, people seem unsure how to respond to the small number of cases being detected in their own countries. The public mood can swing between panic – driven by the pictures of medical workers in hazmat suits – to complacency, brought on by headlines that suggest the risk is no worse than flu. The evidence from China suggests that both responses are misguided. Seasonal flu may well have a low fatality rate, measured in fractions of 1%, but it’s a problem because it affects so many people around the world.

Graphic showing rising number of coronavirus deaths in China

The tiny proportion killed out of the many, many millions who catch it each year still numbers in the hundreds of thousands – individually tragic, collectively a major healthcare burden.

Very early estimates suggested the new virus may be at least as deadly as flu – precisely why so much effort is now going into stopping it becoming another global pandemic. But one new estimate suggests it could prove even deadlier yet, killing as many as 1% of those who contract it. For any individual, that risk is still relatively small, although it’s worth noting such estimates are averages – just like flu, the risks fall more heavily on the elderly and already infirm.

Patient in hospital bed in Wuhan
Image captionDespite the death toll, an increasing number of patients are recovering

But China’s experience of this epidemic demonstrates two things. Firstly, it offers a terrifying glimpse of the potential effect on a healthcare system when you scale up infections of this kind of virus across massive populations. Two new hospitals have had to be built in Wuhan in a matter of days, with beds for 2,600 patients, and giant stadiums and hotels are being used as quarantine centres, for almost 10,000 more.

Despite these efforts, many have still struggled to find treatment, with reports of people dying at home, unregistered in the official figures. Secondly, it highlights the importance of taking the task of containing outbreaks of new viruses extremely seriously. The best approach, most experts agree, is one based on transparency and trust, with good public information and proportionate, timely government action.

But in an authoritarian system, with strict censorship and an emphasis on political stability above all else, transparency and trust are in short supply.

Media captionAerial time-lapse shows Wuhan hospital construction

China’s response may have sometimes looked like panic – with what’s been called the “biggest quarantine in history” and harsh enforcement against those who disobey.

But those measures have become necessary only because its initial response looked like the very definition of complacency.

There’s ample evidence that the warning signs were missed by the authorities, and worse, ignored. By late December, medical staff in Wuhan were beginning to notice unusual symptoms of viral pneumonia, with a cluster linked to the market trading in illegal wildlife. On 30 December, Dr Li Wenliang, an ophthalmologist working in Wuhan’s Central Hospital, posted his concerns in a private medical chat group, advising colleagues to take measures to protect themselves. He’d seen seven patients who appeared to be suffering with an illness similar to Sars – another coronavirus that began in an illegal Chinese wildlife market in 2002 and went on to kill 774 people worldwide.

A few days later, he was summoned by the police.

Dr Li was made to sign a confession, denouncing the messages he’d posted as “illegal behaviour”.

The case received national media attention, with a high-profile state-run TV report announcing that in total, eight people in Wuhan were being investigated for “spreading rumours”. The authorities, though, were well aware of the outbreak of illness. The day after Dr Li posted his message, China notified the World Health Organization, and the day after that, the suspected source – the market – was closed down.

But despite the multiplying cases and the concerns among medics that human-to-human transmission was taking place, the authorities did little to protect the public. Doctors were already setting up quarantine rooms and anticipating extra admissions when Wuhan held its important annual political gathering, the city’s People’s Congress.

In their speeches, the Communist Party leaders made no mention of the virus. China’s National Health Commission continued to report that the number of infections was limited and that there was no clear evidence that the disease could spread between humans.

And on 18 January the Wuhan authorities allowed a massive community banquet to take place, involving more than 40,000 families. The aim was to set a record fo

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Coronavirus: UK businessman linked to virus cases speaks out

h man linked to 11 coronavirus cases has spoken for the first time, saying he has “fully recovered” from the illness.

Steve Walsh, who remains quarantined in hospital, says his thoughts are with others who have contracted the virus.

He said his family have been asked to isolate themselves “as a precaution”.

Meanwhile, Health Secretary Matt Hancock warned that the spread of the coronavirus would worsen before it improved.

“Dealing with this disease is a marathon, not a sprint,” he told MPs in the Commons.

“We will do everything that is effective to tackle this virus and keep people safe.”

Mr Walsh, from Hove, who works for a firm providing gas analysis equipment, caught the virus in Singapore and is thought to have infected 11 others at a French ski resort.

Five of the cases linked to Mr Walsh are in England, five are in France and one is in Majorca, Spain.

Two of the people who contracted coronavirus at the chalet where Steve Walsh stayed are Bob Saynor and his wife, Catriona Greenwood.

She worked as a locum GP at the County Oak medical centre in Brighton, which was temporarily closed on Monday.

Eight people have tested positive for the virus in the UK so far.

One of those infected is an A&E worker at Worthing Hospital in West Sussex, the Department of Health said on Tuesday.

All services at the hospital continue to operate as normal, a spokeswoman for the department said.

Public Health England is contacting the very small number of patients who were seen by the A&E worker, who had followed advice to self-isolate.

Quarantine powers ‘proportionate’

There have now been more than 40,000 cases of coronavirus worldwide, which has been declared a global health emergency. The death toll in China stands at 1,016.

On Monday, the government issued new powers in England to keep people in quarantine to stop the virus spreading.

Under the Department of Health measures people will not be free to leave quarantine, and can be forcibly sent into isolation if they pose a threat.

Mr Hancock said these powers were “proportionate” and will “help us slow down transmission of the virus”.

The health secretary also announced that “a capital facility” was being launched immediately “to support any urgent works the NHS needs for the coronavirus response, such as the creation of further isolation areas and other necessary facilities”.

Speaking on a visit to Birmingham, Prime Minister Boris Johnson said the public had “every reason to be confident and calm” about the threat of the virus, adding: “We have got a fantastic NHS”.

Meanwhile, the government has asked medical suppliers to carry out a risk assessment on the impact of coronavirus and travel restrictions introduced by the Chinese government.

Companies have also been asked to retain existing stockpiles of medical supplies, which had been compiled as a contingency measure ahead of Breixt, the Department of Health said.

The department said there were no current medicine shortages in the UK linked to the outbreak and the measures were precautionary.

Mark Carney, governor of the Bank of England, described the economic impact of the virus in the UK as “containable”.

In other developments:

  • As of Tuesday afternoon, a total of 1,358 people have been tested for coronavirus, of which eight were confirmed positive
  • Among those quarantined on the Wirral is nine-year-old Jasmine Siddle from Northumberland, who had to spend her birthday in hospital
  • Patcham Nursing Home in Brighton confirmed on Tuesday that it has “closed to all visitors” as a precaution after one of the infected GPs visited a patient there
  • Another branch of the County Oak medical centre in Brighton – located less than two miles away in Deneway – was also closed on Tuesday, along with the Haven Practice in Brighton
  • All three surgeries are expected to reopen on Wednesday after deep cleaning
  • The World Health Organization said it now has a name for the new coronavirus – Covid-19
A man in protective clothing cleaning the County Oak medical centre
Image captionCounty Oak medical centre in Brighton was closed for cleaning on Monday

Mr Walsh contracted the coronavirus at a work conference in Singapore, before travelling to a French ski resort for a holiday on his way back to the UK.

In a statement from quarantine in Guy’s Hospital in London, Mr Walsh, a cub scout leader, thanked the NHS for their care.

He said he contacted his GP, NHS 111 and Public Health England, on learning he had been exposed to a confirmed case of coronavirus.

He added: “I was advised to attend an isolated room at hospital, despite showing no symptoms, and subsequently self-isolated at home as instructed.

“When the diagnosis was confirmed I was sent to an isolation unit in hospital, where I remain, and, as a precaution, my family was also asked to isolate themselves.”

He thanked friends, family and colleagues for their support, adding: “I ask the media to respect our privacy.”

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What are the symptoms of coronavirus and what can help stop its spread?

The main signs of infection are fever (high temperature) and a cough as well as shortness of breath and breathing difficulties.

Frequent hand washing with soap or gel, avoiding close contact with people who are ill and not touching your eyes, nose and mouth with unwashed hands, can help cut the risk of infection.

Catching coughs and sneezes in a tissue, binning it and washing your hands can minimise the risk of spreading disease.

Anyone experiencing symptoms, even if mild, after travelling from mainland China, Thailand, Japan, Republic of Korea, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Singapore, Malaysia or Macau, is advised to stay indoors and call the NHS 111 phone service.

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In a statement, Servomex, Mr Walsh’s employer, said it continues to “provide support” to him and his family.

It added that it had enforced travel restrictions and self-isolation for employees who attended the Singapore conference or who have shown symptoms of the virus.

Last month, two other people – who are related – were confirmed as having coronavirus after being taken ill at a hotel in York.

It was later revealed that one is a student at the University of York.


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Frozen-egg storage 10-year limit ‘could be extended’

The period of time for which eggs, sperm and embryos can be frozen could be extended, as the government calls for views on the current 10-year limit.

It said women’s choices on when to have children were being restricted, despite advances in freezing technology.

Only the eggs of people whose fertility may be affected by disease can be kept for longer – up to 55 years.

The regulator said the time was right to consider a “more appropriate” storage limit.

So the government has now launched a consultation on the current law.

It will also consider the safety and quality of eggs, embryos and sperm stored for more than 10 years and any additional demand for storage facilities that could result.

‘Heart-breaking decision’

“Although this could affect any one of us, I am particularly concerned by the impact of the current law on women’s reproductive choices,” said Caroline Dinenage, a minister in the Department of Health.

“A time limit can often mean women are faced with the heart-breaking decision to destroy their frozen eggs or feel pressured to have a child before they are ready.”

A fertility charity has previously said women were being pushed to delay egg freezing later and later, because of the 10-year storage limit.

The number of women choosing to freeze their eggs has more than tripled in recent years, from 410 freezing cycles in 2012 to 1,462 in 2017.

Most – four out of five – are doing it for social reasons, to increase their chances of having a baby later in life, data suggests.

A much smaller number are freezing eggs before having unrelated medical treatment, such as to combat cancer.

Media captionAli’s egg freezing journey

The best time for a woman to freeze her eggs is before the age of 35, when the quality and number of eggs starts to decline – but the most common age for doing it is now 38.

Sally Cheshire, who chairs the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority, said the regulator had heard the voices of patient and doctors.

“While any change to the 10-year storage limit would be a matter for Parliament, as it requires a change in law, we believe the time is right to consider what a more appropriate storage limit could be that recognises both changes in science and in the way women are considering their fertility,” she said.

The consultation on gamete storage limits is online here.

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Coronavirus: More may need to self-isolate to stop spread – NHS boss

Many more people may be forced to self-isolate as part of efforts to stop the coronavirus spreading in Britain, the head of NHS England has warned.

Sir Simon Stevens said more than 80 people discharged from quarantine on Thursday set an “important example”.

Meanwhile, officials are tracing the contacts of the ninth person in the UK to test positive for the virus.

The woman went to hospital in an Uber, but Public Health England (PHE) said the driver is not at “high risk”.

The new case – announced on Wednesday evening – is the first to be identified in London after she contracted the virus in China.

She “self-presented” at the A&E department of University Hospital Lewisham on Sunday 9 February, hospital chief executive Ben Travis said.

PHE said the Uber driver is “not considered high risk” because the journey was less than 15 minutes and there was not “close sustained contact”.

Uber said it had temporarily suspended the driver’s account “out of an abundance of caution”. Asked if it would be compensating the driver for lost income, the company said: “We will be providing support to this driver.”

GMB legal director Susan Harris said: “If Uber is genuinely concerned for his well-being – or for that of the public – they must make sure he receives payment during this enforced period of unemployment.”

Mr Travis said the patient was immediately given a mask and escorted to be tested in a dedicated area outside the A&E building. After that, she was assessed further in an isolation room in the emergency department.

She was later discharged and taken home by ambulance.

All staff who had contact with the patient have been contacted, and two are undergoing “active surveillance” at home for 14 days on the advice of PHE, Mr Travis said.

On Wednesday, the test came back positive and she was taken for treatment at a specialist unit at St Thomas’ Hospital that evening.

Meanwhile, a nurse who went into self-isolation after showing symptoms after sustained contact with someone who was being tested for the virus, has criticised the lack of advice she was given by PHE.

The unnamed nurse told Brighton newspaper the Argus she was sent home in a taxi in which she wore a medical mask but the driver did not.

She said she called NHS 111 but had to wait 15 hours to get advice from PHE on how to get tested – and felt she was given little guidance on how to stop the spread of the virus.

In other developments:

‘Contain, delay, research, brace’

Meanwhile, more than 80 people who stayed in accommodation at Arrowe Park Hospital in Wirral for two weeks have left after testing negative for the new strain of coronavirus.

They are one of two groups of British nationals evacuated from Wuhan, with the second quarantined near Milton Keynes.

Matt Raw leaving quarantine in Wirral
Image captionRepatriated UK citizen Matt Raw punched the air in celebration as he left quarantine

Sir Simon said: “They have set an important example, recognising that over the coming weeks many more of us may need to self-isolate at home for a period to reduce this virus’s spread,” he said.

Matt Raw, one of those quarantined on the Wirral, said as he left the accommodation block: “It is absolutely lovely to be out and I’ll no doubt be going out for a pint a little bit later.”

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The challenges in containing the virus

Analysis box by Nick Triggle, health correspondent

The ninth UK case illustrates the challenge the authorities face in trying to contain the coronavirus.

The guidance is clear about what to do if you suspect you might be infected.

Phone NHS 111 and self-isolate yourself.

Jumping into an Uber and heading into a busy A&E unit – where there will be lots of people with potentially weakened immune systems – is the last thing someone should be doing.

We don’t know why the ninth case did this. They could have been unaware of the advice. They may have been scared.

Or they may have had trouble getting through to 111 or have been unhappy with the response.

I have heard from people who have self-isolated themselves after becoming ill after returning from one of the at-risk countries, but then complained they were frustrated about the slow response from the NHS.

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Prof Chris Whitty, England’s chief medical officer, told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme it was hoped China “gets on top of the epidemic”.

He said: “We basically have a strategy which depends upon four tactical aims: the first one is to contain; the second of these is to delay; the third of these is to do the science and the research; and the fourth is to mitigate so we can brace the NHS.”

Media captionChange in seasons ‘could slow down spread’ – England’s chief medical officer

In addition to the patient being treated in London, the UK’s nine coronavirus cases include two Chinese nationals who tested positive in York.

Another cluster of cases began with British businessman Steve Walsh – now recovered – who contracted the virus in Singapore and passed it to 11 people at a ski resort in France. Five of these returned to the UK.

Presentational grey line

What are the symptoms of coronavirus and what can help stop its spread?

The main signs of infection are fever (high temperature) and a cough as well as shortness of breath and breathing difficulties.

Frequent hand washing with soap or gel, avoiding close contact with people who are ill and not touching your eyes, nose and mouth with unwashed hands, can help cut the risk of infection.

Catching coughs and sneezes in a tissue, binning it and washing your hands can minimise the risk of spreading disease.

Anyone experiencing symptoms, even if mild, after travelling from mainland China, Thailand, Japan, Republic of Korea, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Singapore, Malaysia or Macau, is advised to stay indoors and call the NHS 111 phone service.

Presentational grey line

Read more about the coronavirus

Viruses

SHOULD WE WORRY? Our health correspondent explains

YOUR QUESTIONS: Can you get it more than once?

WHAT YOU CAN DO: Do masks really help?

UNDERSTANDING THE SPREAD: A visual guide to the outbreak

LIFE UNDER LOCKDOWN: A Wuhan diary

ECONOMIC IMPACT: Why much of ‘the world’s factory’ remains closed

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Do you have information to share about coronavirus in the UK? You can get in touch by emailing haveyoursay@bbc.co.uk.

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Are coronavirus tests flawed?

There are deep concerns laboratory tests are incorrectly telling people they are free of the coronavirus.

Stories in several countries suggest people are having up to six negative results before finally being diagnosed.

Meanwhile, officials in the epicentre of the epidemic, Hubei province, China, have started counting people with symptoms rather than using the tests for final confirmation.

As a result, nearly 15,000 new cases were reported on a single day – a quarter of all cases in this epidemic.

What are these tests and is there a problem with them?

They work by looking for the genetic code of the virus.

A sample is taken from the patient. Then, in the laboratory, the virus’s genetic code (if it’s there) is extracted and repeatedly copied, making tiny quantities vast and detectable.

These “RT-PCR” tests, widely used in medicine to diagnose viruses such as HIV and influenza, are normally highly reliable.

“They are very robust tests generally, with a low false-positive and a low false-negative rate,” Dr Nathalie MacDermott, of King’s College London, says.

But are things going wrong?

A study in the journal Radiology showed five out of 167 patients tested negative for the disease despite lung scans showing they were ill. They then tested positive for the virus at a later date.

And there are numerous anecdotal accounts.

These include that of Dr Li Wenliang, who first raised concerns about the disease and has been hailed as a hero in China after dying from it.

Dr Li shares a picture of himself in a gas mask from his hospital bed in Wuhan on Friday
Image captionDr Li posted a picture of himself on social media from his hospital bed, on 31 Jan. The next day, he said, he had been diagnosed for coronavirus

He said his test results had come back negative on multiple occasions before he had finally been diagnosed.

Chinese journalists have uncovered other cases of people testing negative six times before a seventh test confirmed they had the disease.

And similar issues have been raised in other affected countries, including Singapore and Thailand.

In the US, meanwhile, Dr Nancy Messonnier, of the the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, says some of its tests are producing “inconclusive” results.

What might be going on?

One possible explanation is the tests are accurate and the patients do not have coronavirus at the time of testing

It is also cough, cold and flu season in China and patients may confuse these illnesses for coronavirus.

“The early signs of coronavirus are very similar to other respiratory viruses,” Dr MacDermott says.

“Maybe they weren’t infected when first tested.

“Then, over the course of time, they became infected and later tested positive for the coronavirus. That’s a possibility.”

Another option is the patients do have the coronavirus but it is at such an early stage, there is not enough to detect.

Even though RT-PCR tests massively expand the amount of genetic material, they need something to work from.

“But that doesn’t make sense after six tests,” Dr MacDermott says.

“With Ebola, we always waited 72 hours after a negative result to give the virus time.”

Throat swab

Alternatively, there could be a problem with the way the tests are being conducted.

There are throat swabs and then there are throat swabs.

“Is it a dangle or a good rub?” asks Dr MacDermott.

And if the samples are not correctly stored and handled, the test may not work.

There has also been some discussion about whether doctors testing the back of the throat are looking in the wrong place.

This is a deep lung infection rather one in the nose and throat.

However, if a patient is coughing, then some virus should be being brought up to detect.

Virus
Image captionCoronaviruses are named for the tiny “crowns” that protrude from their surface

A final option is the RT-PCR test for the new coronavirus is based on flawed science.

In order to develop the test, researchers must first pick a section of the virus’s genetic code.

This is known as the primer. It binds with the matching code in the virus and helps bulk it up. Scientists try to pick a region of the virus’s code they do not think will mutate.

But if there is a poor match between the primer and the virus in the patient, then an infected patient could get a negative result.

At this stage, it is impossible to tell exactly what is going on so lessons for other countries are unclear.

“It is not going to change that much,” Dr MacDermott says.

“But it flags up that you have to test people again if they continue to have symptoms.”

Follow James on Twitter.

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Coronavirus: Beijing orders 14-day quarantine for returnees

jing has ordered everyone returning to the city to go into quarantine for 14 days or risk punishment in the latest attempt to contain the deadly new coronavirus, state media report.

Residents were told to “self-quarantine or go to designated venues to quarantine” after returning to the Chinese capital from holidays.

The measure came as Egypt confirmed the first coronavirus case in Africa.

Over 1,500 people have died from the virus, which originated in Wuhan city.

The notice on Friday from Beijing’s virus prevention working group was issued as residents returned from spending the Lunar New Year in other parts of China.

The holiday was extended this year to help contain the outbreak.

More than 20 million people live in Beijing.

China’s national health commission on Saturday reported 143 new deaths, bringing the toll to 1,523. All but four of the latest victims were in hard-hit Hubei province.

A further 2,641 people have been newly confirmed as infected, bringing the national total to 66,492.

Outside mainland China, there have been more than 500 cases in 24 countries, and three deaths: one each in Hong Kong, the Philippines and Japan.

A World Health Organization (WHO)-led mission to China will start its outbreak investigation work this weekend, focusing on how the virus – officially named Covid-19 – is spreading and its severity, director Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said.

The mission, including international experts, will also look at how and when more than 1,700 health workers contracted the virus.

The team consists of 12 international members and their 12 Chinese counterparts.

“Particular attention will be paid to understanding transmission of the virus, the severity of disease and the impact of ongoing response measures,” said Dr Mike Ryan, executive director of the WHO health emergencies programme.

Africa sees its first case

Egypt’s health ministry on Friday confirmed the first case of the coronavirus in Africa.

The ministry described the person as a foreigner, but did not disclose the nationality.

It said it had notified the WHO, and the patient had been placed in isolation in a hospital.

Experts had earlier warned that it may not be long before the first case was confirmed in Africa, given its increasingly close ties to China.

Chinese health workers die in the outbreak

Chinese officials say six health workers have died.

Zeng Yixin, vice minister of China’s National Health Commission, said 1,102 medical workers had been infected in Wuhan and another 400 in other parts of Hubei province.

“The duties of medical workers at the front are indeed extremely heavy; their working and resting circumstances are limited, the psychological pressures are great, and the risk of infection is high,” Mr Zeng said, as quoted by Reuters news agency.

Media captionMedics in Wuhan resort to shaving their heads in a bid to prevent cross-infection of the coronavirus

Local authorities have struggled to provide protective equipment such as respiratory masks, goggles and protective suits in hospitals in the area.

On 7 February, the plight of medical workers was highlighted by the death of Li Wenliang, a doctor at Wuhan Central Hospital who had tried to issue the first warning about the virus on 30 December.

He had sent out a warning to fellow medics but police told him to stop “making false comments”.

A wave of anger and grief flooded Chinese social media site Weibo when news of Dr Li’s death broke.

What are the other developments?

  • In the UK, health officials contacted hundreds of people who attended a conference in London, after it emerged that one of them was diagnosed with coronavirus
  • China said it would stagger the return of children to school – several provinces have closed schools until the end of February
  • In Vietnam, which borders China, thousands of people in villages near the capital, Hanoi, have been put under quarantine after several cases were discovered. Vietnam has now confirmed at least 16 cases
  • The Red Cross has called for sanctions relief for North Korea, which would allow the aid agency to transfer funds to buy equipment. Testing kits and protective clothing are urgently needed to prepare for a possible outbreak, it says

Read more about the coronavirus and its impact


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Why being gay in Russia is about ‘love and passion’

Why being gay in Russia is about ‘love and passion’

Jon and Alex, a gay couple from Russia, share an intimate moment at a small apartment in St Petersburg.

This secret glimpse into their private lives was captured by Danish photographer Mads Nissen and received the prestigious World Press Photo Award in 2015.

But while people across the globe were admiring Nissen’s work, life for Jon and Alex was only getting more difficult.

Members of the LGBT community in Russia say social stigma and risk of physical attacks have increased since the country approved the law banning ‘gay propaganda’ in 2013.

And for Jon, now that Alex is not alive, the picture is also a symbol of painful struggle and, ultimately, loss.

If you have been affected by any of the issues raised in this film, you can get advice and information here.

Reporter: Anastassia Zlatopolskai

Producer: Julia Malkin

  • 8h ago

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West Africa’s first drone corridor has opened in Njala

est Africa’s first drone corridor has opened in Njala

Sierra Leone has one of the world’s highest maternal mortality rates. A 2017 government report estimated 1,165 deaths per 100,000 live births in the country, largely due to preventable reasons. Bleeding, pregnancy-induced hypertension, infections, and unsafe abortions were the most common causes for women. However, a new drone initiative in the country could be about to change things.

Video journalist: Jack Burgess

Assistant camera: Melanie Brown

Discover more in CrowdScience from BBC World Service.

(Image: A nurse takes medical supplies from a drone. Credit: BBC.)

  • 10 Feb 2020

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Wearable to spot Alzheimer’s being developed

 ambitious project to develop a wearable device to detect early signs of Alzheimer’s disease has been launched.

The Early Detection of Neurodegenerative diseases (Edon) is being spearheaded by charity Alzheimer’s Research UK.

It will initially analyse data from continuing studies into the disease, using artificial intelligence.

And this data will be used to design a prototype device within three years.

Wearables collect a variety of data including gait, heart rate and sleep patterns and the hope is by analysing this data, researchers can begin to map signs of the disease years before symptoms develop.

‘Memory tests’

The global initiative has already won funding from tech founder turned philanthropist Bill Gates.

But it also forms part of the UK government’s wider ambition to use artificial intelligence and data to help better understand and prevent chronic diseases.

Initially, EDoN will work with the UK’s national institute for data science and artificial intelligence, The Alan Turing Institute, to trawl through data from continuing studies into Alzheimer’s disease.

Prof Chris Holmes, health programme director at the institute, said: “Artificial intelligence has the potential to transform the learning opportunities from large-scale data studies such as Edon by integrating information from multiple sources.

“We will use AI to deliver new insights into the early signals of disease by combining digital data measurements with traditional sources such as brain imaging and memory tests.”

‘Digital fingerprints’

There are currently 850,000 people living with dementia in the UK, according to Alzheimer’s Research UK.

And globally, the number is expected to increase from 50 million in 2018 to 152 million in 2050.

Carol Routledge, director of research at Alzheimer’s Research UK, said: “Developing digital fingerprints that can be detected using phone apps or wearable technologies like smart watches would provide a low-cost approach to identifying those most at risk of disease.

“Identifying the very earliest changes in these diseases would transform research efforts today, giving us the best chance of stopping these diseases before the symptoms of dementia start to get in the way of life.”

Volunteers to wear the device and share their data will come from another ambitious UK health project, the Accelerating Detection of Disease Programme.

Launched last year as part of the government’s mission to transform the diagnosis of disease using data and AI, it aims to recruit five million volunteers.

As well as Alzheimer’s research, those who sign up will contribute to studies on cancer and heart disease.

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WHO says fake coronavirus claims causing ‘infodemic’

Health Organization (WHO) is urging tech companies to take tougher action to battle fake news on the coronavirus.

The push comes as a representative from the WHO travelled to Silicon Valley to speak directly to tech firms about the spread of false information.

The WHO has labelled the spread of fake news on the outbreak an “infodemic”.

Over 1,000 people have died as a result of the outbreak, which began in central China but has spread globally.

Andrew Pattison, digital business solutions manager, for the WHO said false information was “spreading faster than the virus”.

Bogus claims that the virus was spread by eating bat soup or could be cured by garlic have already swept the web.

‘Not based on science’

Mr Pattison spoke on Thursday to a meeting of tech companies hosted at Facebook’s headquarters in Mountain View California.

Other firms in attendance included Google, Apple, Airbnb, Lyft, Uber and Salesforce.

Earlier in the week, he held talks with Amazon, at the e-commerce giant’s headquarters in Seattle.

tiktok posts

Since the outbreak of the coronavirus was labelled a public health emergency, books on the disease – which Mr Pattison said were not “based on science” – have been popping up for sale on the e-retailer.

The WHO is also concerned that when users search for the term coronavirus on Amazon, listings for face masks and vitamin C boosters come up. Vitamin C has been listed as one of the fake cures for coronavirus.

Social media firms have already taken some steps to remove false claims and promote accurate information.

Facebook, Twitter, Youtube and TikTok are already directing users that search for coronavirus on their sites to the WHO or local health organisations.

People searching on Google’s search engines, meanwhile, are shown news and safety tips. Facebook has said it will use its existing network of third-party fact-checkers to debunk false claims.

Mr Pattison said this was an opportunity for these firms to rethink how they addressed misinformation.

“I think what would be very exciting is to see this emergency changed into a long-term sustainable model, where we can have responsible content on these platforms.”

The WHO has faced criticism of its own for the way it has tried to manage the crisis.

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Health Organization (WHO) is urging tech companies to take tougher action to battle fake news on the coronavirus.

The push comes as a representative from the WHO travelled to Silicon Valley to speak directly to tech firms about the spread of false information.

The WHO has labelled the spread of fake news on the outbreak an “infodemic”.

Over 1,000 people have died as a result of the outbreak, which began in central China but has spread globally.

Andrew Pattison, digital business solutions manager, for the WHO said false information was “spreading faster than the virus”.

Bogus claims that the virus was spread by eating bat soup or could be cured by garlic have already swept the web.

‘Not based on science’

Mr Pattison spoke on Thursday to a meeting of tech companies hosted at Facebook’s headquarters in Mountain View California.

Other firms in attendance included Google, Apple, Airbnb, Lyft, Uber and Salesforce.

Earlier in the week, he held talks with Amazon, at the e-commerce giant’s headquarters in Seattle.

tiktok posts

Since the outbreak of the coronavirus was labelled a public health emergency, books on the disease – which Mr Pattison said were not “based on science” – have been popping up for sale on the e-retailer.

The WHO is also concerned that when users search for the term coronavirus on Amazon, listings for face masks and vitamin C boosters come up. Vitamin C has been listed as one of the fake cures for coronavirus.

Social media firms have already taken some steps to remove false claims and promote accurate information.

Facebook, Twitter, Youtube and TikTok are already directing users that search for coronavirus on their sites to the WHO or local health organisations.

People searching on Google’s search engines, meanwhile, are shown news and safety tips. Facebook has said it will use its existing network of third-party fact-checkers to debunk false claims.

Mr Pattison said this was an opportunity for these firms to rethink how they addressed misinformation.

“I think what would be very exciting is to see this emergency changed into a long-term sustainable model, where we can have responsible content on these platforms.”

The WHO has faced criticism of its own for the way it has tried to manage the crisis.

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A collection of samples provided by Facebook of the content posted by the two operations

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  • 14 February 2020

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A Facebook exec has claimed that the social media giant helped Trump get elected

Influencer posts not considered political ads

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Watching loved ones die without care in WuhanCan this adoption hoaxer be stopped?VIDEOIndonesia’s reformer president turns pragmatistVIDEOClimbing trees to save koalas on Kangaroo IslandWhy have two reporters in Wuhan disappeared?VIDEO’My home is visited by a million tourists a year’Why ‘snowflakes’ vs ‘gammons’ is bad for usPregnant actresses: ‘We’re not treated like people’The week in pictures

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Church of England to apologize for being ‘deeply institutionally racist’

 Church of England has decided to apologize for racism experienced by “countless black, Asian and minority ethnic people” over the past 70 years.The Church said in a statement that the General Synod, its legislative body, voted on Tuesday to issue an official apology and commission an outside expert to prepare a report on racism, race and ethnicity in the church.Invited to the UK decades ago, now they must prove they’re BritishSpeaking at the synod, the Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby, who is the church’s most senior bishop, said there was “no doubt” that the Church of England was still “deeply institutionally racist”.”We did not do justice in the past, we do not do justice now, and unless we are radical and decisive in this area in the future, we will still be having this conversation in 20 years time and still doing injustice,” he added.Welby was responding to a speech given by Reverend Andrew Moughtin-Mumby, a member of the synod from Southwark Diocese in London. Moughtin-Mumby introduced the motion that called for the apology, and told the synod about the harrowing experiences of the family of Doreen Browne, one of his parishioners.He said that in 1961, the family was barred from entering St Peter’s Church in Walworth, south London, because of the color of their skin.Church of England apologizes for saying only married heterosexuals should have sex“Doreen’s family suffered a horrible, humiliating racism which still affects Doreen’s relationship with the Church even today,” he said. He added that while the Browne family eventually found a parish church they were welcomed in, many who arrived from the Caribbean didn’t and ended up leaving the church as a result.”That is a scandal of our own,” he said.

The Windrush generation

The statement from the church specifically mentions the so-called Windrush generation, the first large group of Caribbean migrants to arrive in the United Kingdom after World War II.They were invited by the UK government to come and help rebuild Britain after the devastation of the war. Hundreds of thousands of people came from former British colonies. Until a new immigration law came into force in 1973, Commonwealth citizens and their children had the automatic right to live and work in the UK.When successive British governments adopted a tougher approach to illegal immigration in recent years, descendants of these first immigrants found themselves under scrutiny.The government adopted new laws in 2012 that require employers, landlords and health service providers to demand evidence of legal immigration status.UK government apology to 18 Windrush victims criticized as ‘drop in the ocean’Some descendants of the Windrush generation have struggled to prove their status, because they don’t have these required documents. As a consequence, some lost their jobs, others were evicted from their homes, and a few were reported to have been threatened with deportation.The government was forced to apologize — repeatedly — for their treatment of the Windrush generation and their descendants. Now, the Church of England has followed.”We have damaged the Church, we have damaged the image of God and most of all, we have damaged those we victimized, unconsciously very often,” Welby said.

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One man linked to at least 9 coronavirus cases after traveling from Singapore to France to UK

British man linked to a number of coronavirus cases after traveling from Singapore to a French ski chalet to the UK has fully recovered.The patient, Steve Walsh, is believed to have infected at least nine other people during his stay in the French Alps after contracting the virus in Singapore. He released a statement Tuesday revealing his name and thanking the UK’s National Health Service for its help and care.Walsh had attended a conference at the Grand Hyatt hotel in Singapore in late January, hosted by the gas analysis company Servomex, which has since confirmed that “a limited number of its employees in different countries have been diagnosed with the coronavirus and are now being treated.” Walsh works at Servomex.

UK patient Steve Walsh

UK patient Steve WalshBut the conference appears to have led to a chain of transmission for Walsh,who left Singapore on January 24 to fly to the French Alps, where he spent four days vacationing in a ski chalet in Contamines-Montjoie, southeast France.France on Saturday confirmed five new cases of the virus, all of them British nationals, including one 9-year-old child who had spent time in a school in the resort. The patients were infected after coming into contact with a UK citizen who had traveled from Singapore, according to local health official Jean-Yves Grall.The 1st US evacuee infected with coronavirus was mistakenly released due to CDC and hospital errors, health official saysWalsh left the French ski resort on January 28, taking an EasyJet flight from nearby Geneva, Switzerland to London’s Gatwick airport.Walsh said in his statement Tuesday that he contacted his doctor and health authorities as soon as he knew he had been exposed to a confirmed case of coronavirus. “I was advised to attend an isolated room at hospital, despite showing no symptoms, and subsequently self-isolated at home as instructed. When the diagnosis was confirmed I was sent to an isolation unit in hospital, where I remain, and, as a precaution, my family was also asked to isolate themselves.”Four further patients in England tested positive for coronavirus on Monday, bringing the country’s total tally to eight, the UK Department of Health said in a statement. The new cases are all known contacts of a previously confirmed UK case, and the virus was passed on to them in France, it said.Coronavirus prankster faces five years in jail in RussiaThe agency also declared the virus a “serious and imminent threat to public health,” which gives officials authority to impose quarantine restrictions on people who “could present a risk of infecting or contaminating others.”Some media have suggested that Walsh may be a “super-spreader” of the virus, meaning a single patient who transmits the infection to many other people, but experts urge caution.University of Edinburgh infectious disease expert Mark Woolhouse told CNN: “I don’t think it’s helpful to highlight an individual.” That’s because it’s not clear how many people he actually infected, whether he “sheds” the virus more readily than any other person, or whether he was simply in contact with more people and thus, more likely to pass the virus on. Woolhouse prefers the term “super spreading event.”World Health Organization (WHO) Executive Director Dr. Michael J Ryan called on the media not to personalize the disease, while answering a question about Walsh on Tuesday.Ryan dismissed reports that Walsh was a “super spreader,” saying the circumstances around his case were “unfortunate” but “by no means a massive super spreading event.”This is life under coronavirus quarantine on a cruise ship, military base, in a hotel or at homeAs fears over the transmission of coronavirus grow, WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said on Monday: “In recent days, we have seen some concerning instances of onward transmission from people with no travel history to China, like the cases reported in France yesterday and the United Kingdom today. The detection of this small number of cases could be the spark that becomes a bigger fire. But for now, it’s only a spark. Our objective remains containment.”EasyJet said it was notified by British health authorities about an infected passenger on board, but that as of Monday there had been no other confirmed cases from that flight, nor had any passengers shown symptoms.French authorities have “managed to contact and trace all people who were in contact with the British tourists who were in the village,” health minister Agnes Buzyn told French CNN affiliate BFM. The ski center plans to remain open, according to Etienne Jacquet, the mayor of Contamines-Montjoie.The Grand Hyatt in Singapore, meanwhile, said no one who contracted the virus showed symptoms while at the luxury hotel, and none of its staff has tested positive. When it learned of cases originating on its property the hotel said it immediately started taking the temperature of its guests, and its staff twice a day. It has also brought in an outside government agency to sanitize and “deep clean” affected public areas and guestrooms.

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Coronavirus prankster faces five years in jail in Russia

oncerns grow over the global spread of the coronavirus, Russian authorities have arrested a prankster for imitating symptoms of the virus and collapsing on a metro train as a joke.Footage shared online shows a young man wearing a face mask on the Moscow metro suddenly falling to the floor and convulsing while his friends shout to commuters in the busy carriage that he has the coronavirus. Other passengers panic and move away from the man.China is struggling to get back to work after the coronavirus lockdownRussian state news agency TASS reports that the suspect, named as Karomatullo Dzhaborov, was detained on February 8 by police on suspicion of hooliganism. The crime carries a maximum sentence of five years in prison in Russia.The video was posted on social media accounts called kara.prank on February 2. It has since been removed from YouTube and Instagram but can still be viewed on a Telegram channel.Russia’s Interior Ministry said the police have also identified two of his alleged accomplices and have placed them under an order not to leave the Russian capital.Moscow’s Cheryomushkinsky court ordered Dzhaborov, a citizen of Tajikistan, be held in a pre-trial detention center until March 8.The suspect’s lawyer Alexei Popov told TASS his client orchestrated the prank to raise awareness about the disease and that he will appeal the court’s decision to arrest his client.

Karomatullo Dzhaborov attends a bail hearing in connection with the video showing a coronavirus prank on the Moscow metro.

Karomatullo Dzhaborov attends a bail hearing in connection with the video showing a coronavirus prank on the Moscow metro.”This video should not be viewed separately from his other videos. They shot videos in stores asking people if they were aware of the coronavirus,” Popov said. “They shot videos in pharmacies which were selling masks at inflated prices. They wanted to draw the attention of the authorities to the problem, there is no evidence of a crime.”First US evacuee infected with coronavirus was mistakenly released from hospital and returned to quarantineRussia has taken stringent measures to curb the spread of the coronavirus. It has a particularly high exposure to China where the disease originated, including a vast land border that is now closed but for a few tightly controlled corridors.Russia also attracts approximately 1.9 million Chinese tourists a year. But tour groups have now been canceled, and incoming flights are curtailed to a single terminal in Moscow’s Sheremetyevo airport where passengers are screened before being admitted.Two coronavirus cases were identified in Russia’s Far East on January 31. Both cases involved Chinese citizens who were taken to hospital for treatment.

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Russian ex-prison official shoots himself dead in court after being found guilty

n service official Viktor Sviridov.

Moscow (CNN)A former Russian prison service official died by suicide in a Moscow court on Wednesday after he was sentenced to three years in jail, Russian state news agency TASS reported.Moments after the judge found him guilty, Viktor Sviridov, the former chief of Russia’s federal penitentiary service’s motor transport department, took out a pistol and shot himself.”After the guilty verdict was handed down, Sviridov committed suicide. He died on the spot,” the emergency services told TASS.

An ambulance at Moscow's Chertanovsky District Court, where Viktor Sviridov died by suicide.

An ambulance at Moscow’s Chertanovsky District Court, where Viktor Sviridov died by suicide.Sviridov had been convicted of extorting 10 million rubles ($158,500) by Moscow’s Chertanovsky Court.Sviridov’s lawyer, Alexander Kotelnitsky, told TASS that his client had stage four cancer, but did not appear to be in a depressed mood when he went into court Wednesday morning.Sviridov had been under travel restrictions since his indictment.Authorities are investigating how Sviridov was able to carry a weapon into the courtroom, the court press service said. TASS reported that the metal detectors in the court were in good, working condition.CNN has reached out to the court for comment.

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This is where Wuhan coronavirus cases have been confirmed worldwide

 Wuhan coronavirus has spread throughout the world since the first cases were detected in central China in December. At least 1,100 people have died and more than 45,000 people have been infected, and the World Health Organization (WHO) has declared the outbreak a public health emergency of international concern.China’s National Health Commission has confirmed the virus can be transmitted from person to person through “droplet transmission” — where a virus is passed on due to an infected person sneezing or coughing — as well as by direct contact.There at least 510 confirmed cases of Wuhan coronavirus in more than 25 countries and territories outside mainland China. Two people have died outside of mainland China from the virus — a 44-year-old Chinese man in the Philippines, and a 39-year-old man in Hong Kong.A number of countries, such as the United States and Japan, have evacuated their nationals on flights from Wuhan, capital of Hubei province.This is a full list of places outside mainland China with confirmed cases of the Wuhan coronavirus.

Australia (at least 15 cases)

The Australian state of Queensland confirmed its fifth case of Wuhan coronavirus on Tuesday, pushing the national total to 15 confirmed cases.The patient, a 37-year-old Chinese woman, is currently isolated at the Gold Coast University Hospital. She is a member of the same tour group as Queensland’s four previously confirmed cases.More than 240 Australians on the repatriation flight from Wuhan, via Qantas, reached the Australian territory of Christmas Island in the Indian Ocean, according to Prime Minister Scott Morrison on Tuesday.A total of 241 Australians were transferred to Christmas Island to be quarantined, while a pregnant woman and her partner were sent to Perth for isolation, according to Morrison’s tweets.Morrison added that the government is also working with Chinese authorities on a second repatriation flight from Wuhan, and the New Zealand government about possibly repatriating its nationals on the same flight.

Belgium (at least 1 case)

Belgium has confirmed its first case of coronavirus, after one of nine repatriates from Wuhan tested positive for the virus, Belgium’s public health department said in a statement on Tuesday.”The person who tested positive is healthy and shows no signs of illness for the time being,” the statement said.”They were transferred last night to St. Peter’s University Hospital in Brussels, one of our country’s two reference centres. This hospital has all the necessary expertise and support to ensure the best possible care.”

Cambodia (at least 1 case)

Cambodia reported its first case of Wuhan coronavirus on Monday — a 60-year-old Chinese man who flew into the country from Wuhan with three family members. They tested negative for the virus, according to a Ministry of Information statement. The man’s condition was stable and he only showed mild symptoms, it said.

Canada (at least 7 cases)

Seven cases of 2019 novel coronavirus have been confirmed in Canada, according to government figures.Three of the cases are in Ontario, with four cases in British Columbia.The Canadian government has warned its citizens against all travel to Hubei province. It said the risk of the new coronavirus spreading within Canada remained low.

Finland (at least 1 case)

Finland has one case of coronavirus. The patient, a 32-year-old woman from Wuhan, arrived in the country on January 23, traveling the same day to a village in the northern Lapland region, according to CNN affiliate MTV3 Finland.She developed respiratory symptoms and fever on Sunday and went to the emergency room on Tuesday, MTV3 Finland reports.

France (at least 11 cases)

Five new cases of coronavirus have been confirmed in France, health minister Agnes Buzyn, said at a news conference on Saturday. This raises the number of cases in France to 11.All of the five new cases are British nationals — four adults and one child.”None of them are in serious condition,” Buzyn said.France’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs has advised against all non-essential travel to the whole territory of mainland China over the coronavirus epidemic.The status of Hubei province, the epicenter of the novel coronavirus is “highly not recommended” by the ministry.

Germany (at least 16 cases)

Two additional people have tested positive for the novel coronavirus in the German state of Bavaria, a spokesman for the state health ministry said in a statement on Tuesday.The two new patients bring the total number of confirmed cases to 14 for the state of Bavaria, and 16 for Germany overall.According to the Bavarian health ministry, the two new cases are related to a company from the district of Starnberg, where most of the previously known cases were also employed.

Hong Kong (at least 50 cases, 1 death)

Health officials in Hong Kong have confirmed an additional case of the novel coronavirus, bringing the citywide total to 50.Speaking at a news conference on Wednesday, Dr Chuang Shuk-kwan of the Center for Health protection said the additional case involves a 51-year-old man who developed a fever on February 3 before being hospitalized on February 10. The patient is a colleague of the 37th confirmed case in the city, according to Chuang.Hong Kong has reported one death from the coronavirus — a 39-year-old man who died on February 4 and had an underlying illness. The patient took the high-speed train from Hong Kong to Wuhan on January 21 and returned to the city from Changshanan on January 23. He was said to have never visited any health care facilities, wet market or seafood market, or had any exposure to wild animals during the incubation period.Hong Kong has temporarily closed some of its borders with China and stopped issuing travel permits to mainland tourists.West Kowloon Station, where high-speed rail runs between the city and mainland China, is closed until further notice. Half of all incoming flights from China have been canceled. Residents of Hubei province, where the virus was first reported, are also being denied entry to the city.Most government offices, except those involved in emergency and essential services, will be closed for the rest of the week. All schools will also be shut until at least March 2.This comes as Hong Kong recalls painful memories from the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) outbreak in 2003, a pandemic that killed more than 280 people in the city.

People queue for free face masks outside a cosmetics shop at Tsuen Wan in Hong Kong on January 28, 2020.

People queue for free face masks outside a cosmetics shop at Tsuen Wan in Hong Kong on January 28, 2020.

India (at least 3 cases)

India confirmed its third case of coronavirus on Monday in Kerala.The third case is a student who tested positive for the virus after returning from Wuhan, according to a Facebook post from Kerala Health Minister KK Shailaja. The student has been admitted to a district hospital in Kerala and is in stable condition.

The construction of a new hospital continues in Wuhan on Sunday, February 2.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakThe construction of a new hospital continues in Wuhan on Sunday, February 2.Hide Caption33 of 64

Medical workers move a coronavirus patient into an isolation ward at the Second People's Hospital in Fuyang, China, on Saturday, February 1.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakMedical workers move a coronavirus patient into an isolation ward at the Second People’s Hospital in Fuyang, China, on Saturday, February 1.Hide Caption34 of 64

Children wear plastic bottles as makeshift masks while waiting to check in to a flight at the Beijing Capital Airport on Thursday, January 30.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakChildren wear plastic bottles as makeshift masks while waiting to check in to a flight at the Beijing Capital Airport on Thursday, January 30.Hide Caption35 of 64

Passengers in Hong Kong wear protective masks as they wait to board a train at Lo Wu Station, near the mainland border, on January 30.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakPassengers in Hong Kong wear protective masks as they wait to board a train at Lo Wu Station, near the mainland border, on January 30.Hide Caption36 of 64

A volunteer wearing protective clothing disinfects a street in Qingdao, China, on Wednesday, January 29.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakA volunteer wearing protective clothing disinfects a street in Qingdao, China, on Wednesday, January 29.Hide Caption37 of 64

Nanning residents line up to buy face masks from a medical appliance store on January 29.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakNanning residents line up to buy face masks from a medical appliance store on January 29.Hide Caption38 of 64

Lyu Jun, left, a member of a medical team leaving for Wuhan, says goodbye to a loved one in Urumqi, China, on Tuesday, January 28.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakLyu Jun, left, a member of a medical team leaving for Wuhan, says goodbye to a loved one in Urumqi, China, on Tuesday, January 28.Hide Caption39 of 64

A charter flight from Wuhan arrives at an airport in Anchorage, Alaska, on January 28. The US government chartered the plane to bring home US citizens and diplomats from the American consulate in Wuhan.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakA charter flight from Wuhan arrives at an airport in Anchorage, Alaska, on January 28. The US government chartered the plane to bring home US citizens and diplomats from the American consulate in Wuhan.Hide Caption40 of 64

South Korean President Moon Jae-in wears a mask to inspect the National Medical Center in Seoul on January 28.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakSouth Korean President Moon Jae-in wears a mask to inspect the National Medical Center in Seoul on January 28.Hide Caption41 of 64

Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam, center, attends a news conference in Hong Kong on January 28. Lam said China will stop individual travelers to Hong Kong while closing some border checkpoints and restricting flights and train services from the mainland.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakHong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam, center, attends a news conference in Hong Kong on January 28. Lam said China will stop individual travelers to Hong Kong while closing some border checkpoints and restricting flights and train services from the mainland.Hide Caption42 of 64

Workers at an airport in Novosibirsk, Russia, check the temperatures of passengers who arrived from Beijing on January 28.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakWorkers at an airport in Novosibirsk, Russia, check the temperatures of passengers who arrived from Beijing on January 28.Hide Caption43 of 64

Alex Azar, the US Secretary of Health and Human Services, speaks during a news conference about the American public-health response.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakAlex Azar, the US Secretary of Health and Human Services, speaks during a news conference about the American public-health response.Hide Caption44 of 64

Two residents walk in an empty park in Wuhan on Monday, January 27. The city remained on lockdown for a fourth day.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakTwo residents walk in an empty park in Wuhan on Monday, January 27. The city remained on lockdown for a fourth day.Hide Caption45 of 64

Medical staff members bring a patient to the Wuhan Red Cross Hospital on Saturday, January 25.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakMedical staff members bring a patient to the Wuhan Red Cross Hospital on Saturday, January 25.Hide Caption46 of 64

A person wears a protective mask, goggles and coat as he stands in a nearly empty street in Beijing on Sunday, January 26.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakA person wears a protective mask, goggles and coat as he stands in a nearly empty street in Beijing on Sunday, January 26.Hide Caption47 of 64

People wear protective masks as they walk under Lunar New Year decorations in Beijing on January 25.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakPeople wear protective masks as they walk under Lunar New Year decorations in Beijing on January 25.Hide Caption48 of 64

Construction workers in Wuhan begin to work on a special hospital to deal with the outbreak on Friday, January 24.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakConstruction workers in Wuhan begin to work on a special hospital to deal with the outbreak on Friday, January 24.Hide Caption49 of 64

Dr. Allison Arwady, commissioner of the Chicago Department of Public Health, speaks to reporters on January 24 about <a href="https://www.cnn.com/2020/01/24/health/wuhan-coronavirus-chicago-cdc/index.html" target="_blank">a patient in Chicago</a> who had been diagnosed with the coronavirus. The patient was the second in the United States to be diagnosed with the illness.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakDr. Allison Arwady, commissioner of the Chicago Department of Public Health, speaks to reporters on January 24 about a patient in Chicago who had been diagnosed with the coronavirus. The patient was the second in the United States to be diagnosed with the illness.Hide Caption50 of 64

A couple kisses goodbye as they travel for the Lunar New Year holiday in Beijing on January 24.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakA couple kisses goodbye as they travel for the Lunar New Year holiday in Beijing on January 24.Hide Caption51 of 64

Workers manufacture protective face masks at a factory in China's Hubei Province on Thursday, January 23.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakWorkers manufacture protective face masks at a factory in China’s Hubei Province on Thursday, January 23.Hide Caption52 of 64

Shoppers wear masks in a Wuhan market on January 23.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakShoppers wear masks in a Wuhan market on January 23.Hide Caption53 of 64

Passengers are checked by a thermography device at an airport in Osaka, Japan, on January 23.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakPassengers are checked by a thermography device at an airport in Osaka, Japan, on January 23.Hide Caption54 of 64

People wear masks while shopping for vegetables in Wuhan on January 23.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakPeople wear masks while shopping for vegetables in Wuhan on January 23.Hide Caption55 of 64

A militia member checks the body temperature of a driver in Wuhan on January 23.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakA militia member checks the body temperature of a driver in Wuhan on January 23.Hide Caption56 of 64

Passengers wear masks as they arrive at the Ninoy Aquino International Airport in Manila, Philippines, on January 23.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakPassengers wear masks as they arrive at the Ninoy Aquino International Airport in Manila, Philippines, on January 23.Hide Caption57 of 64

A customer holds boxes of particulate respirators at a pharmacy in Hong Kong on January 23.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakA customer holds boxes of particulate respirators at a pharmacy in Hong Kong on January 23.Hide Caption58 of 64

Passengers wear masks at the high-speed train station in Hong Kong on January 23.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakPassengers wear masks at the high-speed train station in Hong Kong on January 23.Hide Caption59 of 64

A woman rides an electric bicycle in Wuhan on Wednesday, January 22.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakA woman rides an electric bicycle in Wuhan on Wednesday, January 22.Hide Caption60 of 64

People in Guangzhou, China, wear protective masks on January 22.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakPeople in Guangzhou, China, wear protective masks on January 22.Hide Caption61 of 64

People go through a checkpoint in Guangzhou on January 22.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakPeople go through a checkpoint in Guangzhou on January 22.Hide Caption62 of 64

Medical staff of Wuhan's Union Hospital attend a gathering on January 22.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakMedical staff of Wuhan’s Union Hospital attend a gathering on January 22.Hide Caption63 of 64

Health officials hold a news conference in Beijing on January 22.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakHealth officials hold a news conference in Beijing on January 22.Hide Caption64 of 64

A supermarket worker checks the temperature of a customer in Beijing on Tuesday, February 11.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakA supermarket worker checks the temperature of a customer in Beijing on Tuesday, February 11.Hide Caption1 of 64

The Deneway branch of the County Oak Medical Centre is closed amid coronavirus fears in Brighton, England, on February 11. Several locations in and around Brighton were quarantined after <a href="https://www.cnn.com/2020/02/11/europe/steve-walsh-uk-coronavirus-patient-intl-gbr/index.html" target="_blank">a man linked to several coronavirus cases in the United Kingdom</a> came into contact with health-care workers and members of the public.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakThe Deneway branch of the County Oak Medical Centre is closed amid coronavirus fears in Brighton, England, on February 11. Several locations in and around Brighton were quarantined after a man linked to several coronavirus cases in the United Kingdom came into contact with health-care workers and members of the public.Hide Caption2 of 64

A police officer, left, wears protective gear as he guards a cordon at the Cheung Hong Estate in Hong Kong on February 11. More than 100 people evacuated the housing block after four residents in two different apartments tested positive for the coronavirus.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakA police officer, left, wears protective gear as he guards a cordon at the Cheung Hong Estate in Hong Kong on February 11. More than 100 people evacuated the housing block after four residents in two different apartments tested positive for the coronavirus.Hide Caption3 of 64

A worker wears a protective suit as he waits to screen people entering an office building in Beijing on Monday, February 10. China's workforce is <a href="https://edition.cnn.com/2020/02/10/business/china-companies-return-to-work-coronavirus/index.html" target="_blank">slowly coming back to work</a> after the coronavirus outbreak forced many parts of the country to extend the Lunar New Year holiday by more than a week.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakA worker wears a protective suit as he waits to screen people entering an office building in Beijing on Monday, February 10. China’s workforce is slowly coming back to work after the coronavirus outbreak forced many parts of the country to extend the Lunar New Year holiday by more than a week.Hide Caption4 of 64

Chinese President Xi Jinping has his temperature checked during an appearance in Beijing on February 10.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakChinese President Xi Jinping has his temperature checked during an appearance in Beijing on February 10.Hide Caption5 of 64

Photojournalists wearing face masks take photos of a bus carrying passengers after they disembarked from the World Dream cruise ship in Hong Kong on Sunday, February 9. <a href="https://www.cnn.com/2020/02/05/asia/coronavirus-cruise-quarantines-intl-hnk/index.html" target="_blank">More than 5,300 people were quarantined on two cruise ships</a> off Hong Kong and Japan amid concerns passengers and crew were inadvertently exposed to the coronavirus.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakPhotojournalists wearing face masks take photos of a bus carrying passengers after they disembarked from the World Dream cruise ship in Hong Kong on Sunday, February 9. More than 5,300 people were quarantined on two cruise ships off Hong Kong and Japan amid concerns passengers and crew were inadvertently exposed to the coronavirus.Hide Caption6 of 64

People participating in a Lunar New Year Parade in New York City hold signs reading, "Wuhan stay strong!" on February 9.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakPeople participating in a Lunar New Year Parade in New York City hold signs reading, “Wuhan stay strong!” on February 9.Hide Caption7 of 64

A shopper walks past empty shelves at a grocery store in Hong Kong on February 9. China's Ministry of Commerce <a href="https://www.cnn.com/2020/02/06/asia/wuhan-coronavirus-update-intl-hnk/index.html" target="_blank">encouraged supermarkets and grocery stores</a> to resume operations as the country's voluntary or mandatory quarantines began to take an economic toll.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakA shopper walks past empty shelves at a grocery store in Hong Kong on February 9. China’s Ministry of Commerce encouraged supermarkets and grocery stores to resume operations as the country’s voluntary or mandatory quarantines began to take an economic toll.Hide Caption8 of 64

A worker wearing a protective suit uses a machine to disinfect a business establishment in Shanghai, China, on February 9.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakA worker wearing a protective suit uses a machine to disinfect a business establishment in Shanghai, China, on February 9.Hide Caption9 of 64

Workers in protective gear walk near the Diamond Princess cruise ship docked in Yokohama, Japan, on Friday, February 7.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakWorkers in protective gear walk near the Diamond Princess cruise ship docked in Yokohama, Japan, on Friday, February 7.Hide Caption10 of 64

People in Hong Kong attend a vigil February 7 for <a href="https://edition.cnn.com/2020/02/07/asia/china-doctor-death-censorship-intl-hnk/index.html" target="_blank">whistleblower doctor Li Wenliang. </a>Li, 34, died in Wuhan after contracting the virus while treating a patient.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakPeople in Hong Kong attend a vigil February 7 for whistleblower doctor Li Wenliang. Li, 34, died in Wuhan after contracting the virus while treating a patient.Hide Caption11 of 64

A woman grieves while paying tribute to Li at Li's hospital in Wuhan on February 7.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakA woman grieves while paying tribute to Li at Li’s hospital in Wuhan on February 7.Hide Caption12 of 64

The Anthem of the Seas cruise ship is seen docked at the Cape Liberty Cruise Port in Bayonne, New Jersey, on February 7. Passengers were to be screened for coronavirus as a precaution, an official with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention told CNN.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakThe Anthem of the Seas cruise ship is seen docked at the Cape Liberty Cruise Port in Bayonne, New Jersey, on February 7. Passengers were to be screened for coronavirus as a precaution, an official with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention told CNN.Hide Caption13 of 64

A light installation is displayed by striking members of the Hospital Authority Employees Alliance and other activists at the Hospital Authority building in Hong Kong on February 7.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakA light installation is displayed by striking members of the Hospital Authority Employees Alliance and other activists at the Hospital Authority building in Hong Kong on February 7.Hide Caption14 of 64

Passengers are seen on the deck of the Diamond Princess cruise ship, docked at the Yokohama Port on February 7.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakPassengers are seen on the deck of the Diamond Princess cruise ship, docked at the Yokohama Port on February 7.Hide Caption15 of 64

Flight attendants wearing face masks make their way through Don Mueang Airport in Bangkok, Thailand, on February 7.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakFlight attendants wearing face masks make their way through Don Mueang Airport in Bangkok, Thailand, on February 7.Hide Caption16 of 64

Workers check sterile medical gloves at a latex-product manufacturer in Nanjing, China, on Thursday, February 6.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakWorkers check sterile medical gloves at a latex-product manufacturer in Nanjing, China, on Thursday, February 6.Hide Caption17 of 64

A woman wears a protective mask as she shops in a Beijing market on February 6.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakA woman wears a protective mask as she shops in a Beijing market on February 6.Hide Caption18 of 64

This aerial photo shows the Leishenshan Hospital that is being built in Wuhan, China, to handle coronavirus patients.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakThis aerial photo shows the Leishenshan Hospital that is being built in Wuhan, China, to handle coronavirus patients.Hide Caption19 of 64

A passenger shows a note from the World Dream cruise ship docked at the Kai Tak cruise terminal in Hong Kong on Friday, February 5.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakA passenger shows a note from the World Dream cruise ship docked at the Kai Tak cruise terminal in Hong Kong on Friday, February 5.Hide Caption20 of 64

A mask is seen on a statue in Beijing on February 5.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakA mask is seen on a statue in Beijing on February 5.Hide Caption21 of 64

An ambulance stops at a traffic light in front of the Grand Lisboa Hotel in Macao. The virus turned China's gambling mecca <a href="https://www.cnn.com/2020/02/03/asia/china-virus-macao-gambling-intl-hnk/index.html" target="_blank">into a ghost town.</a>

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakAn ambulance stops at a traffic light in front of the Grand Lisboa Hotel in Macao. The virus turned China’s gambling mecca into a ghost town.Hide Caption22 of 64

A dog in Beijing wears a makeshift mask constructed from a paper cup.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakA dog in Beijing wears a makeshift mask constructed from a paper cup.Hide Caption23 of 64

Workers prepare beds at a Wuhan exhibition center that was converted into a makeshift hospital for coronavirus cases.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakWorkers prepare beds at a Wuhan exhibition center that was converted into a makeshift hospital for coronavirus cases.Hide Caption24 of 64

Striking hospital workers in Hong Kong demand the closure of the border with mainland China on Thursday, February 4.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakStriking hospital workers in Hong Kong demand the closure of the border with mainland China on Thursday, February 4.Hide Caption25 of 64

The Diamond Princess cruise ship sits anchored in quarantine off the port of Yokohama, Japan, on February 4. It arrived a day earlier with passengers feeling ill.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakThe Diamond Princess cruise ship sits anchored in quarantine off the port of Yokohama, Japan, on February 4. It arrived a day earlier with passengers feeling ill.Hide Caption26 of 64

A medical worker wearing protective gear waits to take the temperature of people entering Princess Margaret Hospital in Hong Kong on February 4.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakA medical worker wearing protective gear waits to take the temperature of people entering Princess Margaret Hospital in Hong Kong on February 4.Hide Caption27 of 64

Medical workers in protective suits help transfer patients to a newly completed field hospital in Wuhan.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakMedical workers in protective suits help transfer patients to a newly completed field hospital in Wuhan.Hide Caption28 of 64

People wearing protective overalls talk outside a Wuhan hotel housing people in isolation on Monday, February 3.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakPeople wearing protective overalls talk outside a Wuhan hotel housing people in isolation on Monday, February 3.Hide Caption29 of 64

A man stands in front of TV screens broadcasting a speech by Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam on February 3. Lam said the city would shut almost all border-control points to the mainland.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakA man stands in front of TV screens broadcasting a speech by Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam on February 3. Lam said the city would shut almost all border-control points to the mainland.Hide Caption30 of 64

A colleague sprays disinfectant on a doctor in Wuhan on February 3.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakA colleague sprays disinfectant on a doctor in Wuhan on February 3.Hide Caption31 of 64

Commuters in Tokyo walk past an electric board displaying dismal stock prices on February 3, the first business day after the Chinese New Year. Asia's markets recorded their <a href="https://www.cnn.com/2020/02/02/investing/china-markets-coronavirus/index.html" target="_blank">worst day in years</a> as investors finally got a chance to react to the worsening coronavirus outbreak.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakCommuters in Tokyo walk past an electric board displaying dismal stock prices on February 3, the first business day after the Chinese New Year. Asia’s markets recorded their worst day in years as investors finally got a chance to react to the worsening coronavirus outbreak.Hide Caption32 of 64

The construction of a new hospital continues in Wuhan on Sunday, February 2.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakThe construction of a new hospital continues in Wuhan on Sunday, February 2.Hide Caption33 of 64

Medical workers move a coronavirus patient into an isolation ward at the Second People's Hospital in Fuyang, China, on Saturday, February 1.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakMedical workers move a coronavirus patient into an isolation ward at the Second People’s Hospital in Fuyang, China, on Saturday, February 1.Hide Caption34 of 64

Children wear plastic bottles as makeshift masks while waiting to check in to a flight at the Beijing Capital Airport on Thursday, January 30.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakChildren wear plastic bottles as makeshift masks while waiting to check in to a flight at the Beijing Capital Airport on Thursday, January 30.Hide Caption35 of 64

Passengers in Hong Kong wear protective masks as they wait to board a train at Lo Wu Station, near the mainland border, on January 30.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakPassengers in Hong Kong wear protective masks as they wait to board a train at Lo Wu Station, near the mainland border, on January 30.Hide Caption36 of 64

A volunteer wearing protective clothing disinfects a street in Qingdao, China, on Wednesday, January 29.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakA volunteer wearing protective clothing disinfects a street in Qingdao, China, on Wednesday, January 29.Hide Caption37 of 64

Nanning residents line up to buy face masks from a medical appliance store on January 29.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakNanning residents line up to buy face masks from a medical appliance store on January 29.Hide Caption38 of 64

Lyu Jun, left, a member of a medical team leaving for Wuhan, says goodbye to a loved one in Urumqi, China, on Tuesday, January 28.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakLyu Jun, left, a member of a medical team leaving for Wuhan, says goodbye to a loved one in Urumqi, China, on Tuesday, January 28.Hide Caption39 of 64

A charter flight from Wuhan arrives at an airport in Anchorage, Alaska, on January 28. The US government chartered the plane to bring home US citizens and diplomats from the American consulate in Wuhan.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakA charter flight from Wuhan arrives at an airport in Anchorage, Alaska, on January 28. The US government chartered the plane to bring home US citizens and diplomats from the American consulate in Wuhan.Hide Caption40 of 64

South Korean President Moon Jae-in wears a mask to inspect the National Medical Center in Seoul on January 28.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakSouth Korean President Moon Jae-in wears a mask to inspect the National Medical Center in Seoul on January 28.Hide Caption41 of 64

Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam, center, attends a news conference in Hong Kong on January 28. Lam said China will stop individual travelers to Hong Kong while closing some border checkpoints and restricting flights and train services from the mainland.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakHong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam, center, attends a news conference in Hong Kong on January 28. Lam said China will stop individual travelers to Hong Kong while closing some border checkpoints and restricting flights and train services from the mainland.Hide Caption42 of 64

Workers at an airport in Novosibirsk, Russia, check the temperatures of passengers who arrived from Beijing on January 28.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakWorkers at an airport in Novosibirsk, Russia, check the temperatures of passengers who arrived from Beijing on January 28.Hide Caption43 of 64

Alex Azar, the US Secretary of Health and Human Services, speaks during a news conference about the American public-health response.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakAlex Azar, the US Secretary of Health and Human Services, speaks during a news conference about the American public-health response.Hide Caption44 of 64

Two residents walk in an empty park in Wuhan on Monday, January 27. The city remained on lockdown for a fourth day.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakTwo residents walk in an empty park in Wuhan on Monday, January 27. The city remained on lockdown for a fourth day.Hide Caption45 of 64

Medical staff members bring a patient to the Wuhan Red Cross Hospital on Saturday, January 25.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakMedical staff members bring a patient to the Wuhan Red Cross Hospital on Saturday, January 25.Hide Caption46 of 64

A person wears a protective mask, goggles and coat as he stands in a nearly empty street in Beijing on Sunday, January 26.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakA person wears a protective mask, goggles and coat as he stands in a nearly empty street in Beijing on Sunday, January 26.Hide Caption47 of 64

People wear protective masks as they walk under Lunar New Year decorations in Beijing on January 25.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakPeople wear protective masks as they walk under Lunar New Year decorations in Beijing on January 25.Hide Caption48 of 64

Construction workers in Wuhan begin to work on a special hospital to deal with the outbreak on Friday, January 24.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakConstruction workers in Wuhan begin to work on a special hospital to deal with the outbreak on Friday, January 24.Hide Caption49 of 64

Dr. Allison Arwady, commissioner of the Chicago Department of Public Health, speaks to reporters on January 24 about <a href="https://www.cnn.com/2020/01/24/health/wuhan-coronavirus-chicago-cdc/index.html" target="_blank">a patient in Chicago</a> who had been diagnosed with the coronavirus. The patient was the second in the United States to be diagnosed with the illness.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakDr. Allison Arwady, commissioner of the Chicago Department of Public Health, speaks to reporters on January 24 about a patient in Chicago who had been diagnosed with the coronavirus. The patient was the second in the United States to be diagnosed with the illness.Hide Caption50 of 64

A couple kisses goodbye as they travel for the Lunar New Year holiday in Beijing on January 24.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakA couple kisses goodbye as they travel for the Lunar New Year holiday in Beijing on January 24.Hide Caption51 of 64

Workers manufacture protective face masks at a factory in China's Hubei Province on Thursday, January 23.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakWorkers manufacture protective face masks at a factory in China’s Hubei Province on Thursday, January 23.Hide Caption52 of 64

Shoppers wear masks in a Wuhan market on January 23.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakShoppers wear masks in a Wuhan market on January 23.Hide Caption53 of 64

Passengers are checked by a thermography device at an airport in Osaka, Japan, on January 23.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakPassengers are checked by a thermography device at an airport in Osaka, Japan, on January 23.Hide Caption54 of 64

People wear masks while shopping for vegetables in Wuhan on January 23.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakPeople wear masks while shopping for vegetables in Wuhan on January 23.Hide Caption55 of 64

A militia member checks the body temperature of a driver in Wuhan on January 23.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakA militia member checks the body temperature of a driver in Wuhan on January 23.Hide Caption56 of 64

Passengers wear masks as they arrive at the Ninoy Aquino International Airport in Manila, Philippines, on January 23.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakPassengers wear masks as they arrive at the Ninoy Aquino International Airport in Manila, Philippines, on January 23.Hide Caption57 of 64

A customer holds boxes of particulate respirators at a pharmacy in Hong Kong on January 23.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakA customer holds boxes of particulate respirators at a pharmacy in Hong Kong on January 23.Hide Caption58 of 64

Passengers wear masks at the high-speed train station in Hong Kong on January 23.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakPassengers wear masks at the high-speed train station in Hong Kong on January 23.Hide Caption59 of 64

A woman rides an electric bicycle in Wuhan on Wednesday, January 22.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakA woman rides an electric bicycle in Wuhan on Wednesday, January 22.Hide Caption60 of 64

People in Guangzhou, China, wear protective masks on January 22.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakPeople in Guangzhou, China, wear protective masks on January 22.Hide Caption61 of 64

People go through a checkpoint in Guangzhou on January 22.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakPeople go through a checkpoint in Guangzhou on January 22.Hide Caption62 of 64

Medical staff of Wuhan's Union Hospital attend a gathering on January 22.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakMedical staff of Wuhan’s Union Hospital attend a gathering on January 22.Hide Caption63 of 64

Health officials hold a news conference in Beijing on January 22.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakHealth officials hold a news conference in Beijing on January 22.Hide Caption64 of 64

A supermarket worker checks the temperature of a customer in Beijing on Tuesday, February 11.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakA supermarket worker checks the temperature of a customer in Beijing on Tuesday, February 11.Hide Caption1 of 64

The Deneway branch of the County Oak Medical Centre is closed amid coronavirus fears in Brighton, England, on February 11. Several locations in and around Brighton were quarantined after <a href="https://www.cnn.com/2020/02/11/europe/steve-walsh-uk-coronavirus-patient-intl-gbr/index.html" target="_blank">a man linked to several coronavirus cases in the United Kingdom</a> came into contact with health-care workers and members of the public.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakThe Deneway branch of the County Oak Medical Centre is closed amid coronavirus fears in Brighton, England, on February 11. Several locations in and around Brighton were quarantined after a man linked to several coronavirus cases in the United Kingdom came into contact with health-care workers and members of the public.Hide Caption2 of 64

A police officer, left, wears protective gear as he guards a cordon at the Cheung Hong Estate in Hong Kong on February 11. More than 100 people evacuated the housing block after four residents in two different apartments tested positive for the coronavirus.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakA police officer, left, wears protective gear as he guards a cordon at the Cheung Hong Estate in Hong Kong on February 11. More than 100 people evacuated the housing block after four residents in two different apartments tested positive for the coronavirus.Hide Caption3 of 64

A worker wears a protective suit as he waits to screen people entering an office building in Beijing on Monday, February 10. China's workforce is <a href="https://edition.cnn.com/2020/02/10/business/china-companies-return-to-work-coronavirus/index.html" target="_blank">slowly coming back to work</a> after the coronavirus outbreak forced many parts of the country to extend the Lunar New Year holiday by more than a week.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakA worker wears a protective suit as he waits to screen people entering an office building in Beijing on Monday, February 10. China’s workforce is slowly coming back to work after the coronavirus outbreak forced many parts of the country to extend the Lunar New Year holiday by more than a week.Hide Caption4 of 64

Chinese President Xi Jinping has his temperature checked during an appearance in Beijing on February 10.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakChinese President Xi Jinping has his temperature checked during an appearance in Beijing on February 10.Hide Caption5 of 64

Photojournalists wearing face masks take photos of a bus carrying passengers after they disembarked from the World Dream cruise ship in Hong Kong on Sunday, February 9. <a href="https://www.cnn.com/2020/02/05/asia/coronavirus-cruise-quarantines-intl-hnk/index.html" target="_blank">More than 5,300 people were quarantined on two cruise ships</a> off Hong Kong and Japan amid concerns passengers and crew were inadvertently exposed to the coronavirus.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakPhotojournalists wearing face masks take photos of a bus carrying passengers after they disembarked from the World Dream cruise ship in Hong Kong on Sunday, February 9. More than 5,300 people were quarantined on two cruise ships off Hong Kong and Japan amid concerns passengers and crew were inadvertently exposed to the coronavirus.Hide Caption6 of 64

People participating in a Lunar New Year Parade in New York City hold signs reading, "Wuhan stay strong!" on February 9.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakPeople participating in a Lunar New Year Parade in New York City hold signs reading, “Wuhan stay strong!” on February 9.Hide Caption7 of 64

A shopper walks past empty shelves at a grocery store in Hong Kong on February 9. China's Ministry of Commerce <a href="https://www.cnn.com/2020/02/06/asia/wuhan-coronavirus-update-intl-hnk/index.html" target="_blank">encouraged supermarkets and grocery stores</a> to resume operations as the country's voluntary or mandatory quarantines began to take an economic toll.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakA shopper walks past empty shelves at a grocery store in Hong Kong on February 9. China’s Ministry of Commerce encouraged supermarkets and grocery stores to resume operations as the country’s voluntary or mandatory quarantines began to take an economic toll.Hide Caption8 of 64

A worker wearing a protective suit uses a machine to disinfect a business establishment in Shanghai, China, on February 9.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakA worker wearing a protective suit uses a machine to disinfect a business establishment in Shanghai, China, on February 9.Hide Caption9 of 64

Workers in protective gear walk near the Diamond Princess cruise ship docked in Yokohama, Japan, on Friday, February 7.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakWorkers in protective gear walk near the Diamond Princess cruise ship docked in Yokohama, Japan, on Friday, February 7.Hide Caption10 of 64

People in Hong Kong attend a vigil February 7 for <a href="https://edition.cnn.com/2020/02/07/asia/china-doctor-death-censorship-intl-hnk/index.html" target="_blank">whistleblower doctor Li Wenliang. </a>Li, 34, died in Wuhan after contracting the virus while treating a patient.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakPeople in Hong Kong attend a vigil February 7 for whistleblower doctor Li Wenliang. Li, 34, died in Wuhan after contracting the virus while treating a patient.Hide Caption11 of 64

A woman grieves while paying tribute to Li at Li's hospital in Wuhan on February 7.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakA woman grieves while paying tribute to Li at Li’s hospital in Wuhan on February 7.Hide Caption12 of 64

The Anthem of the Seas cruise ship is seen docked at the Cape Liberty Cruise Port in Bayonne, New Jersey, on February 7. Passengers were to be screened for coronavirus as a precaution, an official with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention told CNN.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakThe Anthem of the Seas cruise ship is seen docked at the Cape Liberty Cruise Port in Bayonne, New Jersey, on February 7. Passengers were to be screened for coronavirus as a precaution, an official with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention told CNN.Hide Caption13 of 64

A light installation is displayed by striking members of the Hospital Authority Employees Alliance and other activists at the Hospital Authority building in Hong Kong on February 7.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakA light installation is displayed by striking members of the Hospital Authority Employees Alliance and other activists at the Hospital Authority building in Hong Kong on February 7.Hide Caption14 of 64

Passengers are seen on the deck of the Diamond Princess cruise ship, docked at the Yokohama Port on February 7.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakPassengers are seen on the deck of the Diamond Princess cruise ship, docked at the Yokohama Port on February 7.Hide Caption15 of 64

Flight attendants wearing face masks make their way through Don Mueang Airport in Bangkok, Thailand, on February 7.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakFlight attendants wearing face masks make their way through Don Mueang Airport in Bangkok, Thailand, on February 7.Hide Caption16 of 64

Workers check sterile medical gloves at a latex-product manufacturer in Nanjing, China, on Thursday, February 6.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakWorkers check sterile medical gloves at a latex-product manufacturer in Nanjing, China, on Thursday, February 6.Hide Caption17 of 64

A woman wears a protective mask as she shops in a Beijing market on February 6.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakA woman wears a protective mask as she shops in a Beijing market on February 6.Hide Caption18 of 64

This aerial photo shows the Leishenshan Hospital that is being built in Wuhan, China, to handle coronavirus patients.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakThis aerial photo shows the Leishenshan Hospital that is being built in Wuhan, China, to handle coronavirus patients.Hide Caption19 of 64

A passenger shows a note from the World Dream cruise ship docked at the Kai Tak cruise terminal in Hong Kong on Friday, February 5.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakA passenger shows a note from the World Dream cruise ship docked at the Kai Tak cruise terminal in Hong Kong on Friday, February 5.Hide Caption20 of 64

A mask is seen on a statue in Beijing on February 5.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakA mask is seen on a statue in Beijing on February 5.Hide Caption21 of 64

An ambulance stops at a traffic light in front of the Grand Lisboa Hotel in Macao. The virus turned China's gambling mecca <a href="https://www.cnn.com/2020/02/03/asia/china-virus-macao-gambling-intl-hnk/index.html" target="_blank">into a ghost town.</a>

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakAn ambulance stops at a traffic light in front of the Grand Lisboa Hotel in Macao. The virus turned China’s gambling mecca into a ghost town.Hide Caption22 of 64

A dog in Beijing wears a makeshift mask constructed from a paper cup.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakA dog in Beijing wears a makeshift mask constructed from a paper cup.Hide Caption23 of 64

Workers prepare beds at a Wuhan exhibition center that was converted into a makeshift hospital for coronavirus cases.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakWorkers prepare beds at a Wuhan exhibition center that was converted into a makeshift hospital for coronavirus cases.Hide Caption24 of 64

Striking hospital workers in Hong Kong demand the closure of the border with mainland China on Thursday, February 4.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakStriking hospital workers in Hong Kong demand the closure of the border with mainland China on Thursday, February 4.Hide Caption25 of 64

The Diamond Princess cruise ship sits anchored in quarantine off the port of Yokohama, Japan, on February 4. It arrived a day earlier with passengers feeling ill.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakThe Diamond Princess cruise ship sits anchored in quarantine off the port of Yokohama, Japan, on February 4. It arrived a day earlier with passengers feeling ill.Hide Caption26 of 64

A medical worker wearing protective gear waits to take the temperature of people entering Princess Margaret Hospital in Hong Kong on February 4.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakA medical worker wearing protective gear waits to take the temperature of people entering Princess Margaret Hospital in Hong Kong on February 4.Hide Caption27 of 64

Medical workers in protective suits help transfer patients to a newly completed field hospital in Wuhan.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakMedical workers in protective suits help transfer patients to a newly completed field hospital in Wuhan.Hide Caption28 of 64

People wearing protective overalls talk outside a Wuhan hotel housing people in isolation on Monday, February 3.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakPeople wearing protective overalls talk outside a Wuhan hotel housing people in isolation on Monday, February 3.Hide Caption29 of 64

A man stands in front of TV screens broadcasting a speech by Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam on February 3. Lam said the city would shut almost all border-control points to the mainland.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakA man stands in front of TV screens broadcasting a speech by Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam on February 3. Lam said the city would shut almost all border-control points to the mainland.Hide Caption30 of 64

A colleague sprays disinfectant on a doctor in Wuhan on February 3.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakA colleague sprays disinfectant on a doctor in Wuhan on February 3.Hide Caption31 of 64

Commuters in Tokyo walk past an electric board displaying dismal stock prices on February 3, the first business day after the Chinese New Year. Asia's markets recorded their <a href="https://www.cnn.com/2020/02/02/investing/china-markets-coronavirus/index.html" target="_blank">worst day in years</a> as investors finally got a chance to react to the worsening coronavirus outbreak.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakCommuters in Tokyo walk past an electric board displaying dismal stock prices on February 3, the first business day after the Chinese New Year. Asia’s markets recorded their worst day in years as investors finally got a chance to react to the worsening coronavirus outbreak.Hide Caption32 of 64

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Italy (at least 3 cases)

Italy has confirmed its third case of coronavirus, after an Italian national tested positive for the infection, the country’s health ministry said in a statement on Thursday.The patient is the first Italian to contract the virus, following two cases of Chinese tourists with the infection.According to the statement, the patient was quarantined in the city of Cecchignola, on the outskirts of Rome, after being repatriated from Wuhan last week.

Japan (at least 28 cases, plus 175 cruise ship cases)

There are 40 newly discovered cases of coronavirus onboard the Diamond Princess cruise ship docked at Yokohama port, which includes one quarantine officer, Japanese health minister Katsunobu Kato told reporters on Wednesday.This brings the total number of cases from the ship to 175.Kato said that there were 39 new cases, but also one “quarantine officer,” who came aboard the ship to help with the quarantine, who has tested positive.Not including the cruise ship, Japan has confirmed 28 other casesof coronavirus in total.The two latest cases are a man in his 50s and a man in 40s, both of whom came back on charter flights from China. Both had initially tested negative, the health ministry said, but developed a fever at home and were subsequently tested again.

Macao (at least 10 cases)

Macao has confirmed at least 10 cases of the Wuhan coronavirus.A total of 41 entertainment operations in the semiautonomous Chinese city have been suspended for 15 days starting tonight, according to the government.The operations include casinos, betting branches, theaters, cinemas, game centers, internet cafes, discos, bars, nightclubs and dance halls.The outbreak has had a devastating impact on tourism in the gambling enclave, which relies heavily on mainland Chinese visitors. Gambling is illegal on the mainland and Lunar New Year is usually a particularly busy time for Macao’s casinos. But not this year — tourism to the city has dropped 73.6% year-on-year, the Macao government announced on January 29.

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Boris Johnson is spoiling for a fight

may have only left the European Union last Friday, but its next opportunity to stagger blindly off a cliff is just 20 weeks away.The current Brexit transition period is due to expire on December 31. Between now and then, both the UK and Brussels hope to reach an agreement on their future relationship. Failure to do so would mean no formal agreement and the immediate cessation of all current arrangements, causing untold chaos and disruption.And while the transition period can be extended, the UK needs to decide whether it wishes to do so before July 1. That, according to international law, really is the point of no return and potentially the new economic cliff edge. Boris Johnson has said that he has absolutely no intention of extending.Given that it took nearly four years to reach an agreement with Brussels that avoided the first cliff edge, you’d think this might be cause for alarm in London.

Pro-Brexit supporters wave placards at Parliament Square as people prepare for Brexit on January 31.

Pro-Brexit supporters wave placards at Parliament Square as people prepare for Brexit on January 31.However, since Brexit Day, Westminster has been eerily quiet on the single most important issue facing the United Kingdom in 2020.Johnson’s Conservatives are swaggering around with the confidence you might expect of a government that recently won a landslide victory in the most important general election of a generation. Gone are the days of deadlock; Johnson’s government is now free to pursue whatever agenda it likes in this post-EU reality.

Locking horns

Right now, what it seems to like doing most is picking fights.In the past week alone, Downing Street tried to play divide and rule with the British press, excluding some reporters from news outlets deemed to be critical of its policies from government briefings — including those given by impartial civil servants.It also announced plans that pave the way to removing the BBC’s public funding model. Johnson’s government has been locking horns with the BBC virtually since he came to power over the summer, and many in his inner team believe that the national broadcaster has an anti-Brexit, anti-Johnson bias.

Boris Johnson's government is locking horns with the publicly funded BBC.

Boris Johnson’s government is locking horns with the publicly funded BBC.And he’s setting himself up to have a nasty screaming match with human rights lawyers later this month. Johnson’s government is putting forward controversial legislation that would change how and when people convicted of terror offenses are released from prison. It’s possible that these plans are illegal under human rights law.The question is, why is a PM with such a huge task ahead of him so willfully poking so many hornets’ nests? “This government obviously likes conflict. I don’t think they are particularly bothered by people seeing them as being at war with the BBC or in conflict with judges over keeping suspected terrorists in prison via retrospective legislation. And if it serves as a distraction from the government’s Brexit strategy, so much the better,” says Anand Menon, director of the UK in a changing EU think tank.Whether it’s a deliberate distraction strategy or not, Boris Johnson’s government is becoming defined by its propensity for combat. Civil servants who had served previous administrations complain that Johnson’s political advisers are “arrogant,” “overly confident” and deliberately creating an “us versus them culture.”

As it happened: The day the UK left the EU

As it happened: The day the UK left the EU 01:49However, many of these civil servants are not seeing much beyond the bluster. Despite having the mandate to pursue whatever agenda it likes, Johnson’s government seems fixated on telling people how much they want to change the country without doing all that much about it.Which somewhat lends weight to the theory that Johnson’s government is eager that the national conversation be on any subject other than Brexit. And that could be down to the fact that the UK’s current Brexit strategy appears to be sitting tight, not saying very much and letting the clock run down. And many are worried that this is because the government’s real strategy is to leave at the end of this year with no formal future relationship in place.”The government is existing day-to-day at the moment … I think with all things added up, it’s becoming very likely we are going to leave on December 31 without a deal,” says Chris Bryant, an opposition Labour Party lawmaker.Earlier in the week Johnson talked about the UK’s future relationship with Europe being like Australia’s. Phil Hogan, the EU’s trade commissioner, quickly pointed out that Australia has no formal trading relationship with the EU, and that he believed it was code for “no deal.” When asked for its response to Hogan’s comments, the government told CNN that Australia has several bilateral agreements with the EU, and that it already has a deal with the EU — the deal that it left last Friday.

Despite the noisy protests on Brexit Day on January 31, there is little effective opposition to the government in Westminster at the moment.

Despite the noisy protests on Brexit Day on January 31, there is little effective opposition to the government in Westminster at the moment.

Gloom in Westminster

There is also little scrutiny of the government’s Brexit policy at the moment. When general elections are called, Parliament is dissolved. This means that parliamentary committees that exist to scrutinize the government are gone and not reelected until Parliament is up and running again. That process can take months and it largely at the mercy of the government. “The problem with an election is it takes Parliament out of action for about four months in terms of total scrutiny,” explains Bryant.The opposition Labour Party is not doing a great job of holding Johnson to account. This isn’t a huge surprise, seeing as it’s currently electing a new leader. However, the result of this contest will not come until April 4, by which time official talks with the EU will have started and that July 1 deadline will be just 89 days away.The Labour Party was instrumental in forcing Johnson to extend the previous Brexit deadline. It also frustrated Johnson by not allowing him to hold an election until no deal had been taken officially off the table. However, on Wednesday at the weekly session of Prime Minister’s Questions, Labour’s leader, Jeremy Corbyn, didn’t raise Johnson’s recent shift to an Australia deal or the fact that the EU’s top trade official claims it is cover for no deal.Lawmakers in Johnson’s own Conservative party who are not in the inner circle are equally despondent at their inability to affect the government’s position on Brexit. They say with a resigned shrug that Johnson doesn’t need them any more.Whoever you talk to, the biggest concern is that Johnson is going to spend the next year playing to his Euroskeptic base. They fear he will talk up the hardest deal possible. It might be economic folly, but so what?

Here's what you need to know about Brexit

Here’s what you need to know about Brexit 03:38Despite the gloominess in some corners of Westminster, the mood in Brussels is calm. “We’ve been doing this for three years now. We are not surprised by political developments in Westminster. All that matters is what happens when we get in the room,” one EU official told CNN.EU diplomats share this view. They accept that Johnson’s government wants a harder Brexit than they are happy about, but ultimately are aware that it’s the UK who faces the more daunting cliff edge at the end of this year. And many in Brussels are quick to note that cliff edges have previously worked to bring the Brits closer to Brussels when the crunch comes.The only real unknown in all of this is what Johnson ultimately wants. He has frequently stated he wants a free trade deal that causes minimum disruption while being able to diverge from the EU on rules. He is happy to tell the EU that the UK will maintain high standards on things like foods, but he is less keen to commit to anything in writing. This could become a sticking point as the clock runs down.Despite the relatively short period of time for all this to get done, it’s worth noting that the UK starts from a position of full alignment with the EU and that Brussels isn’t hellbent on punishing the UK for leaving. There is goodwill on both sides — at the moment — and there is very clearly a deal waiting to be done.The problem, as with all things Brexit, is politics. Johnson is thought by many to have buckled in Brussels to get Brexit done. He just about sold it to his own party, with some enormous caveats. If he tries to do it again, he might not find his Conservative party so supportive. However, if he does play hard and do a deal that harms the British economy, he could equally find that the voters who handed him a majority are turned off.Boris Johnson upended British politics in December. He won the most important election in recent history, delivered Brexit and is

currently walking on air. However, he has to make some enormous choices in the coming weeks and, far from getting it done, he is going to discover that Brexit will continue to dominate his career and define his political legacy. He’d do well to remember that when deciding what’s best for the country. After all, despite the noise, it’s only what he thinks and says that really matters now.

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Sinn Fein surged in Ireland’s election. Here’s why that’s so controversial

utsiders Sinn Fein stole the show in Ireland’s general election over the weekend.With all the votes finally counted, the scale of the left-wing, Irish nationalist party’s surge is clear — breaking a century of dominance by establishment heavyweight parties (Fine Gael and Fianna Fail) and changing the political landscape of Ireland, likely forever.Here’s what you need to know.

Is it correct to say that Sinn Fein won the election?

Sinn Fein won the popular poll, pulling in 24.5% of first-choice votes. But the party were pipped at the post by Fianna Fail, who netted 38 Teachta Dala (or members of parliament), to Sinn Fein’s 37, thus making them the largest party by number of seats. Had Sinn Fein fielded more candidates in some constituencies they would likely have emerged the outright winner.

Could Sinn Fein form a government?

Technically Sinn Fein could form a government. There are a number of paths to this, none are easy and some are very improbable. One would be a coalition with Fianna Fail and some independent lawmakers, but there is little political crossover and much animosity. Sinn Fein President Mary Lou McDonald has talked about an alliance of left-leaning parties. To pull that off without Fianna Fail, she would need the backing of most, if not all, of the smaller parties and the independents to hold a majority. There are 160 seats in the Dail, 73 of those are taken by Fianna Fail and Fine Gael, and the path to a sustainable and successful government is challenging. Fine Gael, meanwhile, have rejected any alliance with Sinn Fein.

Does that mean Ireland could get its first woman Taoiseach?

It’s not impossible, but at this stage it’s unlikely. As the final votes were being counted, Sinn Fein seemed to float the idea of a rotating premiership. No details were available on how that could work or who would be involved in the rotation. One potential dampener on McDonald becoming the first woman Taoiseach is Fianna Fail’s Michael Martin — this election is perhaps his last chance to be Ireland’s leader and he is unlikely to let that ambition die easily.

Why is Sinn Fein so controversial?

Sinn Fein appeared to have pulled off a major rebranding, seemingly burying their past as a party long accused of aligning with terrorism and violence.Sinn Fein, although they repeatedly denied it, were the political wing of the IRA (the Irish Republican Army), who fought a bloody three-decade military campaign to throw the British out of Northern Ireland and unite the island of Ireland.

What were “The Troubles?”

The violence was known in an oddly understated way as “The Troubles,” yet more than 3,500 people died and many more had their lives irrevocably changed.The IRA was at the forefront of the conflict — killing, bombing, shooting and intimidating their way to influence. They had grown out of a demand for equality in Northern Ireland’s deeply bigoted society that often gave advantages to Protestants over Catholics.As one of Sinn Fein’s early politicians said — they would rise through the Armalite [gun] and the ballot paper.

How has Sinn Fein rebranded itself and is it really a different party?

The moment Northern Ireland’s Good Friday Agreement was signed in 1998, Sinn Fein President Gerry Adams pivoted south of the border rather than take a plum job in the north. He has always denied he was an IRA commander and saw that the political path to his years-long struggle for a united Ireland ran through Dublin. He has shaped the party accordingly, bringing in younger, less tainted politicians and leaders.Two years ago, Adams stepped back as party president and did not run in this election after serving as a TD (or member of parliament) in Dublin for almost a decade.The party surged through its grassroots activism around issues that captured voters’ attention — housing, homelessness and healthcare — and their demands for change matured alongside a generation that never witnessed their violent roots. Even so, one of their first elected TDs this weekend was a former IRA member, whose supporters sang rebel songs at the count center to celebrate his success. Meanwhile in Waterford, Sinn Fein’s David Cullinane, newly elected on a mountain of first preference votes defended his acceptance speech support of the IRA as a comment on “the past not the future.” Non-Sinn Fein voters may be troubled to see that McDonald appeared to defend Cullinane’s comments as a “distraction” from the important work of forming a government.

Are Sinn Fein’s gains likely to have an impact on Brexit talks?

Absolutely. Sinn Fein are now the only Irish party with major political influence both north and south of the Irish border, the European Union’s new land border with the United Kingdom. Such is the seismic shift in Irish politics that Sinn Fein’s demand for a united Ireland will be heard louder.This will drive up growing Unionist fears in Northern Ireland, so whether he likes it or not, UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s Brexit considerations will have to deal with this reality. Perhaps more directly, an Irish government with ardently pro-united Ireland Sinn Fein inside of it, or even in strong opposition to it, could stiffen the EU’s resolve on negotiations and therefore limit potential concessions to the British.This story has been updated.

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Britain finally admits that Brexit means the death of frictionless trade with Europe

idea that Britain can leave the European Union and maintain frictionless trade with the bloc of 27 countries is officially dead.Cabinet minister Michael Gove warned UK businesses on Monday that the government will subject goods from the European Union to border controls starting at the end of this year, acknowledging the end of frictionless trade with the country’s biggest export market.Brexit just happened. Britain and the EU are already arguing about what comes next“The UK will be outside the [EU] single market and outside the customs union, so we will have to be ready for the customs procedures and regulatory checks that will inevitably follow,” Gove said during a speech.Frictionless trade, which allows goods to move between countries without facing tariffs or border checks, is a key feature of the European Union. Brexit supporters had claimed that Britain could maintain the arrangement, or something close to it, even outside the bloc.But that dream was predicated on the advent of new technology that would allow trucks to whiz though virtual border checks at speed, or misplaced hopes that the European Union would grant privileges to the United Kingdom that are reserved for members of the bloc.Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s decision to diverge from EU rules and regulations and not seek a tight economic relationship with the bloc after Brexit was the final nail in the coffin of continued frictionless trade.”The moment the government’s position became ‘we just want a free trade agreement’ it meant that the UK was advocating increased trade and border friction between the UK and EU,” Sam Lowe, a senior research fellow at The Centre for European Reform, said on Twitter.

Commercial trucks arrive and leave the port of Dover.

Commercial trucks arrive and leave the port of Dover.Gove made clear Monday that businesses should prepare for import controls on goods moving between the United Kingdom and the European Union when the Brexit transition period ends on December 31. Traders will be required submit customs declarations, Gove said, and shipments could be stopped for inspection.The border checks could mean delays and more red tape for UK businesses, and foreign companies doing business in Britain, that have suffered from nearly four years of uncertainty over Brexit. The UK economy didn’t grow at all during the final three months of last year, according to data published Tuesday, and business investment has stalled since the June 2016 referendum.It has long been the position of the UK government that it would leave the EU single market and customs union following Brexit, but British officials have been less forthcoming about the costs to business that would follow.Former Prime Minister Theresa May, for example, attempted to negotiate a deal with Brussels that would maintain “as frictionless as possible” trade while taking her country out of the European Union.Trump ‘tore into’ Boris Johnson over Huawei in phone call, source saysJohnson signed a political declaration with the European Union last fall that called for arrangements that “will create a free trade area, combining deep regulatory and customs cooperation, underpinned by provisions ensuring a level playing field for open and fair competition.”Now, the limitations of such arrangements have been made clear.”We are naturally disappointed that the promise of frictionless trade has been replaced with a promise that trade will be as seamless as possible,” Elizabeth de Jong, UK policy director at the Freight Transport Association, said in a statement.The biggest crunch point is expected to be the English Channel crossing between Dover and the French town of Calais. The port of Dover handled 2.5 million trucks in 2018 and another 1.7 million passed through the nearby Eurotunnel under the channel.Companies must now prepare themselves for new barriers that will be erected in less than 11 months if the UK government sticks to its pledge not to request an extension of the transition period from Brussels. De Jong said that government should now help business.”It is encouraging for industry that [Gove] said he does not underestimate what needs to be done and that he has his civil servants focused on capturing and providing industry with the details we need, we hope within the timeframes we need to prepare,” she said.

Michael Gove arrives for a meeting of the cabinet at 10 Downing Street.

Michael Gove arrives for a meeting of the cabinet at 10 Downing Street.Michel Barnier, chief Brexit negotiator for the European Union, said last month that friction at the border would increase as a natural result of choices made by the UK government. Checks will be needed on food products and live animals, for example, to ensure they meet EU standards.”The UK has chosen to become a third country,” he said during a speech. “It has chosen to create two regulatory spaces. This makes frictionless trade impossible. It makes checks indispensable.”

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This is where Wuhan coronavirus cases have been confirmed worldwide

ng (CNN)The Wuhan coronavirus has spread throughout the world since the first cases were detected in central China in December. At least 1,100 people have died and more than 45,000 people have been infected, and the World Health Organization (WHO) has declared the outbreak a public health emergency of international concern.China’s National Health Commission has confirmed the virus can be transmitted from person to person through “droplet transmission” — where a virus is passed on due to an infected person sneezing or coughing — as well as by direct contact.There at least 510 confirmed cases of Wuhan coronavirus in more than 25 countries and territories outside mainland China. Two people have died outside of mainland China from the virus — a 44-year-old Chinese man in the Philippines, and a 39-year-old man in Hong Kong.A number of countries, such as the United States and Japan, have evacuated their nationals on flights from Wuhan, capital of Hubei province.This is a full list of places outside mainland China with confirmed cases of the Wuhan coronavirus.

Australia (at least 15 cases)

The Australian state of Queensland confirmed its fifth case of Wuhan coronavirus on Tuesday, pushing the national total to 15 confirmed cases.The patient, a 37-year-old Chinese woman, is currently isolated at the Gold Coast University Hospital. She is a member of the same tour group as Queensland’s four previously confirmed cases.More than 240 Australians on the repatriation flight from Wuhan, via Qantas, reached the Australian territory of Christmas Island in the Indian Ocean, according to Prime Minister Scott Morrison on Tuesday.A total of 241 Australians were transferred to Christmas Island to be quarantined, while a pregnant woman and her partner were sent to Perth for isolation, according to Morrison’s tweets.Morrison added that the government is also working with Chinese authorities on a second repatriation flight from Wuhan, and the New Zealand government about possibly repatriating its nationals on the same flight.

Belgium (at least 1 case)

Belgium has confirmed its first case of coronavirus, after one of nine repatriates from Wuhan tested positive for the virus, Belgium’s public health department said in a statement on Tuesday.”The person who tested positive is healthy and shows no signs of illness for the time being,” the statement said.”They were transferred last night to St. Peter’s University Hospital in Brussels, one of our country’s two reference centres. This hospital has all the necessary expertise and support to ensure the best possible care.”

Cambodia (at least 1 case)

Cambodia reported its first case of Wuhan coronavirus on Monday — a 60-year-old Chinese man who flew into the country from Wuhan with three family members. They tested negative for the virus, according to a Ministry of Information statement. The man’s condition was stable and he only showed mild symptoms, it said.

Canada (at least 7 cases)

Seven cases of 2019 novel coronavirus have been confirmed in Canada, according to government figures.Three of the cases are in Ontario, with four cases in British Columbia.The Canadian government has warned its citizens against all travel to Hubei province. It said the risk of the new coronavirus spreading within Canada remained low.

Finland (at least 1 case)

Finland has one case of coronavirus. The patient, a 32-year-old woman from Wuhan, arrived in the country on January 23, traveling the same day to a village in the northern Lapland region, according to CNN affiliate MTV3 Finland.She developed respiratory symptoms and fever on Sunday and went to the emergency room on Tuesday, MTV3 Finland reports.

France (at least 11 cases)

Five new cases of coronavirus have been confirmed in France, health minister Agnes Buzyn, said at a news conference on Saturday. This raises the number of cases in France to 11.All of the five new cases are British nationals — four adults and one child.”None of them are in serious condition,” Buzyn said.France’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs has advised against all non-essential travel to the whole territory of mainland China over the coronavirus epidemic.The status of Hubei province, the epicenter of the novel coronavirus is “highly not recommended” by the ministry.

Germany (at least 16 cases)

Two additional people have tested positive for the novel coronavirus in the German state of Bavaria, a spokesman for the state health ministry said in a statement on Tuesday.The two new patients bring the total number of confirmed cases to 14 for the state of Bavaria, and 16 for Germany overall.According to the Bavarian health ministry, the two new cases are related to a company from the district of Starnberg, where most of the previously known cases were also employed.

Hong Kong (at least 50 cases, 1 death)

Health officials in Hong Kong have confirmed an additional case of the novel coronavirus, bringing the citywide total to 50.Speaking at a news conference on Wednesday, Dr Chuang Shuk-kwan of the Center for Health protection said the additional case involves a 51-year-old man who developed a fever on February 3 before being hospitalized on February 10. The patient is a colleague of the 37th confirmed case in the city, according to Chuang.Hong Kong has reported one death from the coronavirus — a 39-year-old man who died on February 4 and had an underlying illness. The patient took the high-speed train from Hong Kong to Wuhan on January 21 and returned to the city from Changshanan on January 23. He was said to have never visited any health care facilities, wet market or seafood market, or had any exposure to wild animals during the incubation period.Hong Kong has temporarily closed some of its borders with China and stopped issuing travel permits to mainland tourists.West Kowloon Station, where high-speed rail runs between the city and mainland China, is closed until further notice. Half of all incoming flights from China have been canceled. Residents of Hubei province, where the virus was first reported, are also being denied entry to the city.Most government offices, except those involved in emergency and essential services, will be closed for the rest of the week. All schools will also be shut until at least March 2.This comes as Hong Kong recalls painful memories from the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) outbreak in 2003, a pandemic that killed more than 280 people in the city.

People queue for free face masks outside a cosmetics shop at Tsuen Wan in Hong Kong on January 28, 2020.

People queue for free face masks outside a cosmetics shop at Tsuen Wan in Hong Kong on January 28, 2020.

India (at least 3 cases)

India confirmed its third case of coronavirus on Monday in Kerala.The third case is a student who tested positive for the virus after returning from Wuhan, according to a Facebook post from Kerala Health Minister KK Shailaja. The student has been admitted to a district hospital in Kerala and is in stable condition.

The construction of a new hospital continues in Wuhan on Sunday, February 2.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakThe construction of a new hospital continues in Wuhan on Sunday, February 2.Hide Caption33 of 64

Medical workers move a coronavirus patient into an isolation ward at the Second People's Hospital in Fuyang, China, on Saturday, February 1.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakMedical workers move a coronavirus patient into an isolation ward at the Second People’s Hospital in Fuyang, China, on Saturday, February 1.Hide Caption34 of 64

Children wear plastic bottles as makeshift masks while waiting to check in to a flight at the Beijing Capital Airport on Thursday, January 30.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakChildren wear plastic bottles as makeshift masks while waiting to check in to a flight at the Beijing Capital Airport on Thursday, January 30.Hide Caption35 of 64

Passengers in Hong Kong wear protective masks as they wait to board a train at Lo Wu Station, near the mainland border, on January 30.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakPassengers in Hong Kong wear protective masks as they wait to board a train at Lo Wu Station, near the mainland border, on January 30.Hide Caption36 of 64

A volunteer wearing protective clothing disinfects a street in Qingdao, China, on Wednesday, January 29.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakA volunteer wearing protective clothing disinfects a street in Qingdao, China, on Wednesday, January 29.Hide Caption37 of 64

Nanning residents line up to buy face masks from a medical appliance store on January 29.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakNanning residents line up to buy face masks from a medical appliance store on January 29.Hide Caption38 of 64

Lyu Jun, left, a member of a medical team leaving for Wuhan, says goodbye to a loved one in Urumqi, China, on Tuesday, January 28.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakLyu Jun, left, a member of a medical team leaving for Wuhan, says goodbye to a loved one in Urumqi, China, on Tuesday, January 28.Hide Caption39 of 64

A charter flight from Wuhan arrives at an airport in Anchorage, Alaska, on January 28. The US government chartered the plane to bring home US citizens and diplomats from the American consulate in Wuhan.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakA charter flight from Wuhan arrives at an airport in Anchorage, Alaska, on January 28. The US government chartered the plane to bring home US citizens and diplomats from the American consulate in Wuhan.Hide Caption40 of 64

South Korean President Moon Jae-in wears a mask to inspect the National Medical Center in Seoul on January 28.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakSouth Korean President Moon Jae-in wears a mask to inspect the National Medical Center in Seoul on January 28.Hide Caption41 of 64

Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam, center, attends a news conference in Hong Kong on January 28. Lam said China will stop individual travelers to Hong Kong while closing some border checkpoints and restricting flights and train services from the mainland.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakHong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam, center, attends a news conference in Hong Kong on January 28. Lam said China will stop individual travelers to Hong Kong while closing some border checkpoints and restricting flights and train services from the mainland.Hide Caption42 of 64

Workers at an airport in Novosibirsk, Russia, check the temperatures of passengers who arrived from Beijing on January 28.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakWorkers at an airport in Novosibirsk, Russia, check the temperatures of passengers who arrived from Beijing on January 28.Hide Caption43 of 64

Alex Azar, the US Secretary of Health and Human Services, speaks during a news conference about the American public-health response.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakAlex Azar, the US Secretary of Health and Human Services, speaks during a news conference about the American public-health response.Hide Caption44 of 64

Two residents walk in an empty park in Wuhan on Monday, January 27. The city remained on lockdown for a fourth day.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakTwo residents walk in an empty park in Wuhan on Monday, January 27. The city remained on lockdown for a fourth day.Hide Caption45 of 64

Medical staff members bring a patient to the Wuhan Red Cross Hospital on Saturday, January 25.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakMedical staff members bring a patient to the Wuhan Red Cross Hospital on Saturday, January 25.Hide Caption46 of 64

A person wears a protective mask, goggles and coat as he stands in a nearly empty street in Beijing on Sunday, January 26.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakA person wears a protective mask, goggles and coat as he stands in a nearly empty street in Beijing on Sunday, January 26.Hide Caption47 of 64

People wear protective masks as they walk under Lunar New Year decorations in Beijing on January 25.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakPeople wear protective masks as they walk under Lunar New Year decorations in Beijing on January 25.Hide Caption48 of 64

Construction workers in Wuhan begin to work on a special hospital to deal with the outbreak on Friday, January 24.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakConstruction workers in Wuhan begin to work on a special hospital to deal with the outbreak on Friday, January 24.Hide Caption49 of 64

Dr. Allison Arwady, commissioner of the Chicago Department of Public Health, speaks to reporters on January 24 about <a href="https://www.cnn.com/2020/01/24/health/wuhan-coronavirus-chicago-cdc/index.html" target="_blank">a patient in Chicago</a> who had been diagnosed with the coronavirus. The patient was the second in the United States to be diagnosed with the illness.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakDr. Allison Arwady, commissioner of the Chicago Department of Public Health, speaks to reporters on January 24 about a patient in Chicago who had been diagnosed with the coronavirus. The patient was the second in the United States to be diagnosed with the illness.Hide Caption50 of 64

A couple kisses goodbye as they travel for the Lunar New Year holiday in Beijing on January 24.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakA couple kisses goodbye as they travel for the Lunar New Year holiday in Beijing on January 24.Hide Caption51 of 64

Workers manufacture protective face masks at a factory in China's Hubei Province on Thursday, January 23.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakWorkers manufacture protective face masks at a factory in China’s Hubei Province on Thursday, January 23.Hide Caption52 of 64

Shoppers wear masks in a Wuhan market on January 23.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakShoppers wear masks in a Wuhan market on January 23.Hide Caption53 of 64

Passengers are checked by a thermography device at an airport in Osaka, Japan, on January 23.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakPassengers are checked by a thermography device at an airport in Osaka, Japan, on January 23.Hide Caption54 of 64

People wear masks while shopping for vegetables in Wuhan on January 23.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakPeople wear masks while shopping for vegetables in Wuhan on January 23.Hide Caption55 of 64

A militia member checks the body temperature of a driver in Wuhan on January 23.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakA militia member checks the body temperature of a driver in Wuhan on January 23.Hide Caption56 of 64

Passengers wear masks as they arrive at the Ninoy Aquino International Airport in Manila, Philippines, on January 23.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakPassengers wear masks as they arrive at the Ninoy Aquino International Airport in Manila, Philippines, on January 23.Hide Caption57 of 64

A customer holds boxes of particulate respirators at a pharmacy in Hong Kong on January 23.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakA customer holds boxes of particulate respirators at a pharmacy in Hong Kong on January 23.Hide Caption58 of 64

Passengers wear masks at the high-speed train station in Hong Kong on January 23.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakPassengers wear masks at the high-speed train station in Hong Kong on January 23.Hide Caption59 of 64

A woman rides an electric bicycle in Wuhan on Wednesday, January 22.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakA woman rides an electric bicycle in Wuhan on Wednesday, January 22.Hide Caption60 of 64

People in Guangzhou, China, wear protective masks on January 22.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakPeople in Guangzhou, China, wear protective masks on January 22.Hide Caption61 of 64

People go through a checkpoint in Guangzhou on January 22.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakPeople go through a checkpoint in Guangzhou on January 22.Hide Caption62 of 64

Medical staff of Wuhan's Union Hospital attend a gathering on January 22.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakMedical staff of Wuhan’s Union Hospital attend a gathering on January 22.Hide Caption63 of 64

Health officials hold a news conference in Beijing on January 22.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakHealth officials hold a news conference in Beijing on January 22.Hide Caption64 of 64

A supermarket worker checks the temperature of a customer in Beijing on Tuesday, February 11.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakA supermarket worker checks the temperature of a customer in Beijing on Tuesday, February 11.Hide Caption1 of 64

The Deneway branch of the County Oak Medical Centre is closed amid coronavirus fears in Brighton, England, on February 11. Several locations in and around Brighton were quarantined after <a href="https://www.cnn.com/2020/02/11/europe/steve-walsh-uk-coronavirus-patient-intl-gbr/index.html" target="_blank">a man linked to several coronavirus cases in the United Kingdom</a> came into contact with health-care workers and members of the public.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakThe Deneway branch of the County Oak Medical Centre is closed amid coronavirus fears in Brighton, England, on February 11. Several locations in and around Brighton were quarantined after a man linked to several coronavirus cases in the United Kingdom came into contact with health-care workers and members of the public.Hide Caption2 of 64

A police officer, left, wears protective gear as he guards a cordon at the Cheung Hong Estate in Hong Kong on February 11. More than 100 people evacuated the housing block after four residents in two different apartments tested positive for the coronavirus.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakA police officer, left, wears protective gear as he guards a cordon at the Cheung Hong Estate in Hong Kong on February 11. More than 100 people evacuated the housing block after four residents in two different apartments tested positive for the coronavirus.Hide Caption3 of 64

A worker wears a protective suit as he waits to screen people entering an office building in Beijing on Monday, February 10. China's workforce is <a href="https://edition.cnn.com/2020/02/10/business/china-companies-return-to-work-coronavirus/index.html" target="_blank">slowly coming back to work</a> after the coronavirus outbreak forced many parts of the country to extend the Lunar New Year holiday by more than a week.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakA worker wears a protective suit as he waits to screen people entering an office building in Beijing on Monday, February 10. China’s workforce is slowly coming back to work after the coronavirus outbreak forced many parts of the country to extend the Lunar New Year holiday by more than a week.Hide Caption4 of 64

Chinese President Xi Jinping has his temperature checked during an appearance in Beijing on February 10.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakChinese President Xi Jinping has his temperature checked during an appearance in Beijing on February 10.Hide Caption5 of 64

Photojournalists wearing face masks take photos of a bus carrying passengers after they disembarked from the World Dream cruise ship in Hong Kong on Sunday, February 9. <a href="https://www.cnn.com/2020/02/05/asia/coronavirus-cruise-quarantines-intl-hnk/index.html" target="_blank">More than 5,300 people were quarantined on two cruise ships</a> off Hong Kong and Japan amid concerns passengers and crew were inadvertently exposed to the coronavirus.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakPhotojournalists wearing face masks take photos of a bus carrying passengers after they disembarked from the World Dream cruise ship in Hong Kong on Sunday, February 9. More than 5,300 people were quarantined on two cruise ships off Hong Kong and Japan amid concerns passengers and crew were inadvertently exposed to the coronavirus.Hide Caption6 of 64

People participating in a Lunar New Year Parade in New York City hold signs reading, "Wuhan stay strong!" on February 9.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakPeople participating in a Lunar New Year Parade in New York City hold signs reading, “Wuhan stay strong!” on February 9.Hide Caption7 of 64

A shopper walks past empty shelves at a grocery store in Hong Kong on February 9. China's Ministry of Commerce <a href="https://www.cnn.com/2020/02/06/asia/wuhan-coronavirus-update-intl-hnk/index.html" target="_blank">encouraged supermarkets and grocery stores</a> to resume operations as the country's voluntary or mandatory quarantines began to take an economic toll.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakA shopper walks past empty shelves at a grocery store in Hong Kong on February 9. China’s Ministry of Commerce encouraged supermarkets and grocery stores to resume operations as the country’s voluntary or mandatory quarantines began to take an economic toll.Hide Caption8 of 64

A worker wearing a protective suit uses a machine to disinfect a business establishment in Shanghai, China, on February 9.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakA worker wearing a protective suit uses a machine to disinfect a business establishment in Shanghai, China, on February 9.Hide Caption9 of 64

Workers in protective gear walk near the Diamond Princess cruise ship docked in Yokohama, Japan, on Friday, February 7.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakWorkers in protective gear walk near the Diamond Princess cruise ship docked in Yokohama, Japan, on Friday, February 7.Hide Caption10 of 64

People in Hong Kong attend a vigil February 7 for <a href="https://edition.cnn.com/2020/02/07/asia/china-doctor-death-censorship-intl-hnk/index.html" target="_blank">whistleblower doctor Li Wenliang. </a>Li, 34, died in Wuhan after contracting the virus while treating a patient.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakPeople in Hong Kong attend a vigil February 7 for whistleblower doctor Li Wenliang. Li, 34, died in Wuhan after contracting the virus while treating a patient.Hide Caption11 of 64

A woman grieves while paying tribute to Li at Li's hospital in Wuhan on February 7.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakA woman grieves while paying tribute to Li at Li’s hospital in Wuhan on February 7.Hide Caption12 of 64

The Anthem of the Seas cruise ship is seen docked at the Cape Liberty Cruise Port in Bayonne, New Jersey, on February 7. Passengers were to be screened for coronavirus as a precaution, an official with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention told CNN.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakThe Anthem of the Seas cruise ship is seen docked at the Cape Liberty Cruise Port in Bayonne, New Jersey, on February 7. Passengers were to be screened for coronavirus as a precaution, an official with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention told CNN.Hide Caption13 of 64

A light installation is displayed by striking members of the Hospital Authority Employees Alliance and other activists at the Hospital Authority building in Hong Kong on February 7.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakA light installation is displayed by striking members of the Hospital Authority Employees Alliance and other activists at the Hospital Authority building in Hong Kong on February 7.Hide Caption14 of 64

Passengers are seen on the deck of the Diamond Princess cruise ship, docked at the Yokohama Port on February 7.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakPassengers are seen on the deck of the Diamond Princess cruise ship, docked at the Yokohama Port on February 7.Hide Caption15 of 64

Flight attendants wearing face masks make their way through Don Mueang Airport in Bangkok, Thailand, on February 7.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakFlight attendants wearing face masks make their way through Don Mueang Airport in Bangkok, Thailand, on February 7.Hide Caption16 of 64

Workers check sterile medical gloves at a latex-product manufacturer in Nanjing, China, on Thursday, February 6.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakWorkers check sterile medical gloves at a latex-product manufacturer in Nanjing, China, on Thursday, February 6.Hide Caption17 of 64

A woman wears a protective mask as she shops in a Beijing market on February 6.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakA woman wears a protective mask as she shops in a Beijing market on February 6.Hide Caption18 of 64

This aerial photo shows the Leishenshan Hospital that is being built in Wuhan, China, to handle coronavirus patients.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakThis aerial photo shows the Leishenshan Hospital that is being built in Wuhan, China, to handle coronavirus patients.Hide Caption19 of 64

A passenger shows a note from the World Dream cruise ship docked at the Kai Tak cruise terminal in Hong Kong on Friday, February 5.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakA passenger shows a note from the World Dream cruise ship docked at the Kai Tak cruise terminal in Hong Kong on Friday, February 5.Hide Caption20 of 64

A mask is seen on a statue in Beijing on February 5.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakA mask is seen on a statue in Beijing on February 5.Hide Caption21 of 64

An ambulance stops at a traffic light in front of the Grand Lisboa Hotel in Macao. The virus turned China's gambling mecca <a href="https://www.cnn.com/2020/02/03/asia/china-virus-macao-gambling-intl-hnk/index.html" target="_blank">into a ghost town.</a>

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakAn ambulance stops at a traffic light in front of the Grand Lisboa Hotel in Macao. The virus turned China’s gambling mecca into a ghost town.Hide Caption22 of 64

A dog in Beijing wears a makeshift mask constructed from a paper cup.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakA dog in Beijing wears a makeshift mask constructed from a paper cup.Hide Caption23 of 64

Workers prepare beds at a Wuhan exhibition center that was converted into a makeshift hospital for coronavirus cases.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakWorkers prepare beds at a Wuhan exhibition center that was converted into a makeshift hospital for coronavirus cases.Hide Caption24 of 64

Striking hospital workers in Hong Kong demand the closure of the border with mainland China on Thursday, February 4.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakStriking hospital workers in Hong Kong demand the closure of the border with mainland China on Thursday, February 4.Hide Caption25 of 64

The Diamond Princess cruise ship sits anchored in quarantine off the port of Yokohama, Japan, on February 4. It arrived a day earlier with passengers feeling ill.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakThe Diamond Princess cruise ship sits anchored in quarantine off the port of Yokohama, Japan, on February 4. It arrived a day earlier with passengers feeling ill.Hide Caption26 of 64

A medical worker wearing protective gear waits to take the temperature of people entering Princess Margaret Hospital in Hong Kong on February 4.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakA medical worker wearing protective gear waits to take the temperature of people entering Princess Margaret Hospital in Hong Kong on February 4.Hide Caption27 of 64

Medical workers in protective suits help transfer patients to a newly completed field hospital in Wuhan.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakMedical workers in protective suits help transfer patients to a newly completed field hospital in Wuhan.Hide Caption28 of 64

People wearing protective overalls talk outside a Wuhan hotel housing people in isolation on Monday, February 3.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakPeople wearing protective overalls talk outside a Wuhan hotel housing people in isolation on Monday, February 3.Hide Caption29 of 64

A man stands in front of TV screens broadcasting a speech by Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam on February 3. Lam said the city would shut almost all border-control points to the mainland.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakA man stands in front of TV screens broadcasting a speech by Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam on February 3. Lam said the city would shut almost all border-control points to the mainland.Hide Caption30 of 64

A colleague sprays disinfectant on a doctor in Wuhan on February 3.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakA colleague sprays disinfectant on a doctor in Wuhan on February 3.Hide Caption31 of 64

Commuters in Tokyo walk past an electric board displaying dismal stock prices on February 3, the first business day after the Chinese New Year. Asia's markets recorded their <a href="https://www.cnn.com/2020/02/02/investing/china-markets-coronavirus/index.html" target="_blank">worst day in years</a> as investors finally got a chance to react to the worsening coronavirus outbreak.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakCommuters in Tokyo walk past an electric board displaying dismal stock prices on February 3, the first business day after the Chinese New Year. Asia’s markets recorded their worst day in years as investors finally got a chance to react to the worsening coronavirus outbreak.Hide Caption32 of 64

The construction of a new hospital continues in Wuhan on Sunday, February 2.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakThe construction of a new hospital continues in Wuhan on Sunday, February 2.Hide Caption33 of 64

Medical workers move a coronavirus patient into an isolation ward at the Second People's Hospital in Fuyang, China, on Saturday, February 1.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakMedical workers move a coronavirus patient into an isolation ward at the Second People’s Hospital in Fuyang, China, on Saturday, February 1.Hide Caption34 of 64

Children wear plastic bottles as makeshift masks while waiting to check in to a flight at the Beijing Capital Airport on Thursday, January 30.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakChildren wear plastic bottles as makeshift masks while waiting to check in to a flight at the Beijing Capital Airport on Thursday, January 30.Hide Caption35 of 64

Passengers in Hong Kong wear protective masks as they wait to board a train at Lo Wu Station, near the mainland border, on January 30.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakPassengers in Hong Kong wear protective masks as they wait to board a train at Lo Wu Station, near the mainland border, on January 30.Hide Caption36 of 64

A volunteer wearing protective clothing disinfects a street in Qingdao, China, on Wednesday, January 29.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakA volunteer wearing protective clothing disinfects a street in Qingdao, China, on Wednesday, January 29.Hide Caption37 of 64

Nanning residents line up to buy face masks from a medical appliance store on January 29.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakNanning residents line up to buy face masks from a medical appliance store on January 29.Hide Caption38 of 64

Lyu Jun, left, a member of a medical team leaving for Wuhan, says goodbye to a loved one in Urumqi, China, on Tuesday, January 28.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakLyu Jun, left, a member of a medical team leaving for Wuhan, says goodbye to a loved one in Urumqi, China, on Tuesday, January 28.Hide Caption39 of 64

A charter flight from Wuhan arrives at an airport in Anchorage, Alaska, on January 28. The US government chartered the plane to bring home US citizens and diplomats from the American consulate in Wuhan.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakA charter flight from Wuhan arrives at an airport in Anchorage, Alaska, on January 28. The US government chartered the plane to bring home US citizens and diplomats from the American consulate in Wuhan.Hide Caption40 of 64

South Korean President Moon Jae-in wears a mask to inspect the National Medical Center in Seoul on January 28.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakSouth Korean President Moon Jae-in wears a mask to inspect the National Medical Center in Seoul on January 28.Hide Caption41 of 64

Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam, center, attends a news conference in Hong Kong on January 28. Lam said China will stop individual travelers to Hong Kong while closing some border checkpoints and restricting flights and train services from the mainland.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakHong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam, center, attends a news conference in Hong Kong on January 28. Lam said China will stop individual travelers to Hong Kong while closing some border checkpoints and restricting flights and train services from the mainland.Hide Caption42 of 64

Workers at an airport in Novosibirsk, Russia, check the temperatures of passengers who arrived from Beijing on January 28.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakWorkers at an airport in Novosibirsk, Russia, check the temperatures of passengers who arrived from Beijing on January 28.Hide Caption43 of 64

Alex Azar, the US Secretary of Health and Human Services, speaks during a news conference about the American public-health response.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakAlex Azar, the US Secretary of Health and Human Services, speaks during a news conference about the American public-health response.Hide Caption44 of 64

Two residents walk in an empty park in Wuhan on Monday, January 27. The city remained on lockdown for a fourth day.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakTwo residents walk in an empty park in Wuhan on Monday, January 27. The city remained on lockdown for a fourth day.Hide Caption45 of 64

Medical staff members bring a patient to the Wuhan Red Cross Hospital on Saturday, January 25.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakMedical staff members bring a patient to the Wuhan Red Cross Hospital on Saturday, January 25.Hide Caption46 of 64

A person wears a protective mask, goggles and coat as he stands in a nearly empty street in Beijing on Sunday, January 26.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakA person wears a protective mask, goggles and coat as he stands in a nearly empty street in Beijing on Sunday, January 26.Hide Caption47 of 64

People wear protective masks as they walk under Lunar New Year decorations in Beijing on January 25.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakPeople wear protective masks as they walk under Lunar New Year decorations in Beijing on January 25.Hide Caption48 of 64

Construction workers in Wuhan begin to work on a special hospital to deal with the outbreak on Friday, January 24.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakConstruction workers in Wuhan begin to work on a special hospital to deal with the outbreak on Friday, January 24.Hide Caption49 of 64

Dr. Allison Arwady, commissioner of the Chicago Department of Public Health, speaks to reporters on January 24 about <a href="https://www.cnn.com/2020/01/24/health/wuhan-coronavirus-chicago-cdc/index.html" target="_blank">a patient in Chicago</a> who had been diagnosed with the coronavirus. The patient was the second in the United States to be diagnosed with the illness.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakDr. Allison Arwady, commissioner of the Chicago Department of Public Health, speaks to reporters on January 24 about a patient in Chicago who had been diagnosed with the coronavirus. The patient was the second in the United States to be diagnosed with the illness.Hide Caption50 of 64

A couple kisses goodbye as they travel for the Lunar New Year holiday in Beijing on January 24.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakA couple kisses goodbye as they travel for the Lunar New Year holiday in Beijing on January 24.Hide Caption51 of 64

Workers manufacture protective face masks at a factory in China's Hubei Province on Thursday, January 23.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakWorkers manufacture protective face masks at a factory in China’s Hubei Province on Thursday, January 23.Hide Caption52 of 64

Shoppers wear masks in a Wuhan market on January 23.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakShoppers wear masks in a Wuhan market on January 23.Hide Caption53 of 64

Passengers are checked by a thermography device at an airport in Osaka, Japan, on January 23.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakPassengers are checked by a thermography device at an airport in Osaka, Japan, on January 23.Hide Caption54 of 64

People wear masks while shopping for vegetables in Wuhan on January 23.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakPeople wear masks while shopping for vegetables in Wuhan on January 23.Hide Caption55 of 64

A militia member checks the body temperature of a driver in Wuhan on January 23.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakA militia member checks the body temperature of a driver in Wuhan on January 23.Hide Caption56 of 64

Passengers wear masks as they arrive at the Ninoy Aquino International Airport in Manila, Philippines, on January 23.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakPassengers wear masks as they arrive at the Ninoy Aquino International Airport in Manila, Philippines, on January 23.Hide Caption57 of 64

A customer holds boxes of particulate respirators at a pharmacy in Hong Kong on January 23.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakA customer holds boxes of particulate respirators at a pharmacy in Hong Kong on January 23.Hide Caption58 of 64

Passengers wear masks at the high-speed train station in Hong Kong on January 23.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakPassengers wear masks at the high-speed train station in Hong Kong on January 23.Hide Caption59 of 64

A woman rides an electric bicycle in Wuhan on Wednesday, January 22.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakA woman rides an electric bicycle in Wuhan on Wednesday, January 22.Hide Caption60 of 64

People in Guangzhou, China, wear protective masks on January 22.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakPeople in Guangzhou, China, wear protective masks on January 22.Hide Caption61 of 64

People go through a checkpoint in Guangzhou on January 22.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakPeople go through a checkpoint in Guangzhou on January 22.Hide Caption62 of 64

Medical staff of Wuhan's Union Hospital attend a gathering on January 22.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakMedical staff of Wuhan’s Union Hospital attend a gathering on January 22.Hide Caption63 of 64

Health officials hold a news conference in Beijing on January 22.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakHealth officials hold a news conference in Beijing on January 22.Hide Caption64 of 64

A supermarket worker checks the temperature of a customer in Beijing on Tuesday, February 11.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakA supermarket worker checks the temperature of a customer in Beijing on Tuesday, February 11.Hide Caption1 of 64

The Deneway branch of the County Oak Medical Centre is closed amid coronavirus fears in Brighton, England, on February 11. Several locations in and around Brighton were quarantined after <a href="https://www.cnn.com/2020/02/11/europe/steve-walsh-uk-coronavirus-patient-intl-gbr/index.html" target="_blank">a man linked to several coronavirus cases in the United Kingdom</a> came into contact with health-care workers and members of the public.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakThe Deneway branch of the County Oak Medical Centre is closed amid coronavirus fears in Brighton, England, on February 11. Several locations in and around Brighton were quarantined after a man linked to several coronavirus cases in the United Kingdom came into contact with health-care workers and members of the public.Hide Caption2 of 64

A police officer, left, wears protective gear as he guards a cordon at the Cheung Hong Estate in Hong Kong on February 11. More than 100 people evacuated the housing block after four residents in two different apartments tested positive for the coronavirus.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakA police officer, left, wears protective gear as he guards a cordon at the Cheung Hong Estate in Hong Kong on February 11. More than 100 people evacuated the housing block after four residents in two different apartments tested positive for the coronavirus.Hide Caption3 of 64

A worker wears a protective suit as he waits to screen people entering an office building in Beijing on Monday, February 10. China's workforce is <a href="https://edition.cnn.com/2020/02/10/business/china-companies-return-to-work-coronavirus/index.html" target="_blank">slowly coming back to work</a> after the coronavirus outbreak forced many parts of the country to extend the Lunar New Year holiday by more than a week.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakA worker wears a protective suit as he waits to screen people entering an office building in Beijing on Monday, February 10. China’s workforce is slowly coming back to work after the coronavirus outbreak forced many parts of the country to extend the Lunar New Year holiday by more than a week.Hide Caption4 of 64

Chinese President Xi Jinping has his temperature checked during an appearance in Beijing on February 10.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakChinese President Xi Jinping has his temperature checked during an appearance in Beijing on February 10.Hide Caption5 of 64

Photojournalists wearing face masks take photos of a bus carrying passengers after they disembarked from the World Dream cruise ship in Hong Kong on Sunday, February 9. <a href="https://www.cnn.com/2020/02/05/asia/coronavirus-cruise-quarantines-intl-hnk/index.html" target="_blank">More than 5,300 people were quarantined on two cruise ships</a> off Hong Kong and Japan amid concerns passengers and crew were inadvertently exposed to the coronavirus.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakPhotojournalists wearing face masks take photos of a bus carrying passengers after they disembarked from the World Dream cruise ship in Hong Kong on Sunday, February 9. More than 5,300 people were quarantined on two cruise ships off Hong Kong and Japan amid concerns passengers and crew were inadvertently exposed to the coronavirus.Hide Caption6 of 64

People participating in a Lunar New Year Parade in New York City hold signs reading, "Wuhan stay strong!" on February 9.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakPeople participating in a Lunar New Year Parade in New York City hold signs reading, “Wuhan stay strong!” on February 9.Hide Caption7 of 64

A shopper walks past empty shelves at a grocery store in Hong Kong on February 9. China's Ministry of Commerce <a href="https://www.cnn.com/2020/02/06/asia/wuhan-coronavirus-update-intl-hnk/index.html" target="_blank">encouraged supermarkets and grocery stores</a> to resume operations as the country's voluntary or mandatory quarantines began to take an economic toll.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakA shopper walks past empty shelves at a grocery store in Hong Kong on February 9. China’s Ministry of Commerce encouraged supermarkets and grocery stores to resume operations as the country’s voluntary or mandatory quarantines began to take an economic toll.Hide Caption8 of 64

A worker wearing a protective suit uses a machine to disinfect a business establishment in Shanghai, China, on February 9.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakA worker wearing a protective suit uses a machine to disinfect a business establishment in Shanghai, China, on February 9.Hide Caption9 of 64

Workers in protective gear walk near the Diamond Princess cruise ship docked in Yokohama, Japan, on Friday, February 7.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakWorkers in protective gear walk near the Diamond Princess cruise ship docked in Yokohama, Japan, on Friday, February 7.Hide Caption10 of 64

People in Hong Kong attend a vigil February 7 for <a href="https://edition.cnn.com/2020/02/07/asia/china-doctor-death-censorship-intl-hnk/index.html" target="_blank">whistleblower doctor Li Wenliang. </a>Li, 34, died in Wuhan after contracting the virus while treating a patient.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakPeople in Hong Kong attend a vigil February 7 for whistleblower doctor Li Wenliang. Li, 34, died in Wuhan after contracting the virus while treating a patient.Hide Caption11 of 64

A woman grieves while paying tribute to Li at Li's hospital in Wuhan on February 7.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakA woman grieves while paying tribute to Li at Li’s hospital in Wuhan on February 7.Hide Caption12 of 64

The Anthem of the Seas cruise ship is seen docked at the Cape Liberty Cruise Port in Bayonne, New Jersey, on February 7. Passengers were to be screened for coronavirus as a precaution, an official with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention told CNN.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakThe Anthem of the Seas cruise ship is seen docked at the Cape Liberty Cruise Port in Bayonne, New Jersey, on February 7. Passengers were to be screened for coronavirus as a precaution, an official with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention told CNN.Hide Caption13 of 64

A light installation is displayed by striking members of the Hospital Authority Employees Alliance and other activists at the Hospital Authority building in Hong Kong on February 7.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakA light installation is displayed by striking members of the Hospital Authority Employees Alliance and other activists at the Hospital Authority building in Hong Kong on February 7.Hide Caption14 of 64

Passengers are seen on the deck of the Diamond Princess cruise ship, docked at the Yokohama Port on February 7.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakPassengers are seen on the deck of the Diamond Princess cruise ship, docked at the Yokohama Port on February 7.Hide Caption15 of 64

Flight attendants wearing face masks make their way through Don Mueang Airport in Bangkok, Thailand, on February 7.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakFlight attendants wearing face masks make their way through Don Mueang Airport in Bangkok, Thailand, on February 7.Hide Caption16 of 64

Workers check sterile medical gloves at a latex-product manufacturer in Nanjing, China, on Thursday, February 6.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakWorkers check sterile medical gloves at a latex-product manufacturer in Nanjing, China, on Thursday, February 6.Hide Caption17 of 64

A woman wears a protective mask as she shops in a Beijing market on February 6.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakA woman wears a protective mask as she shops in a Beijing market on February 6.Hide Caption18 of 64

This aerial photo shows the Leishenshan Hospital that is being built in Wuhan, China, to handle coronavirus patients.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakThis aerial photo shows the Leishenshan Hospital that is being built in Wuhan, China, to handle coronavirus patients.Hide Caption19 of 64

A passenger shows a note from the World Dream cruise ship docked at the Kai Tak cruise terminal in Hong Kong on Friday, February 5.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakA passenger shows a note from the World Dream cruise ship docked at the Kai Tak cruise terminal in Hong Kong on Friday, February 5.Hide Caption20 of 64

A mask is seen on a statue in Beijing on February 5.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakA mask is seen on a statue in Beijing on February 5.Hide Caption21 of 64

An ambulance stops at a traffic light in front of the Grand Lisboa Hotel in Macao. The virus turned China's gambling mecca <a href="https://www.cnn.com/2020/02/03/asia/china-virus-macao-gambling-intl-hnk/index.html" target="_blank">into a ghost town.</a>

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakAn ambulance stops at a traffic light in front of the Grand Lisboa Hotel in Macao. The virus turned China’s gambling mecca into a ghost town.Hide Caption22 of 64

A dog in Beijing wears a makeshift mask constructed from a paper cup.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakA dog in Beijing wears a makeshift mask constructed from a paper cup.Hide Caption23 of 64

Workers prepare beds at a Wuhan exhibition center that was converted into a makeshift hospital for coronavirus cases.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakWorkers prepare beds at a Wuhan exhibition center that was converted into a makeshift hospital for coronavirus cases.Hide Caption24 of 64

Striking hospital workers in Hong Kong demand the closure of the border with mainland China on Thursday, February 4.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakStriking hospital workers in Hong Kong demand the closure of the border with mainland China on Thursday, February 4.Hide Caption25 of 64

The Diamond Princess cruise ship sits anchored in quarantine off the port of Yokohama, Japan, on February 4. It arrived a day earlier with passengers feeling ill.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakThe Diamond Princess cruise ship sits anchored in quarantine off the port of Yokohama, Japan, on February 4. It arrived a day earlier with passengers feeling ill.Hide Caption26 of 64

A medical worker wearing protective gear waits to take the temperature of people entering Princess Margaret Hospital in Hong Kong on February 4.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakA medical worker wearing protective gear waits to take the temperature of people entering Princess Margaret Hospital in Hong Kong on February 4.Hide Caption27 of 64

Medical workers in protective suits help transfer patients to a newly completed field hospital in Wuhan.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakMedical workers in protective suits help transfer patients to a newly completed field hospital in Wuhan.Hide Caption28 of 64

People wearing protective overalls talk outside a Wuhan hotel housing people in isolation on Monday, February 3.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakPeople wearing protective overalls talk outside a Wuhan hotel housing people in isolation on Monday, February 3.Hide Caption29 of 64

A man stands in front of TV screens broadcasting a speech by Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam on February 3. Lam said the city would shut almost all border-control points to the mainland.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakA man stands in front of TV screens broadcasting a speech by Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam on February 3. Lam said the city would shut almost all border-control points to the mainland.Hide Caption30 of 64

A colleague sprays disinfectant on a doctor in Wuhan on February 3.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakA colleague sprays disinfectant on a doctor in Wuhan on February 3.Hide Caption31 of 64

Commuters in Tokyo walk past an electric board displaying dismal stock prices on February 3, the first business day after the Chinese New Year. Asia's markets recorded their <a href="https://www.cnn.com/2020/02/02/investing/china-markets-coronavirus/index.html" target="_blank">worst day in years</a> as investors finally got a chance to react to the worsening coronavirus outbreak.

Photos: The Wuhan coronavirus outbreakCommuters in Tokyo walk past an electric board displaying dismal stock prices on February 3, the first business day after the Chinese New Year. Asia’s markets recorded their worst day in years as investors finally got a chance to react to the worsening coronavirus outbreak.Hide Caption32 of 64

01 coronavirus 0211 beijing
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Italy (at least 3 cases)

Italy has confirmed its third case of coronavirus, after an Italian national tested positive for the infection, the country’s health ministry said in a statement on Thursday.The patient is the first Italian to contract the virus, following two cases of Chinese tourists with the infection.According to the statement, the patient was quarantined in the city of Cecchignola, on the outskirts of Rome, after being repatriated from Wuhan last week.

Japan (at least 28 cases, plus 175 cruise ship cases)

There are 40 newly discovered cases of coronavirus onboard the Diamond Princess cruise ship docked at Yokohama port, which includes one quarantine officer, Japanese health minister Katsunobu Kato told reporters on Wednesday.This brings the total number of cases from the ship to 175.Kato said that there were 39 new cases, but also one “quarantine officer,” who came aboard the ship to help with the quarantine, who has tested positive.Not including the cruise ship, Japan has confirmed 28 other casesof coronavirus in total.The two latest cases are a man in his 50s and a man in 40s, both of whom came back on charter flights from China. Both had initially tested negative, the health ministry said, but developed a fever at home and were subsequently tested again.

Macao (at least 10 cases)

Macao has confirmed at least 10 cases of the Wuhan coronavirus.A total of 41 entertainment operations in the semiautonomous Chinese city have been suspended for 15 days starting tonight, according to the government.The operations include casinos, betting branches, theaters, cinemas, game centers, internet cafes, discos, bars, nightclubs and dance halls.The outbreak has had a devastating impact on tourism in the gambling enclave, which relies heavily on mainland Chinese visitors. Gambling is illegal on the mainland and Lunar New Year is usually a particularly busy time for Macao’s casinos. But not this year — tourism to the city has dropped 73.6% year-on-year, the Macao government announced on January 29.

Exclusive: Inside Macao's coronavirus isolation ward

Exclusive: Inside Macao’s coronavirus isolation ward 02:49

Malaysia (at least 18 cases)

Malaysia confirmed an additional case of novel coronavirus on Monday, bringing the country’s total to 18, the Ministry of Health said in a tweet.

Nepal (at least 1 case)

There was one confirmed case in Nepal — a 31-year-old Nepali PhD student who lives in Wuhan but flew to Nepal earlier this month. He was admitted to hospital in Kathmandu on January 13, but was subsequently released on January 17 after his condition improved.The Health Ministry said people in close contact with the patient have been identified and are being monitored.

Philippines (at least 3 cases, 1 death)

The Philippines announced its third confirmed case of the Wuhan coronavirus on Wednesday during a news conference by the Department of Health.The patient is said to be a 60-year-old woman from China who arrived in Cebu from Wuhan, via Hong Kong in January.The Philippines reported its first coronavirus fatality on Sunday — the first death from the virus outside of mainland China.The patient was a 44-year-old Chinese man who flew in from Wuhan in January, and who died on Saturday. He is the partner of a 38-year-old Chinese woman who was traveling with him, and who was the first confirmed case reported in the Philippines.Earlier, the Department of Health stressed it is “on top of the evolving situation” but urged the public to wear surgical masks and avoid crowded places if they are experiencing symptoms, such as coughing and a fever.

Russia (at least 2 cases)

Russia has identified its first two cases, both Chinese citizens, Russia’s TASS news agency reported, citing Deputy Prime Minister Tatyana Golikova.One patient is being treated in the Zabaikalsky region, which borders China, with the second case detected in the Tyumen region in Western Siberia, which borders Kazakhstan, TASS reports.According to Golikova, Russia will begin evacuating its citizens from the Chinese provinces of Wuhan and Hubei, where there are 300 and 341 Russians respectively.

Singapore (at least 47 cases)

There are now 47 cases of the novel coronavirus in Singapore.According to a news release by the Ministry of Health, two new cases have no recent travel history to mainland China. One of the patients is a 46-year-old male Singaporean resident and the other is a 39-year-old male Bangladeshi national who works in Singapore.The ministry previously advised citizens to “defer all travel to Hubei province and all non-essential travel to mainland China.”Minister of trade and industry Chan Chun Sing said at a news conference the government will distribute four masks each to 1.3 million households starting Saturday. He added that the country has “sufficient masks” if they manage the supply appropriately.The health ministry earlier urged employers to implement flexible work arrangements, such as working from home or telecommuting, for employees who have been to China in the past 14 days.

South Korea (at least 28 cases)

South Korea has confirmed one more case of Wuhan coronavirus, bringing the total number of cases in the country to 28, the national Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported in a news release on Tuesday.The latest case is a 30-year-old Chinese woman, who is linked to the country’s third case. She tested positive for coronavirus while she was in self-quarantine.An evacuation plane carrying 140 South Koreans and their Chinese family members arrived in Seoul on Wednesday, according to the South Korean foreign ministry.This is the third chartered plane South Korea has sent to retrieve its citizens and their families from the Chinese city.These evacuees will now be quarantined at a military school facility located in a rural area.According to the ministry, there were approximately 2,000 South Korean citizens residing in Wuhan. A total of 841 citizens had been repatriated so far through the three chartered flights.

Spain (at least 2 cases)

Spain’s National Center for Microbiology has confirmed the country’s second case of Wuhan coronavirus.The diagnosed person is one of four that had been in contact with a French national who had been infected with the virus and were subsequently put under observation by Spanish authorities.”The National Center for Microbiology analysed samples from these four people. One of them tested positive for coronavirus while the other three tested negative,” the Spanish health ministry said in a statement on Sunday.

Sri Lanka (at least 1 case)

There is one case of the Wuhan coronavirus in Sri Lanka.A statement from the health ministry assured residents that local hospitals were prepared to handle any further outbreak. The government is contacting people who may have come into contact with the single case to detect potential contagion.

Sweden (at least 1 case)

Sweden on Friday confirmed its first case, a woman in Jonkoping county who had visited Wuhan.When the woman landed in Sweden on January 24, she was free of symptoms of the infection, but later developed a cough and contacted a local hospital, Sweden’s Public Health Authority said in a statement. She was isolated in the hospital’s infection clinic, but is not seriously ill.

Taiwan (at least 18 cases)

Taiwan confirmed its 18th coronavirus case on Sunday, according to a statement from the self-governing island’s Ministry of Health and Welfare.The new case is a 20-year-old man, the son of a couple in their 50s who were confirmed to be coronavirus patients previously.Taiwan has banned travelers who are from mainland China or had been to China, Hong Kong and Macao since Friday.

Thailand (at least 33 cases)

Thailand confirmed one new case of the novel coronavirus on Tuesday, bringing the total in the country to 33, according to Thailand’s Department of Disease Control (DDC).The latest patient is a 54-year-old Chinese woman who traveled from Wuhan before the city was locked down, said DDC director-general, Suwannachai Wattanayingcharoenchai.Thai airports are now screening all Chinese visitors for symptoms. Thai citizens are also being asked to report anyone who seems to have fallen ill after recently traveling from China.

United Arab Emirates (at least 8 cases)

The United Arab Emirates confirmed its eighth case of novel coronavirus on Monday after an Indian national was diagnosed, according to a statement in state news agency WAM.The new patient had recently interacted with another diagnosed person, according to the statement.Of the eight cases, one patient has been admitted to the Intensive Care Unit, while others are in stable condition, the statement said, quoting the Emirati health ministry.

United Kingdom (at least 8 cases)

Four further patients in England have tested positive for novel coronavirus, bringing the total tally to eight, Britain’s Department of Health said in a statement on Monday.The new cases are all known contacts of a previously confirmed UK case, and the virus was passed on in France, the statement says.”Experts at Public Health England continue to work hard tracing patient contacts from the UK cases. They successfully identified these individuals and ensured the appropriate support was provided,” the Department of Health said.

United States (at least 13 cases)

Thirteen people living in the US have tested positive for the novel coronavirus.California has seven cases, Illinois has two, and there is one each in Arizona, Massachusetts, Wisconsin, and in Washington state where that patient was discharged last week.There are two instances of person-to-person transmission in the US — one in Illinois and one in California.The State Department is telling US citizens not to travel to China amid the outbreak. In an advisory posted on the State Department website, the agency elevated its travel warning to “Do Not Travel” and warned of possible “travel restrictions to be put into effect with little or no advance notice.”The advisory said US citizens currently in China should consider leaving using commercial means.

Wuhan evacuee: When the plane landed, we cheered

Wuhan evacuee: When the plane landed, we cheered 02:13

Vietnam (at least 15 cases)

Vietnam has confirmed two new cases of novel coronavirus, including a 3-month-old baby, bringing its total number of cases to 15, according to state-run Vietnam News Agency (VNA) on Tuesday.VNA reported that the baby girl, who is from northern Vinh Phuc province, tested positive after her grandmother previously contracted the coronavirus. She remains in stable condition.The other patient is a 55-year-old woman who is the neighbor of a person who recently visited Wuhan, China.

CNN’s Pauline Lockwood, Isaac Yee, Sarah Faidell, Junko Ogura, Yoko Wakatsuki, Yoonjung Seo, Joe Sutton, Jennifer Hansler, Saskya Vandoorne, Fanny Bobille, Hira Humayun, Anna Kam, Artemis Moshtaghian, Jaide Timm-Garcia, AJ Davis, Karen Smith, Steve Tuemmler, Nada Altaher, Mick Krever, Kocha Olarn and Sugam Pokharel contributed reporting.

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February 10 coronavirus news

Updated 0225 GMT (1025 HKT) February 11, 2020Share

What you need to know

  • The virus: The Wuhan coronavirus has killed more than 1,000 people globally since the outbreak began, according to authorities. More than 40,000 have been infected.
  • Deadlier than SARS: Since its outbreak in December, the Wuhan coronavirus has killed more people than the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) outbreak, which claimed 774 victims globally from November 2002 to July 2003.
  • Coronavirus cruise: There are 65 newly confirmed coronavirus cases on the Diamond Princess ship docked in Japan, bringing the total number on board to 135.

PAID CONTENT

BY 

60 PostsSORT BYLatestOldest9:02 p.m. ET, February 10, 2020

CNN’s live coverage of the coronavirus has moved here.5:31 p.m. ET, February 10, 2020

Global death toll passes 1,000

From CNN’s Steven Jiang in Beijing and Larry Register in Atlanta

The Hubei health authority reported that 103 more people died of the coronavirus in Hubei province on Monday, raising the death toll in the epidemic’s epicenter to 974.

This brings the total number of deaths in mainland China to at least 1,011. Globally, a total of 1,013 people have died, including one death in Hong Kong and one in the Philippines.

Hubei authorities confirmed an additional 2,097 cases of the virus in Hubei on Monday, which brings the total number of cases in the region to 31,728.

More than 25,000 patients have been hospitalized in Hubei, including 1,298 who are in critical condition, according to the health authority. More than two thousand patients have been cured and discharged.

The global number of confirmed coronavirus cases now exceeds 42,500. The vast majority of cases remains in mainland China.

China’s National Health Commission is expected to release numbers for all of China’s provinces later.5:00 p.m. ET, February 10, 2020

Where cases of coronavirus have been confirmed around the world

Cases of coronavirus have been confirmed in more than two dozen countries, and health officials are working to contain the spread.

Here’s a look at where the cases are throughout the world, according to World Health Organization data. These numbers may differ from those reported by national health authorities, who report updated totals at different times than the WHO.

5:00 p.m. ET, February 10, 2020

Cruise ship sets sail after coronavirus scare

From CNN’s Giulia McDonnell Nieto del Rio

After fears of the novel coronavirus kept it docked for almost two days, the Royal Caribbean “Anthem of the Seas” cruise ship left port in New Jersey at 3 p.m. today and is en route to Bermuda, according to a revised itinerary from the cruise line.

A customer service representative for Royal Caribbean also confirmed to CNN that the ship has departed.

The four passengers evaluated for coronavirus all tested negative and were discharged from the hospital, according to a statement from New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy.4:29 p.m. ET, February 10, 2020

World Health Organization team arrives in China

From CNN’s Anastasia Graham-Yooll in London

The World Health Organization (WHO) says a team of international experts from WHO arrived in China on Monday to assist with containing the novel coronavirus outbreak. WHO says this is an “advance” team.

WHO Director General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said the team will “lay the groundwork for larger international team” who will join them “as soon as possible.” The team could range between 10 and 15.

On Sunday, as the team departed for China,Director-General Ghebreyesus said on Twitter the international expert mission to China will be “led by Dr. Bruce Aylward, veteran of past public health emergencies.”

Aylward lead the WHO’s response to Ebola, as well as initiatives for immunization, communicable diseases control and polio eradication.5:13 p.m. ET, February 10, 2020

Trump proposes cuts to global health programs during coronavirus 

From CNN’s Jennifer Hansler

Alex Edelman/Bloomberg/Getty Images
Alex Edelman/Bloomberg/Getty Images

The newly unveiled Trump administration budget proposal includes steep cuts for global health programs and the World Health Organization, even as the world grapples with the spread of the novel coronavirus. However, it does increase its proposed funding for Global Health Security. 

The FY21 Budget Proposal, released today, outlines a nearly $65M proposed cut to the World Health Organization – a more than 50% decrease from FY20 funding.

It also proposes a 34% overall cut to Global Health Programs.

It includes a proposed $115 million for Global Health Security aimed at enabling “the U.S. government, in partnership with other nations, international organizations, and public and private stakeholders, to prevent avoidable epidemics, detect threats early, and respond rapidly and effectively to disease outbreaks and other critical infectious disease threats (including anti-microbial resistance) in an effort to prevent them from becoming national or global emergencies.” This is an increase of $25 million from last year’s request.

Asked by CNN about the impact the WHO cut could have on the global coronavirus response, the Director of the Department of State’s Bureau of Budget & Planning downplayed the potential negative consequences.

“We believe that each of the international organizations has a need for greater accountability and efficiency,” Douglas Pitkin said during a briefing at the State Department Monday. “We have other mechanisms…for providing resources, targeted outreach and targeted efforts to reach specific diseases and health crises.”

Jim Richardson, the Director of US Foreign Assistance Resources at the State Department, said the US was the “largest donor overall to global health around the world.”

“We do think that it’s important to balance the multilateral against the bilateral assistance,” Richardson said. “Both are important, but it is important for us to make sure that we get the appropriate reform to the multilateral while delivering the best assistance that we possibly can on the ground, and that’s often through bilateral.”

Deputy Secretary of State Steve Biegun claimed that the budget bolsters “country capacity to prevent, detect and respond to outbreaks and to prevent epidemics from reaching our borders.”

“It also allows us to provide the necessary flexibility to respond to emerging global health threats such as the novel coronavirus and Ebola,” he said at the State Department. Biegun praised the State Department and USAID efforts in responding to the novel coronavirus.PAID CONTENT

Recommended by3:43 p.m. ET, February 10, 2020

No coronavirus cases found in the first group of Americans evacuated from Wuhan

From CNN’s Stella Chan

A charter plane carrying passengers evacuated from Wuhan, China, lands at March Air Reserve Base on January 29.
A charter plane carrying passengers evacuated from Wuhan, China, lands at March Air Reserve Base on January 29. Matt Hartman/AFP/Getty Images

No one from the first group of Americans evacuated from Wuhan has tested positive for the novel coronavirus, according to Riverside County Health Officials.

“To date, no one has tested positive for novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV) among the 195 in quarantine. Two individuals with symptoms were retested and also found to be negative, and have since recovered,” said Public Health Officer Cameron Kaiser, in a statement from the Riverside County Public Health Department.

The group of passengers arrived at the base on Jan. 29 after arriving from China. Many of the passengers work for the US State Department or are related to someone who does. They have been isolated from base personnel and were not permitted to leave the fenced quarantine area.

They have been on a 14-day quarantine that expires on Tuesday, and they will be free to leave March Air Reserve Base if they do not display any symptoms.3:05 p.m. ET, February 10, 2020

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See the highlights of the 2020 Oscars red carpet

Tributes to Kobe Bryant, political embroidery and moms as dates. These trends dominated the Academy Awards red carpet.Source: CNN

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The ad you didn’t see during the Oscars

A company that sells postpartum products says ABC network and The Academy Awards rejected their ad for being “too graphic.”Source: CNN

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Michael Jackson’s ‘Neverland’ Relists for $31 Million—Or 70% Off

before the documentary ‘Leaving Neverland’ hits the airwaves, the California property of the late pop star seeks a fraction of its original 2015 asking price.

BY CANDACE TAYLOR  |  ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED ON FEBRUARY 26, 2019  |  THE WALL STREET JOURNAL

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A llama on the property. At one time Mr. Jackson kept exotic animals on the ranch, such as orangutans and an elephant.
The main house at the ranch.
One reason the property was taken off the market was the way the grounds appeared during the California drought, according to the listing agents.
The Los Olivos property spans about 2,700 acres.
The swimming pool.
A tree on the property.
A barbecue area.
The ranch is located about 40 miles from Santa Barbara.
The tennis court.

1 of 10  The main house at the ranch.JIM BARTSCH

The onetime “Neverland” ranch of the late pop star Michael Jackson is returning to the market for $31 million, a dramatic discount from its original asking price of $100 million in 2015.

It is the latest development in the yearslong effort to sell the property. In 2017, after nearly two years on the market at the $100 million price tag, the property switched listing agents to Beverly Hills, Calif.-based Joyce Rey of Coldwell Banker, and the price was slashed to $67 million. A few months later it was taken off the market. It is now being relisted at the $31 million price with Suzanne Perkins of Compass, who was one of the original listing agents from the property’s first go on the market in 2015.

Ms. Perkins said the property failed to sell in part because “a price tag of $100 million is not chump change.” Plus the property didn’t show well because of the drought affecting California at the time, said Kyle Forsyth, a colleague of Ms. Perkins who shares the listing. The property was also held off the market because of the mudslides and wildfires that afflicted the Santa Barbara, Calif. area. “Everyone pulled back for about a year in general,” Mr. Forsyth said, but now “it’s the right time.”

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Well, sort of: In a few days, HBO is slated to air a documentary entitled “Leaving Neverland” that details the accounts of two men who say they were molested by the pop star as children. Mr. Jackson’s estate filed a breach of contract lawsuit against HBO, alleging that airing the documentary would violate a nondisparagement clause from a 1992 contract with Mr. Jackson, according to Howard Weitzman, an attorney for the Jackson estate.

Mr. Weitzman said the timing of the listing has no relationship to the documentary and lawsuit and is entirely coincidental. Mr. Forsyth added that the owners want to sell because “it’s time for new stewardship.”

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Michael Jackson’s ‘Neverland’ Relists for $31 Million—Or 70% Off

 before the documentary ‘Leaving Neverland’ hits the airwaves, the California property of the late pop star seeks a fraction of its original 2015 asking price.

BY CANDACE TAYLOR  |  ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED ON FEBRUARY 26, 2019  |  THE WALL STREET JOURNAL

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A llama on the property. At one time Mr. Jackson kept exotic animals on the ranch, such as orangutans and an elephant.
The main house at the ranch.
One reason the property was taken off the market was the way the grounds appeared during the California drought, according to the listing agents.
The Los Olivos property spans about 2,700 acres.
The swimming pool.
A tree on the property.
A barbecue area.
The ranch is located about 40 miles from Santa Barbara.
The tennis court.

1 of 10  The main house at the ranch.JIM BARTSCH

The onetime “Neverland” ranch of the late pop star Michael Jackson is returning to the market for $31 million, a dramatic discount from its original asking price of $100 million in 2015.

It is the latest development in the yearslong effort to sell the property. In 2017, after nearly two years on the market at the $100 million price tag, the property switched listing agents to Beverly Hills, Calif.-based Joyce Rey of Coldwell Banker, and the price was slashed to $67 million. A few months later it was taken off the market. It is now being relisted at the $31 million price with Suzanne Perkins of Compass, who was one of the original listing agents from the property’s first go on the market in 2015.

Ms. Perkins said the property failed to sell in part because “a price tag of $100 million is not chump change.” Plus the property didn’t show well because of the drought affecting California at the time, said Kyle Forsyth, a colleague of Ms. Perkins who shares the listing. The property was also held off the market because of the mudslides and wildfires that afflicted the Santa Barbara, Calif. area. “Everyone pulled back for about a year in general,” Mr. Forsyth said, but now “it’s the right time.”

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611:15 PM – Mar 5, 2019Twitter Ads info and privacySee Mansion Global’s other Tweets

Well, sort of: In a few days, HBO is slated to air a documentary entitled “Leaving Neverland” that details the accounts of two men who say they were molested by the pop star as children. Mr. Jackson’s estate filed a breach of contract lawsuit against HBO, alleging that airing the documentary would violate a nondisparagement clause from a 1992 contract with Mr. Jackson, according to Howard Weitzman, an attorney for the Jackson estate.

Mr. Weitzman said the timing of the listing has no relationship to the documentary and lawsuit and is entirely coincidental. Mr. Forsyth added that the owners want to sell because “it’s time for new stewardship.”

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Located about 40 miles from Santa Barbara, the ranch is owned by a joint venture between Mr. Jackson’s estate and a fund managed by Colony Capital, a real-estate investment trust. Mr. Jackson had defaulted on a loan backed by the ranch, and Colony bought the note in 2008 and put the property’s title into a joint venture it formed with the pop star.

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Mr. Jackson paid $19.5 million for the Los Olivos property in 1987 and lived there more than 15 years, during which time he added whimsical features such a floral clock that spells out “Neverland” and a train station. Those structures remain in place on the roughly 2,700-acre property, along with the roughly 12,000-square-foot main house where Mr. Jackson lived.

The amusement park rides once installed no longer exist, Mr. Forsyth said, although the fire department building does, along with a 1950s firetruck, a swimming pool, basketball court and multiple guesthouses.

Colony spent millions on upgrades to the infrastructure, systems and landscaping with an eye to selling the property, but didn’t make major changes, according to Mr. Forsyth, who previously worked at Colony as the asset manager for the ranch. He emphasized that the property is now known as “Sycamore Valley Ranch.”

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A Gothic Villa in Central London

 gothic architecture and an expansive back garden in the center of London.

BY MATEO TATE  |  ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED ON JULY 10, 2019  |  MANSION GLOBAL

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The home’s expansive lawn is ideal for entertaining.
Centrally located in the London neighborhood of St. John’s Wood, the 5,479-square-foot Gothic villa is bordered by scenic landscaping.
The interior features wood plank flooring and a classic design.
Pops of pastel paint add a touch of color to the tonally neutral interior.
Natural light streams into the residence. The kitchen has an open design with a modern aesthetic.
The interior features detailed moulding throughout.
The residence spans two floors and features a view of the surrounding neighborhood.
The home currently has five bedrooms. A proposed plan will add a sixth bedroom to the home.
The house has five bathrooms.
“The home has extensive front- and rear-landscaped gardens with a large rear terrace ideal for al fresco dining,” said listing agent Mark Pollack of Aston Chase. “My personal favorite part is the vine-covered stone pergola which creates a romantic setting adjacent to the magnificent lawn.”

1 of 12  The home’s white exterior is enlivened by a pitched roof with black shingles and rows of picturesque windows that give the residence a provincial feel.

Listing of the Day

Location: St. John’s Wood, London

Price: £15 million (US$19.11 million)

Through a black gate and past a hedge of vibrant foliage stands this cozy Gothic Villa in the central London neighborhood of St. John’s Wood.

“The most striking part of this home is its Gothic-style detailing and white stucco façade, which boasts fantastic ‘curb appeal’,” said listing agent Mark Pollack of Aston Chase. 

Built in 1843, Mr. Pollack noted that the home’s classic design and scenic landscaping mean it “wouldn’t look out of place in the countryside, despite its central London location.” Featuring a motif of pointed spires, the home’s white exterior is enlivened by a pitched roof with black shingles and rows of picturesque windows that give the residence a provincial feel.

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The home’s interior maintains this classic sensibility with wooden plank flooring, detailed moulding and a neutral palette brightened by pops of pastels and patterned wallpaper. 

A convergence of windows, skylights, and both recessed and modern lighting fixtures ensure the interior is flooded with light. 

Mr. Pollack said the Gothic residence “provides extensive family accommodation and beautiful entertaining areas allowing for a very relaxed and sophisticated lifestyle, with the formal dining room perfect for hosting dinner parties.” 

Yet the home’s highlight is undoubtedly its expansive back garden, which features scenic landscaping, a stone terrace, and a verdant lawn ideal for entertaining.   

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“The home has extensive front and rear landscaped gardens with a large rear terrace ideal for al fresco dining,” Mr. Pollack described. “My personal favorite part is the vine-covered stone pergola which creates a romantic setting adjacent to the magnificent lawn.”

Stats

Spanning two floors, the 5,579-square-foot residence includes five bedrooms and five bathrooms. 

Proposed planning will add 2,531 square feet of additional space on the lower level.

Amenities  

In addition to the expansive back garden, the residence includes a study, a games room, and a bathroom with a rainfall shower.

Mr. Pollack noted, the new plan will add “a leisure complex complete with a swimming pool, gym, spa, steam room, sauna and changing facilities” alongside “a cinema room, wine cellar and a sixth [or] staff bedroom with en-suite shower room.”

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Neighborhood Notes 

The residence is located in the central London neighborhood of St. John’s Wood, known for its tranquil residential area, boutique-filled high streets, and international schools.

Mr. Pollack noted, “The ideal homeowner would be for a family wanting to capitalize on the nearby schooling, amenities of St. John’s Wood and the connectivity provided by the St. John’s Wood underground station to the City and Canary Wharf via the Jubilee line.”

Agent: Mark Pollack, Co-Founder and Directory of Aston Chase

View the original listing. Write to Listing of the Day

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‘Breaking Bad’ Star Aaron Paul Sells Sunset Strip Home for Just Under $2.2 Million

os Angeles

BY NANCY A. RUHLING  |  ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED ON DECEMBER 31, 2019  |  MANSION GLOBAL

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The West Hollywood home of actor Aaron Paul is in the Spanish Colonial-Revival style.
The garden, complete with a statue of Buddha, is a contemplative space.
The bar also offers beautiful views of the city.
A patio merges the indoors with the outdoors.
The master suite has a glassed-in sitting room.
A large stone fireplace dominates the living room.
The dining room has views of downtown Los Angeles.
The entry is grand.

1 of 9  The garden, complete with a statue of Buddha, is a contemplative space.NOEL KLEINMAN, COURTESY OF SMITH & BERG PARTNERS

“Breaking Bad” actor Aaron Paul has sold his 1930s Spanish Colonial Revival-style mansion above Los Angeles’s Sunset Strip for $2.198 million.

He bought the West Hollywood home through a trust for $1.399 million in 2012 and put it on the market in April 2019 for $2.499 million, according to property records.

The listing agents, Trevor Edmond, F. Ron Smith and David Berg, who are with the Smith & Berg Partners team at Compass, declined to comment on the Dec. 27 sale, and emails sent to Mr. Paul’s representatives were not immediately answered.

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Mansion Global was not immediately able to determine the identity of the buyer.

Mr. Paul, who is 40, recently bought the Los Angeles home of “The Big Bang Theory” star Jim Parsons for $6.95 million, according to published reports.

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